There are newer employer reviews for UnitedHealth Group
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Helpful (2)

If your in a good department, company is good

Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

I have been working at UnitedHealth Group

Pros

PTO, good people to work with

Cons

Has some bad middle managers

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  1. Helpful (10)

    I originally wrote “Great company to work for, but there is always room for improvement” but...

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Malvern, PA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Malvern, PA

    I worked at UnitedHealth Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    I just handed in my resignation after just over three years with the company. In my initial review, I praised the company for many things... some of those remain true. The PTO package is still good, better than I would have expected... however, they've moved to a use it or lose it policy. I've gotten married since, the health insurance is relatively expensive to cover my significant other and myself. The HSA sucks, because you're basically handing a portion of every paycheck right back to Optum. Clear conflict of interest there.

    CST's new building is decent... Large, ample parking, top floor off Swedesford Road in Malvern. Even less places to eat nearby than in Newtown Square. That sucks. I worked from home full-time, though, so that won't concern you if you're interested in a work-from-home position. I do have to say that working from home full-time is amazing. I only went into the office three times in 6 months prior to being promoted.

    The pay levels are decent... $15.14 to start in CST as a case coordinator, you get approximately a $1.50 or so raise if you make Lead coordinator ($12 a day and you have to go into the office? Barely covers gas.). CST Supervisors make ~$45k. You can make more as a coordinator with overtime. Managers have a nice jump in pay levels, but I don't have specifics on that. The night shift differential is +10%. You have your choice of 1 hour or 30 minute breaks, but they push you heavily towards 30 minutes.

    Cons

    You are a slave to the ever-rising production quotas. If you don't hit the quota, you either get a small bonus or none at all. Doesn't matter if the whole team is slow, you are expected to hit 26 a day in CST. As a supervisor, your bonuses are based on the production of your employees and reviews by your manager. Long story short, they're gonna suck if your employees don't carry their weight. Repercussions for not hitting productivity include Corrective Action Plans, or CAP's as they are called, and if you get one, you get no bonus that quarter. It's silly because it eliminates all incentive to work hard. CAP's also apply to other things, it's the third level of disciplinary measures that EHR employs. Verbal warning, written warning, then CAP, then termination. I will say it is tough to get a CAP, although that depends on your supe/manager, really.

    Work environment is boring at home. It's even worse in the office, which is sterile. No office decorations allowed. No private cubicles, you're always with others in "squares" of four. Only managers get offices, many sit vacant. Supervisors are also in cubicles. Morale is very low. Employee interaction is minimal as management doesn't like that. I'm sure they'd chain you to your desk if it wasn't illegal. Case Managers complain constantly via phone, they're impossible to satisfy.

    Communication between teams is horrible, between shifts as well. There are differing policies for days and nights, even though they share clients. Shift times overlap creating a dead period at the end of the day shift and beginning of the evening shift. The trainers are ineffective. New hires are "trained' and then have to be retrained on half the stuff they "learned" because they constantly do things wrong. Quality greatly suffers because it is sacrificed to meet quotas.

    Rumbles of unionization are there. The grunts are dissatisfied and it is painfully obvious. Declining pay, rising expectations, and increased focus on and threats of discipline and layoffs from management destroy morale on a daily basis. Some supervisors do their best to lift spirits, but to no avail. I would not place any blame on the case coordinators for unionizing because they are treated like robots, not humans.

    Fringe benefits, like tuition reimbursement, are difficult to get. For example, if you want to be a nurse, they won't pay for it because they couldn't hire you after graduation, as they require clinical experience. Pre-med? Yeah right. If you want to go into IT, it has to be a field they have a business need for. At $5k a year, it isn't much of a benefit, but better than nothing. They flat-out declined to cover any expenses related to a Human Resources degree.

    As mentioned by others, bonuses are now tied to overall company growth performance. So you pay for the failures of other departments in terms of customer retention and acquisition. It doesn't matter how well you perform as an individual if the rest of the company doesn't do their job properly.

    Conflicts of interest galore! There are several instances where certain individuals are supervised by their family members, significant others, lifelong friends. Cronyism is a serious issue not only within my former department, but within the company as a whole.

    HIPPA violations are a dime a dozen. The only ones reported involve outgoing paperwork/emails/faxes. Nothing internal is ever reported unless it's very serious. General security measures are lax at best, internal controls are nonexistent.

    The IT situation is better than it used to be, but still pretty poor. The IT department is constantly overwhelmed. Most tickets take hours or days to get an answer for unless it is related to productivity or core job functions. Then it might only take an hour to be fixed.

    Holiday PTO is tightly controlled. You have to request what days you want off 6-8 months in advance. So if your family doesn't plan anything until October-November like mine, you're SOL. You can only roll over 40 hours of PTO per year. So if you aren't big on long vacations, you basically lose money in the form of PTO every year. There is a huge rush to take remaining PTO in November/December, and availability is limited; people get screwed.

    You also have to work every other weekend, and two holidays a year, out of Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Years... that's right, Easter isn't a holiday!

    Raises are nonexistent unless you are promoted. Promotions are rarely handled based on competence, they are usually based on who you know. Time after time, I've seen highly productive employees passed over for the "cool" kids in the office... Key words, "in the office." You will never get promoted if you work from home full-time unless you work nights.

    No overtime allowed without explicit permission. There is more, too, but I only have 5000 characters.

    Advice to Management

    Stop being shills for the desires of UHC. In the end of the day, when you hop into your brand-new BMW and drive home to your crappy McMansion, think about what you're doing to other people. Yeah, sure, you make decisions that result in increased profitability, but you do it at the cost of others. Grow a backbone, learn to say "no" to UHC, and... wait, I'm just fantasizing, UHC installed current upper management after Dr. Rob Corrato (founder and former CEO) left. Do us all a favor and sell the company back to Dr. Rob, he actually cared about us as people. His goal was to help people... not enslave them to quotas and maximize productivity.

    On a more serious note, stop promoting doctors. They don't know how to run a business. If you insist upon giving them management roles, send them off to business school first so they can understand the needs of a business. It's a fundamental issue when you take individuals who are professionally trained to be reactive (diagnose and treat problems) rather than proactive and put them in a role that requires forward thinking and planning.

    In CST, don't promote people known for harsh treatment of their subordinates. Don't threaten employees with repercussions every time they don't hit their metrics. Offer some positive reinforcement once in a while. Remember that happy employees are productive employees. Be a little more understanding about technical issues; the grunts are just as frustrated as you are. Don't overwhelm employees with hundreds of passwords that literally require hours of maintenance every week and get mad when some expire or don't work. Do your best to remember, that under all those late cases, screwed up numbers on our screens, countless CCA tickets, and bad days, that those grunts are human too. Most of us once sat in their seats, and our jobs were easier than theirs are today. Cut them a break once in a while.

    Remember this statement and sentiment shared universally by almost all EHR employees not in management; United Healthcare was the worst thing to happen to EHR. A thriving, entrepreneurial business went from a 4.2 stars average in July of 2012 to 2.4 average today. That tells you everything you need to know. One star to counter out my previous 4 star review... a 2.5 average, which is about right.


  2. Top notch organization

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Purchasing in Minneapolis, MN
    Current Employee - Purchasing in Minneapolis, MN

    I have been working at UnitedHealth Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    They really care about the culture of the organization, which is something I've never seen at another company. They're very organized and do things the right way.

    Cons

    I haven't seen any cons yet, other than being in a big company you may not get noticed for a while.

    Advice to Management

    Keep up the good work!


There are newer employer reviews for UnitedHealth Group
There are newer employer reviews for UnitedHealth Group

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