Unigraphic

  www.uni-graphic.com
  www.uni-graphic.com
There are newer employer reviews for Unigraphic

 

an OK place to work

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Engineer in Boston, MA
Former Employee - Engineer in Boston, MA

I worked at Unigraphic full-time (more than 3 years)

Pros

very collabortive, supportive teamwork environment that is based on trust and respect of each other. the products are continually focused on making the customer successful and the feature, fuction, and UIF advancements are leading edge. the company is a thought leader in the industry

Cons

should be more sharing of successful quarters / profits with the employees.
outside non-connected ownership

Advice to ManagementAdvice

continiue improvement based on employee survey action areas

Recommends
Neutral Outlook

3 Other Employee Reviews for Unigraphic (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Horrible experience overall, nothing good to say

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Production
    Former Employee - Production

    I worked at Unigraphic full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    None, zero, zip, nada. nothing

    Cons

    Everything about the company is run horribly wrong

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Leave now, start valuing the employees who work for you.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2.  

    don't do it man...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Woburn, MA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Woburn, MA

    I have been working at Unigraphic

    Pros

    If you need a job, you take one that's offered and that sounds good at the time. It's only later on that you find out the truth of a company.

    Cons

    Management lays people off twice a year, as they approach slow times/months in the printing industry. This happens (typically) before the July 4th holiday, and then again towards the end of the year holiday season. They also cut services that most business would not cut, such as cleaning services/crews. Management is unable to properly manage finances, or panics when the slower times approach, and use lay-offs as a way to get through the leaner times. Instead of properly planning business running expenses, they simply cut top salaries and make departments cut people, even when they are already running below what they should be (for head count). It also doesn't matter what your duties are within the company, chances are you'll be cut (unless you're one of the lucky few that they know they cannot live without). They do look, or at least they say they do/will, to bring the people they lay-off back on x weeks/months later when the work load has picked up again. Overall, a very crappy way to treat employees. You don't feel like the upper management cares about what you do for them, they just want to get away cheap.

    They also look to resolve issues with the cheapest possible solutions. You almost need to go to them with the highest possible cost first, then when you get the actual cost/quote (which is lower), go to them for approval. You pray that they do approve the solution so that things are done properly.

    They also tend to purchase other companies, keeping the acquired companies entire staffing, and then lay off those that they should have not brought over.

    Large purchases are typically financed through leasing companies, not using company finances. This extends the amount of time from when something is finalized to when the actual purchase is made by several days, if not a few weeks. I've never worked anyplace that would use this model for any purchases that are over a small amount (anything over about $20k they lease). Has to make you wonder how little they actually have in the bank during any given week/month to cover operational expenses and such.

    Had I seen this information before taking the position at the company, I wouldn't have accepted the job.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Figure out how to maintain a solid/steady staffing level year round, not just during the good times. Don't have bi-annual layoffs where people have to wonder if they'll fall victim during the next round or not. Stop having knee-jerk reactions to industry slow-downs for the region. You've been around long enough to know when these happen, plan accordingly so that you don't lay people off for those x weeks.

    Doesn't Recommend
There are newer employer reviews for Unigraphic

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