University of Tennessee

  www.tennessee.edu
  www.tennessee.edu
There are newer employer reviews for University of Tennessee

 

This was a truly life altering experience that has given me a plateau to reach great heights.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

I worked at University of Tennessee

Pros

Course load, support, natural location

Cons

The only con would be the hours.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

It would be better to truly evaluate your workers on a year basis.

Approves of CEO

136 Other Employee Reviews for University of Tennessee (View Most Recent)

Sort: Rating Date
  1.  

    Experience working at IM Sports is fun and challenging

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Official
    Current Employee - Official

    I have been working at University of Tennessee

    Pros

    If you love sports then working here is the best place to work. Make good money and can advance pretty quickly to manager.

    Cons

    only downsides is depending on what sports you choose to officiate. Basketball participants are cruel and rude. Flag football and Indoor Soccer are during the cold weather.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Don't jump so quick to promoting newcomers. Should realize that we are first students and should only schedule us based on what our availability is.

    Recommends
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Good if you are young; less of a good feeling if you are non-tenured and over 45.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Senior Research Associate
    Former Employee - Senior Research Associate

    I worked at University of Tennessee

    Pros

    Six weeks vacation, free tuition for full-time employees, annual longevity payment, fantastic retirement plan (10% match), little administrative oversight, and intellectually stimulating if you land the right research position.

    Cons

    If you are over 40, you must have a Ph.D. to advance in a staff position, and to gain any respect at all from tenured faculty. Low morale is widespread in recent years because of no pay raises from the State. Pay is low already compared to the private sector; the unfortunate anti-public worker backlash and rising health insurance premiums have worked together to create negative salary growth for many. (If you are in the >$100K "club," this is less of a problem - higher paid personnel usually manage to to get pay raises through professional advancement and/or latching onto research center directorships, fellowships, grants, etc.) Must be extremely self-motivated and self-promoting in most non-faculty research positions; there is little direction and even less feedback. Most positions are very political - you get where you are going by people you know, your ability to impress them, and not pissing off influential people. Finally, dealing with career academicians is sometimes a challenge - this is a Research I university and to have landed a tenure-track position in the past 20 years, one usually must be very highly credentialed. Therefore, younger professors in particular tend to be highly-motivated, highly-stressed Type A individuals - not your typical laid-back Knoxvillian.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Spread some of the wealth - the gap is growing! Also, don't turn UT into a "trade school" - there is great value in being schooled in the humanities, despite the direct connection to "marketability." Finally, stop chopping down all the big trees and tearing down all the old buildings! Take a clue from the top 25 universities - they generally have green, canopied campuses and reuse their old buildings containing architectural features that cannot be duplicated in modern times.

    No opinion of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for University of Tennessee

Work at University of Tennessee? Share Your Experiences

University of Tennessee

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.