United BioSource

  www.ubc.com
  www.ubc.com
There are newer employer reviews for United BioSource

1 person found this helpful  

Satellite office review

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Software Testing Engineer in Langhorne, PA
Current Employee - Software Testing Engineer in Langhorne, PA

I have been working at United BioSource

Pros

Flexible work hours when needed. Good work environment. Good co-workers.

Cons

Sometimes overtime is mandatory. Promotions are easier to get when not located in a satellite office. Balance between work and personal lives is sometimes blurred.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Regulate the flow of workload to employees better. Accepted contracts for the sake of accepting them wears thin on the employees and leads to people burning out.

No opinion of CEO

60 Other Employee Reviews for United BioSource (View Most Recent)

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    A lot of work, a lot of stress. Good benefits, decent salary, flexible work in office / work from home hours.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA

    I have been working at United BioSource

    Pros

    Very Good atmosphere and people.
    Great benefits.
    Managers are pretty flexible and people can Work From Home or Leave work early if they need to, as long as it does not interfere with the deliverables

    Cons

    A lot of stress.
    Very long hours, sometimes you can find yourself working at 1am (though of course from home)
    Stupid scheduling of the projects and resource assignments. People get overworked and frustrated because, project assignment often overlap.
    The company rests on the shoulders of experienced managers who've with the company for an average of 6 years. The problem though is that UBC works those people to a bone, and if they leave everything is going to go haywire.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Do not take on so many projects, and make sure that Scheduling is done correctly without overlapping.

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Software & QA Engineers - If You Are a Masochist You'll Love this Place!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Software Applications Developer in San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Software Applications Developer in San Francisco, CA

    I worked at United BioSource

    Pros

    The disillusioned notion that one's work may have an intrinsic value (pharmaceutical research) rather than just participating in an effort to build another cash machine. The people are quite dedicated to their work, friendly and information sharing was never an issue. Nice location and office. Hardware and tools are satisfactory-to-good as long as one does not have to do any UI development.

    Cons

    Repeatedly, project scope is/was drastically underestimated. Forget work-life balance, evenings, weekends, sleep & vacation. Each project is given a two week development cycle regardless of what is/was involved (there are several “two week” evolutions that ended up lasting several months).

    “Two week” evolutions may imply agile development but that would be an acute misperception. The majority of the work involves (tweaking / adding new functionality) to rather voluminous “classic” ASP pages (think VBScript) and (tweaking / adding new functionality) to tsql – think views that wrap views that wrap views that wrap views that wrap views.

    The staff (which primarily consists of Software Engineers, QA personnel and Project Managers) is generally young and minimally to moderately experienced. The management employs the relatively unbridled youth and exuberance of the employees to affect the horrendous timelines. There is an attempt at code reuse but it generally amounts to dependence upon previously generated objects that obfuscate some other logic meant to solve some other problem/issue. As each (solution/project) is associated with a unique database instance, [viewFoo] may, and usually does, do significantly different things on different projects regardless of the fact that they have the same name and owner. As a result, haste and (relative) inexperience often (usually) lead to “Big Balls of Mud” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_ball_of_mud & http://www.laputan.org/mud/).

    Now multiply this by 100’s while trying to interpret "technical" specifications that are written for sales-purposes and that read like the instructions of and ADD-ish chef.

    There are ongoing efforts to improve the infrastructure, methods and techniques however all have been stymied by schedules, emphasis on irrational deadlines and the lack of investment in paying down technological debt.

    Most persons in the engineering department actively seek other positions but often find themselves a bit ... mired ... due to visa sponsorship related issues. Annualized turnover for developers is > 60%, for QA it is > 70%.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Rethink the architecture and implementation techniques that are used as well as the resources that are dedicated to an effort. The power of compound interest applies here, conversely. The longer you continue without refactoring the more expensive it will be to do business.

    Doesn't Recommend
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