There are newer employer reviews for Youth Villages
There are newer employer reviews for Youth Villages

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Challenging

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

I worked at Youth Villages part-time (More than 3 years)

Pros

You have much opportunity to make a difference in creative ways.

Cons

Long hours are often required and expected.

Other Employee Reviews for Youth Villages

  1. Helpful (5)

    Great experience, but comes at a price...

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Family Intervention Specialist
    Former Employee - Family Intervention Specialist
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Youth Villages full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The reason I remained with the company for so long was because of the work I was able to do with families. No other position would allow you to spend so much time with a family and do intensive therapy on this level. As a result, you really do get to see the family dynamics, use strategic and structural therapies, and see how you can make a difference in their lives. Certain consultants were extremely passionate about their jobs, and their enthusiasm was admirable and contagious. This is always a benefit/"pro" wherever you are. People may complain about the pay, but I found it to be fairly decent... perhaps this is due to the lower cost of living where I reside. Starting salary with a masters degree is $32,000, with pay raises up to $36,000 and then $39,000 for the first and second years. Mileage reimbursement is nice, and my monthly reimbursement check would occasionally be more than my monthly salary; however, the reimbursement is $0.42 and significantly lower than the national standard. There is a certain level of flexibility in scheduling, which can be a pro and a con. You have to schedule sessions when your families can meet, and if they can only meet with you after 6pm through the week then you're looking to have a session three times per week from 6-7 and get home around 8 to start your paperwork. On the other hand, if you have a personal appointment it can be easy to pencil that in your schedule and set sessions around that appointment. There were also quite a few weeks I was able to get all of my sessions and paperwork completed by Thursday night, so I essentially had Friday off (for a three day weekend).

    Cons

    There is no work/life balance in this position. I accepted the job knowing there would not be a balance, but I didn't realize how little management would care about it or how bad it would really be. I frequently worked 60-80 hours per week, on call rotation depended on how many people were on your team and at times meant I was on call every other weekend, and of course you are on-call 24/7 through the week for the families and do not get flex time when you are called out at 2am. I had several coworkers who would be up all night for an emergency and would be expected to still meet for their 8am sessions. I was in several unsafe situations with families who were potentially dangerous and was still expected to meet with them in the home. Management would also frequently advocate for certain kids to remain at home when they were a danger to themselves or others, all for the sake of "success rates". This would also lead to management encouraging specialists to enable the families and use services as a crutch instead of promoting self-sufficiency, which would ultimately have led to long-term success. The dress code could use some work as well... I understand that employees need to present with a professional image, but this can be done with a nice pair of jeans just the same. Plus, when we dress professionally - dress pants, nice shoes, nice shirt - it sometimes places us at a level above the families and can be more difficult to engage with them as a result. And when you are wearing nice (and more expensive) clothes and have roaches crawling up your pant legs and have to watch where you sit because of animal/human feces all around, it defeats the purpose. Pay raises for licensures are minimal... after working for two years on a clinical license the pay raise is only $1,000 a year, compared to other companies offering a $4000-6000 raise. I also find it interesting this page asks my opinion of the CEO, Pat Lawyer. I have no opinion of him as I met him once and he was rather likeable and passionate about the company. I do find it frustrating that he sends out email newsletters with "What I am Reading This Month" and a suggestion for a book he is currently reading... as if his employees have the time or energy to read a book after they finish their 15-hour work day.

    Advice to Management

    Hire supervisors who are professional and ethical, and who aren't an embarrassment to the company or to the individuals working under them. Regional and state supervisors appear to be fairly competent, but the direct supervisors could use some further development. In some instances, they believe it is better to fill the position with a warm body rather than wait for someone more competent to fill it. It also wouldn't hurt to send some of them to an ethics training once in a while... especially when they make recommendations that could result in lawsuits, both for the company and for the individual clinician.


  2. Helpful (6)

    Youth Villages makes a lot of money, but you won't see any of it

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Teacher Counselor/Supervisor in Arlington, MA
    Current Employee - Teacher Counselor/Supervisor in Arlington, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Youth Villages full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Good experience meeting people working direct care.

    Cons

    The pay is awful. They pay the same in Massachusetts as they do in Memphis which fails to compensate the much higher cost of living. You won't move up unless you know the right people. Physically unsafe situations. Management does nothing to support.

    Advice to Management

    Make even a small effort to retain staff.


There are newer employer reviews for Youth Villages
There are newer employer reviews for Youth Villages

See Most Recent

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