There are newer employer reviews for eBay
There are newer employer reviews for eBay

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Helpful (1)

Could be worse, especially during these difficult times.

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Vancouver, BC (Canada)
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Vancouver, BC (Canada)
Recommends
No opinion of CEO

Pros

I get paid pretty well for the work i do. There are definitely benefits that you don't see in the industry in Vancouver. Things like free pop, bagel day and little things like that. It is more in line with .com companies in silicon valley. Our medical, dental and vision benefits are also pretty good. Inline with others or a bit above the average.

Cons

Career advancement is tough due to the high number of employees, resulting in high competition. The support given to the CSRs sometimes is lacking. For a technology company, it doesn't invest quite enough in technology to help CSRs support the community.

Advice to Management

Listen to your front line reps more.

Other Employee Reviews for eBay

  1. Helpful (6)

    eBay - an interesting case study

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    The co-workers. The people I work with are the best thing about being at eBay. The casual work environment is nice. The benefits are standard, though it's good to have them. The starting wage is good, though there are not any significant increases after that.

    Cons

    The 'Big Brother" monitoring (eQuality) is disconcerting, as well as having to account for every minute of your day by punching into a task. ("Let's see how long this person was in the bathroom for") Over the past year, morale has dropped severely, and it is not simply due to the economy. Sellers are not happy. Buyers are not happy. Employees are not happy. Why? Primarily because none of the above are being listened to by eBay Executives. Huge decisions (such as the removal of Helpline, outsourcing of entire departments) are made with no imput from the people on the front lines. Workflows are changed every few weeks. Senior Management cannot seem to make up their minds. Good people are then shuffled into positions that they never wanted to do, and many have ended up leaving. Employees work hard at eBay. They deserved to recognized and compensated for their work and have opportunities for career growth. If given at all, eBay raises are low by industry standards to begin with (1.5 - 2% is common) and you cannot retain good people this way. I have a number of co-workers who did brilliant work and then received a 2% raise - this was before the economy tanked. The leadership is lacking at the very top. If it didn't affect so many people, the constant changes would almost be amusing. An example: windorphins. We no longer push 'windorphins' - we push Amazon-like sales.

    Advice to Management

    The amount of changes internally and externally on the site need to stop. Listen to your employees, don't just nod, smile and throw away our suggestions. Your employees on the front lines hear feedback from members. Listen to what we have to say. We hear it directly from the very people you’re trying to keep on the site. Account security work should not be outsourced, but it is. There is no reason for this and it's a concern for obvious reasons. To Senior Management: please use the site. See how flawed the DSR's are (we are pushing good sellers off the site because buyers had a good experience, but chose to rate a seller with a 3 or 4 out of honest ignorance). The one sided feedback is not working. For Management, having to buy/sell should be mandatory, and not just once or twice. Work on the actual retention of employees. Increase incentives to stay. You will not be able to "reignite the core" by having employees start and leave within the same year. My last bit of advice is varied: we need to go back to our roots. Simplify the cluttered site. Bring back equal feedback. Stop increasing fees. Encourage small sellers to stay. That was part of what made eBay great - being able to find and bid on absolutely anything. We are not Amazon. We cannot be Amazon. We need to go back to being eBay.


  2. Helpful (4)

    It didn't use to be all bad, really.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Customer Service Representative in Burnaby, BC (Canada)
    Former Employee - Customer Service Representative in Burnaby, BC (Canada)
    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    The compensation was fair for the job. The benefits were rather good as well. The actual co-workers were also, for the most part, a solid group of people with whom I was honoured to work. Plus, it looks pretty good to have "eBay" on a resumé.

    Cons

    I left during the time of Meg. Talking with my friends who are still at eBay (although that is fewer and fewer people as time goes on) and reading the comments that other people have left here, I got out at the right time. Much of my time with the company was good, but even during my few years, customer service went downhill markedly. At first, only a few things were outsourced (mainly very basic customer service email questions), and the outsourcing companies were still in Canada. As time went on, more and more things were outsourced - more complex customer service emails, Live Chat, International questions, selling tool questions, image service questions, etc. Mumbai and the Philippines got more and more of the workload, and the quality loss was apparent. Emails could be routed for weeks between service partners, answers often had tangential or no relationship to the questions asked, and the unhappiness of the customers was obvious for anyone to see. The niggling over metrics also increased remarkably. People were fired for missing productivity metrics by 1 or 2 percent (quite literally). The productivity metrics increased by leaps and bounds. If you got a bad quality review which was not in fact an error on your part, too bad so sad - the process to overturn a bad quality review was to appeal it to the quality team. And since the quality team was penalized for having quality review overturned, as you can imagine, reversals of quality reviews almost never happened. And customer satisfaction? You were ranked on both your satisfaction and eBay's satisfaction, so if the site was down or some feature wasn't working, that was a strike against you. Management's decisions also became more divorced from reality as time went on. eBay Express was a wonderful example of that. No one wanted Amazon Lite, but we were going to get it anyway, come hell or high water. Meanwhile, real innovation went the way of the dodo. Now that Meg is gone, the decisions have just gotten worse and worse. Getting rid of Helpline was one of the dumbest customer service decisions ever made by eBay. You had a group of people with a massive knowledge base of eBay centralized in one location, ready to give support to anyone from Mumbai to the top of the customer service chain, and you threw them to the wind. The logic fails me on that decision.

    Advice to Management

    Listen to your customer service team. Just listen. And use the site. It'll probably help you stop making decisions that are so foreign to what eBay is. Finally, write a question into eBay support and see how long it takes for it to get resolved.


There are newer employer reviews for eBay
There are newer employer reviews for eBay

See Most Recent

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