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The best job of my life so far.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

I have been working at W.L. Gore full-time for more than 10 years

Pros

Great culture. Great people. Easy.

Cons

Pay is below industry standard.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Bring pay up to industry standards

Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Approves of CEO

220 Other Employee Reviews for W.L. Gore (View Most Recent)

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  1. 7 people found this helpful  

    At first I thought I'd retire here...now very dissapointed

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Engineer  in  Flag, AR
    Current Employee - Engineer in Flag, AR

    I have been working at W.L. Gore full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    Privately held company which prevents rock-star CEO's from implementing short term strategy driven by stock price, work/life balance OK, good for people right out of school, ESOP is great

    Cons

    Gore gets 3 stars out of 5 on www.glassdoor.com; filter out the comments by interns (which there are many. Sorry kids but you have a lot to learn) and you have about 2 of 5 stars. Take out the “lifers” (10 years plus) and it gets really bad. I started with Gore 8 years ago; 5 in another division and 3 in medical products, and I have noticed some striking shortfalls regarding the practice of the company culture within medical. Most notably, that of “the belief in the individual” for associates that enter as seasoned successful professionals. Internal employee satisfaction surveys are, in general, favorable but the “my contributions are valued” category is consistently lagging. I would assert that digging into the details of the data one would find entry-level and longtime medical associates buoy up the score relative to that recorded by professionals brought in from outside. I know from conversations with HR that retention of these folks is a problem (I omit the number for privacy - it is low!); I have, in my short time within medical, spoken with an alarming number of ex and current associates who are not happy or have left. These are people who are hired for their expertise but then marginalized. To HR’s credit, there is work to address this as evidenced by the coining of terms like “micro-inequities” (a kind of passive-aggressive “you know very little” message) and projects aimed at re-vamping the employee ranking process. This is great, but the hardest step in addressing micro-inequities is getting people who, without malice, do it quite unintentionally (I am being lenient here). Website comments describing the leadership culture use terms like, “high school”, “good old boys network”, and “popularity contest” (I’d add egotistical and xenophobic as well.)This sentiment may be affected by posters frustration, but I feel there is a good amount of truth here. I can only relate my experience thus far - I’m a 20 year professional with 2 patents and a history of working for good companies. Inside my first year at Gore, colleagues in leadership meetings informed me that I was being to be groomed for a leadership role. In the next 2 years I presented at multiple technical meetings in the US and Europe and worked with US and German scientists on high visibility projects. Gore sent me to multiple external training conferences. This is belief in the individual – I felt that I was growing professionally and consequently, my attitude and quality of work were at their best. My training upon moving to medical was to read dozens of cryptic quality system documents and to work in manufacturing. The latter is totally reasonable but the investment in me ended there. Even integral processes within my manufacturing unit are off limits – I am told it is “need to know”. Seriously?!! This would never happen in the eastern cluster. I came on with the understanding that I had much to learn in the new division and went about finding my niche the best I could. I am strong at finding opportunities to improve existing processes and develop core understanding; this is how I found commitments. I did this without any manufacturing line or product line responsibilities given, made available, or suggested. Unfortunately my concept of what is important for a mature professional (technical knowledge and problem solving) is valued less than basic line maintenance and paperwork. The associate ranking process has put me at the bottom for the last three years and now I’m on probation; this is a 180 from my start with Gore; have I changed that much? For the past year, I have rigorously pursued a better fit. This has not gone well either – call it paranoia, but interviews that go well and jobs that require specific experience that I possess go to less qualified. In one instance an interview did not happen because my leadership offered, “he’s not a fit for that”. That should be me and the hiring mangers decision.
    Currently, I have decided to resign. I’d love to learn more about HR’s challenges and perhaps offer some insight but after numerous meetings, I have yet to be asked. My best advice to any motivated, seasoned professional who wants to come in and make change is get to HR or someone in leadership to substantially back and advocate for you. How this plays out exactly, I don’t know, but you will be marginalized daily and will need support. Folks are aware of the problem, want to fix it, and should be amenable to this idea. Show them this or any other glassdoor post that talks of this subject and get their reaction. This is risky, however. Though the intent is to be constructive, dissenters here are slapped with a “does not fit the culture” label. But, if your interview team is honest, they will see the benefit. I would love to feel energized about Gore again as I did in my earlier days but it is time to cut my losses and move on.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    HR needs to hire fresh experienced professionals and back them! I hope this feedback can give a push to programs which would help future associates have an easier time assimilating to medical. Or, help sombody make a better informed decision about accepting employment.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Love GORE!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at W.L. Gore full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Wouldn't work anywhere else other than Gore.

    Cons

    None that I can think of.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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