There are newer employer reviews for Youth Villages

1 person found this helpful  

WeWew

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Memphis, TN
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Memphis, TN

I have been working at Youth Villages full-time for more than 5 years

Pros

Managers really care about their employees. We try to have fun in the middle of our hard work.

Cons

Some positions in the company make it challenging to have a good work/life balance. This is something managers are constantly working on.

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

134 Other Employee Reviews for Youth Villages (View Most Recent)

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  1. 6 people found this helpful  

    Overworked, underpaid, seriously underappreciated, and not given any opportunities for advancement or change.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Family Intervention Specialist
    Current Employee - Family Intervention Specialist

    I have been working at Youth Villages full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    There is a vast amount of experience to be had if you can stick it out long enough to learn. A small percentage of families we serve are actually amenable to receiving help and will make some positive changes. You'll meet some amazing, generous people who genuinely do want to help families and think (erroneously) this is the way to accomplish it.

    Cons

    I've worked with Youth Villages for five years as an intercept counselor (or intervention specialist, or whatever we're calling it these days). During that five years, opportunities for growth and advancement have been extremely limited because management and administration are built, almost entirely, on office politics, cliques better suited to middle schoolers, and women that clearly didn't get enough of being the mean girls when they were younger. If you don't want to play the game, you're never going to get anywhere. Frequently, the people in charge will have less education and experience than you, but they'll have better connections and social positioning, which is clearly what this company values.

    You will be expected to work long, long days without support, recognition, or compensation. You will be expected to drive all over creation to meet with families that may or may not want your help, and you may be asked to literally stalk these people if they don't seem immediately on board with services. Paperwork and deadlines are ridiculous, and again, don't expect anyone to give you help, or cut you a break. Just because you worked until midnight is no excuse for not staying up a few more hours to complete paperwork. You do have vacation that you can take, but you had better be prepared to work twice as hard before and after you plan to take off in order to make sure all tasks are accomplished and your clients are safe and settled, because no one is picking up the slack while you're gone.

    The bottom line, whether or not you like it, is money. Administration will endorse a lot of questionable ethics in order to keep clients, exploit insurance companies, and to make sure the numbers are still looking good regardless of whether or not they're reflecting reality. There is a very, very high value placed on sounding positive and being "strength-focused," even at the expense of admitting that some things are impossible to accomplish, that the job is stressful, and that the reality of some clients' situations means that we're not the best fit for getting them the help they need.

    Long story short? If you have absolutely zero clinical experience and you're fresh out of school, have no children or spouse or outside responsibilities, this isn't a bad place to start. You'll gain a lot of experience quickly. This isn't, however, a long term career option unless you're willing to manipulate your way into administration by playing the game. Get in, learn some valuable lessons, and get out before you burn out.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Consider practicing what you preach, because pitching a lot of pretty words about work/life balance and positive relationships and strengths doesn't go too far when you're ignoring the needs of people below you, actively punishing anyone who dares speak up or mentions that they're struggling, and spending more time giggling and gossiping than offering real support when it's desperately needed. We're all adults and professionals. Maybe you could act like it.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 4 people found this helpful  

    Organizations makes a lot of money, but doesn't reinvest any of it back into staffing

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Youth Villages full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Great coworkers, good stepping stone into direct care work

    Cons

    Long hours, no breaks. Very little support from management. Lots of physically unsafe situations and many staff on workers comp due to injuries. Lots of political pull to get promoted leaves incompetent people in charge

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Make an effort to retain the staff who have worked for over a year, whether by actual raises or basic supports to provide a possibility for success

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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