Worldwide Refinishing Systems

www.dreammaker-remodel.com
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There are newer employer reviews for Worldwide Refinishing Systems

1 person found this helpful

Lots of promises unfulfilled

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

I worked at Worldwide Refinishing Systems

Pros

Always has forward looking projects going and future improvements planned. Marketing material is somewhat generric but better than competitors have.

Cons

Future improvements don't arrive soon enough to make a difference and seem to lag the competition.
Weekely francshise fee too high.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Need to utilize technology more to stay ahead of competition. Establish a standardized database of uniform costs to better complete estimates.

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  1. 1 person found this helpful

    Letting out the truth about how sub-contractors are treated when working for a Stafford home remodeler is long overdue.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Contractor - Designer in Stafford, TX
    Former Contractor - Designer in Stafford, TX

    I worked at Worldwide Refinishing Systems as a contractor (more than a year)

    Pros

    The owner of DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen in Stafford, Texas lets you work your own hours. Only independent sub-contractors work there. The showroom can be used to guide home owners through the finish selection process. Read the "Cons" to see why this is not a very good "Pro".

    Cons

    Having worked side by side to the owner of DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen of Stafford for a year has shed a new meaning to the term "help" to me. Help is there, but at a cost to your own profit on a remodeling job.
    The owner helps his designers "reel" in customers by telling homeowners things they want to hear. Including but not limited to how quickly a remodel job can be done. The designers are then left to: prepare the bid, complete the design, prepare the job proposal, get the contract signed, collect all payments, procure all materials, and conduct on-going site management. I've even had to find subs to do work on an "as needed" basis (without payment for my services). The pressure is so high to get a signed contract (it being the only way to get paid), the company owner will occasionally step in to help keep a customer from "walking" out before they sign a contract.
    Anything that goes wrong is never the company owner's fault. The owner pays only rock bottom fees for labor. If not possible, guess who takes the hit? You guessed it, the designer (I cannot speak for his subs, but....). Any job that goes over budget is always taken out of the designer's final pay. This makes the company's commission structure a false representation of a decent paying job. It also leaves the designer "sticking her own neck out" with a chance of failure, not the remodeling company.
    The "reel-in" process begins with a mandatory contract designers must sign. If a job's final adjusted gross profit margin drops below a certain percentage (a very high percentage for industry standards), the designer gets zero dollars for completing the job (I know this isn't fair, what I would like to know is if it's legal). However, the designer's work load is not relieved, keeping a very busy schedule to assure the current job gets done right leaves little time to secure new jobs. This redefines an "honest day's pay for an honest day's work". Yet the "designer" does ALL the work w/ little help from the company owner. If too much "help" is requested, the owner takes part of the designer's commission to pay himself; nowhere in the designer's contract is this written (there is PLENTY built into the spreadsheet for this). Because the designer is responsible for ordering ALL finish materials (nails and equipment are supplied by general sub-contractors), it seems to me there should be a "check point" to rely on accuracy, but there is none. When extra materials are ordered, the profit margin drops affecting the designer's final commission to a point of no commission at all. No hourly pay either.
    Because the showroom is not always staffed, a scheduled material delivery might not get delivered. Thus, delaying the remodel job even more.
    All labor subs hired work for other companies, and are therefore not reliable to get your remodel job completed in the timely manner. When the home owner gets mad at the designer for their remodel taking too long to complete, the company owner steps in as the "hero" to smooth things out. Again, with a cost to the designer!
    Working for DreamMaker Bath & Kitchen (aka Four Points Construction) has been the worst job of my entire career.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Run away from this company and do not look back!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
  2. Not so dreamy working for them

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Kitchen and Bath Designer in Sarasota, FL
    Former Employee - Kitchen and Bath Designer in Sarasota, FL

    I worked at Worldwide Refinishing Systems

    Pros

    Freedom in design and sales approach.
    No micro-managing

    Cons

    COmmission Only compenstation without any health benefits. Limited line of products for customer to select from. Profit margin sequed toward the advantage of local owners with very litile profit shared amoungst sale force or tradesmen. Very little production or administraive support.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be less short sighted about profits and look at what investments in personal and customer base can afford in the long term.

    Doesn't Recommend
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