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Helpful (1)

Fantastic company

  • Culture & Values
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

I have been working at VMware

Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Approves of CEO
Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Approves of CEO

Pros

Market leader in virtualization space.

Cons

Salaries can be underwhelming depending on your job responsibility.

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  1. Helpful (1)

    Contractor job @ VMWare

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Contractor - Project Manager in Palo Alto, CA
    Former Contractor - Project Manager in Palo Alto, CA

    I worked at VMware as a contractor (Less than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Nothing that I can acknowledge. Oh, fee soda!

    Cons

    Don't know where they are heading.

    Advice to Management

    Have a clear vision and secure a buy-in from your employee base.


  2. Helpful (8)

    Just Another Big Enterprise Software Company

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at VMware full-time (More than 5 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    By working in R&D you get insight into how a computer works. There's a diverse array of software to work on, from low-level coding to UIs to website development. The core visualization groups can be a good place for a new college grad to develop good software development practices.

    Cons

    There was a bulk exodus of R&D in 2011 when the equity grants from VMware's founding CEO finished vesting. That founding CEO was replaced with a new CEO that could offer a vision for the future, but no plan to execute on it (nor a plan to "re-green" people, probably because he came from Seattle and wasn't used to the high degree of mobility offered by Silicon Valley). He also couldn't be bothered with running a company and hired others to do it. In 2012 VMware spent $1.25B on Nicira, in effect buying back some of the people that left in or before 2011. Shortly after he resigned at his 4 year anniversary and cashed out $26M in equity--since Nicira was funded in part by his predecessor that suggests he didn't have a superior vision after all.

    His replacement (the current CEO) is more geared towards running a company but hasn't done much from a leadership perspective besides jettison the web companies that VMware acquired under his predecessor's leadership. In the meantime R&D has continued to bleed the little talent it has left while replacing them with lesser talent (at least when permitted by headcount restrictions), thus resulting in yet another big software company that has a lot of people who know little and accomplish even less. This 2011 bleed likely contributed to vSphere 5.1 being the "Windows Vista" of virtualization releases, and it's likely to contribute to the next release being the equivalent of "Windows 8". The "Principle Engineers" that remain are less ambitious and don't seem to do much (and certainly don't set a good example or tone for the rest of R&D). The company has taken various surveys to find out how unhappy people are but never took any steps to determine the underlying reasons why or address them. The newer hires try to deal with the post-apocalyptic R&D that offers little in terms of guidance, a high count of bugs to fix and burdensome processes that have been put in place to try to avoid bad code check-ins.

    Advice to Management

    It's too late to correct what happened in 2011. Reassess what the company is now capable of accomplishing in a year and adjust accordingly. Keep track of what's going on. There's now a significant culture where lower management won't report a problem to upper management unless/until an answer or solution is known. This means you hear about the smaller issues but won't hear about the big problems until it's too late and the most you can do is fire people. Swallow your pride and reconsider whether certain software releases should still happen. Try walking around campus and randomly pick a few meetings to sit in to assess whether people are being productive and working on stuff that matters or just busywork and politics.


There are newer employer reviews for VMware
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