There are newer employer reviews for WNET
There are newer employer reviews for WNET

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Good place to work.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Contractor - Anonymous Contractor
Former Contractor - Anonymous Contractor

I worked at WNET as a contractor (Less than a year)

Doesn't Recommend
Neutral Outlook
Doesn't Recommend
Neutral Outlook

Pros

Generally a good place to work.

Cons

Average age of staff people is older than you might expect.

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  1. Helpful (1)

    ok, not amazing

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at WNET full-time (More than 5 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    Pros

    great colleagues. admirable mission. produces programming to be proud of.

    Cons

    paranoiac leadership that has developed one-track mind with only developing "news" for its new programming

    Advice to Management

    there is a major vacuum of cooperative transparency and almost sociopathic insecurity at most of the executive positions. it seems to have gotten better over the years, but management would be well-served to become more honest and appreciative toward the folks that actually run the place: the mid and lower-level employees. career development is almost reverse.

  2. Helpful (2)

    Nice people, some hard-working and bright, in a place that is struggling under the weight of its growing irrelevance.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at WNET

    Doesn't Recommend
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    Pretty humane; good-hearted and mostly nice people. Not cutthroat; there are definitely meaner places to work. Some fun creatives. A good percentage of the people are idealistic about what they do, and that is very nice. People there really believe in the importance of public media. Some of the productions are very high quality. There are pockets of real talent. Really strong middle management layer that acts as the "invisible hand," gluing a lot of the day-to-day together. People bash the news but there is some very high quality stuff coming out of that area. Some new leadership coming in that seem to "get it".

    Cons

    No raises for over three years while simultaneously being told that the finances are improving. Subsequent defections are often blamed on the respective managers. To be fair, a lot of the managers are very non-profit-y and may have trouble functioning in the for-profit world. Strategies are fragmented--no real answers about how this org is going to adapt to reach new/younger audiences. Some real weaknesses in the programming leadership, as evidenced by not a lot of new coming out of there. Lots of resting on laurels: "We win Emmys." No one cares if nobody's watching! Trapped by the nonsensical bureaucratic imperatives set by PBS and CPB. Lack of urgency--things can take a long time there. The board is kind of a sleeper board. Need some younger and more diverse voices who can dig into their pockets AND are willing to question the leadership and demand more of this org. And make more things happen. The place has a lot of people counting time until they can retire or want to change their lifestyle. Not too many people there are wanting to set the world on fire.

    Advice to Management

    This place has a lot of heft and potential and brand equity that is underutilized. Make some hard choices, make a few big bets, and make a cogent case for those bets. Market to multiple audiences. Short of that, cut your losses on stupid ideas and set aside some R&D money to try smaller but new experiments. Figure out a way to be a more facile partner. Get in front of the PBS behemoth and work with your fellow stations for an alternate way of doing things--try to diminish PBS' power because they are competing with us. Find ways to keep your top performers. And know that if you stop giving increases to your people, they are going to assume that you don't care if they leave. So don't be surprised when the ones who can leave, do; and stop blaming your managers! If you don't have a vision, AND you don't have a path for people, AND you can't give them raises, they will eventually go, no matter how nice you are. That is, unless they are parking themselves there until retirement.... you have no shortage of those people. Is that the kind of place you want?

There are newer employer reviews for WNET
There are newer employer reviews for WNET

See Most Recent

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