There are newer employer reviews for Whiting-Turner

3 people found this helpful  

Knowledgeable and honest employees but benefits and promotions need to be revamped

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Project Engineer in Denver, CO
Current Employee - Project Engineer in Denver, CO

I have been working at Whiting-Turner

Pros

Knowledgeable and experienced people who know the construction business in and out. Are one of the few contractors who are honest, fair, and upfront with owners and subcontractors.

Cons

Annual compensation is well below the average. The company tries to leverage this with the fact that they have profit sharing, stock options and a pension plan. The profit sharing is not for part time employees, and full time employees cannot start receiving profit sharing until they have been with the company for over two years. Stock options are also not available until employees are 'vested' for two years. And once they finally received the stock options, employees cannot cash in the stock until after 15 years. All the employees refer to the stock options as the golden handcuffs. If you quit or are fired before the 15 year period, you give up all your rights to the stock. Overall the benefits are ALL long term. Very few short term benefits for younger employees. Whiting-Turner has been around for over 100 years and the benefit package probably has not changed since day one.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Pay newer employees what they are worth. Consider offering more short term financial benefits for employees including more vacation days. This will attract younger and intelligent talent. PRAISE. Dont be afraid to praise someone for something good they have done. Whether that be a bonus, whiting-turner merchandise, golf lessons, awards, email recognition, or just a verbal THANK YOU!

Approves of CEO

64 Other Employee Reviews for Whiting-Turner (View Most Recent)

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  1. 10 people found this helpful  

    "Live to Work" is the motto here...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Project Manager in New Haven, CT
    Current Employee - Project Manager in New Haven, CT

    I have been working at Whiting-Turner

    Pros

    Experience of being trained in multiple areas (bidding, estimating, scheduling, managing subcontractors, etc.) give you the overall picture of a how to run a job from soup to nuts- much different than competitors who pigeon hole you into just being an "estimator" or "scheduler".
    The people you work with are generally pretty good people (both in and out of work), assuming they are not the dead weight in the company or trying to climb the company ladder and stepping on anyone and everyone on their way to do it. Working for the company 5 years ago was actually pretty decent. Now? I don't think they realize how many employees are half way out the door...and we do nothing to stop the good ones from leaving. We practically hold the door open for them to leave because the mindset from upper management is "You won't find better than us". Actually, we can and we slowly are.

    Cons

    Management is very old school- "live to work" went out about 20 years ago. Yes- construction has never been a 9 to 5 job, but when your protocol is inefficient and requires employees to triplicate information in various databases or generate multiple reports on a monthly basis because Sr. management won't look it up in said database, who is left to actually run the construction project we didn't have enough GCs to man in the first place? Efficiency, although preached, is never something the company is aggressive about resolving- especially if there is a cost associated with it. The ability to make quick, efficient decisions doesn't happen- we can build buildings quicker than we can resolve internal inefficiencies. There is a huge gap between levels of PE's to APMs to PM and in the higher PM levels (3+ to senior) as well. We make a better chorus line than a cheerleading pyramid with our hierarchy. Those who work hard and have stuck with the company are pushed to work longer hours, travel (unless you are one of the "lucky ones" who've never travelled for the company), and give up all semblance of a personal life with either no or minimal compensation, bonuses, profit sharing, etc. When it comes to hiring- again- our inability to make quick decisions means we are hiring the "B Team" because the "A Team" has already been scooped up by competitors. We wait too long to hire PEs and then stick them on a project and expect them to run the whole thing their 2nd week of work. We should have been hiring and training them 2 years ago so we could have them ready to work when needed. Quality of some employees is way below par. Throughout the recession, the company declared they "would not layoff any good people", we didn't lay off the bad ones either. Approval for reimbursement of classes, certifications, etc. takes an army. What once was the company standard of training falls by the way side with the cancelled training sessions month after month (although we still use our "monthly training" schpeel as a selling point in presentations). Advocate program has gone by the way side since there were costs associated with it. The focus has become to maintain the relationship, but pretty much at your own cost, unless you fight and make a stink about it. Who has time to fight these smaller battles when your project is a 60 hour a week job plus you're travelling 2 hours to work one way each day and you want to have a personal life? Travel packages for those out of town no longer take care of the employees for their sacrifice. I shouldn't be paying the company to work out of town, nor should it take months to reimburse employees for out of pocket costs associated with a temporary relocation.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Say "Thank You" to your employees and come out of your offices once in awhile. We've helped you get to where you are, so it goes a long way for the employees to see that their work and sacrifice is appreciated, especially when no other compensation is given to them- at least try and keep the morale up by recognizing and (gasp!) becoming more involved in the projects to at least know employee names (first and last) and status of the work (which may also eliminate us having to generate at least 1 weekly report?). Doing it once a year at the annual business meeting isn't acceptable. Get out and visit the job sites, not just when there are issues. Maybe check out the quiet employees- the ones that aren't in your office everyday giving you "face time". If they are in your office, who is actually running the project? I think it goes without saying that if they have that much time, why aren't they out networking and going after the next job? Much of the networking and job finding is left to those of us with the 60 hour work week. If you give reviews to employees, then thats how their raises and promotions should be issued. Telling the employees they are doing great and ultimately having their fate decided by a secretive process doesn't help the company improve the performance of its employees- isn't that the ultimate goal? To actually HAVE the best employees in the world and not just say it? When the company does make the decisions to promote, let their coworkers know. They deserved it, right!?!? Getting promoted is something people should be recognized for, especially since they earned it. Instead its all secretive as to who got promoted. If there are people who disagree with who got promoted (let's face it, there are ALWAYS those people) it doesn't matter whether you announce the promotions or they find out through water cooler chat- they are still going to have an issue. Take the dead weight to task- perhaps get an HR department to help deal with dead weight/ inadequate performance issues if being sued is slowing you down. Just think- less dead weight means more stock for you, right? The rest of us are starting to have back issues from carrying all that dead weight. If safety is the # 1 priority of the company (aside from making money), why not look into having a vision and dental plan as a part of the medical insurance? You can't spot safety issues with bum eyes...

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
  2.  

    Great experience to learn, grow and develop within the construction industry.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Intern in Raleigh, NC
    Current Employee - Intern in Raleigh, NC

    I have been working at Whiting-Turner

    Pros

    They provide great benefits and keep rewarding you the longer you stay with the company. Also they employees Whiting-Turner employes are smart, motivated, and willing to do what it takes to get the job complete. Also they have great company culture which makes you feel like your part of the team the moment you get there. Lastly they are a great nationally recognized company to work for which allows you to learn a lot from the whole experience.

    Cons

    The starting salary is not as high as other companies within the industry. Also they don't offer housing reimbursement for entry level positions if you have to relocate.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep up the good work. The company has strong leadership and explains why Whiting-Turner keeps growing larger each year. Also it has great company culture so don't change anything that can damage such a great reputation.

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
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