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2 people found this helpful  

Where great dreams go to die™.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

I worked at ePrize full-time (more than an year)

Pros

- Most of the Management positions are exceptional when it comes to the people they supervise.
- A great deal of the people that work there are friendly, and some are extremely smart and talented at what they do.
- A kind of work experience you won't get almost anywhere else. Employees learn a vast array of skills regarding dealing with clients, marketing via promotions, and managing projects in their own way.
- An open atmosphere, a relaxed dress code, and a lenient alcohol policy. It's not uncommon to see people enjoying some brews in the afternoon.
- A deck on the 4th floor. It's always nice to take a few minutes or have lunch outside in the summer.
- The benefits are pretty good. Health, dental, 401k plan, paid time off, the whole 9 yards.
- Ability to work from home when you need to.
- Variable Compensation. You earn a fraction of a cent for every dollar the company makes, paid out quarterly.

Cons

Unfortunately, there are a great deal of negatives to the job, but I feel they are important to note here.
- Extremely demanding no matter what position you apply for. Just because the work day ends at 5 does not mean you are done working. The high-levels of stress can really weigh in on people, and co-workers sometimes get aggravated or testy after a long week.
- Compensation is significantly below market averages, especially for vital positions, such as development. Combined with stringent hiring qualifications, it leads to a short-handed teams.
- Massive turnover due to the factors listed here. ePrize has epitomized the revolving door. In 1 years' time, I saw nearly half the development team across the company change due to departures. Any employment length longer than 1 year is considered an excellent retention rate.
- Constant change. The structure and nature of the company is chaotic at times as a result of all the departures.
- Immense pressure on the development team to build, complete, and maintain multiple projects at the same time. These projects are often inadequately scoped, resourced, or documented. Requirements can change on the fly, and clients request the most ridiculous things.
- Overly-aggressive sales targets. The sales team is given incentive to up-sell products with whatever they can and undercut timing estimates in an effort to meet the break-neck, unrealistic goals. This cascades down and causes even simple projects to become cumbersome, gaudy, and painful to develop.
- Scheduling. The most grievous problem. People in development positions will typically see allocated time over 8 hours in a given day. Normal days consist of 10-16 hours of things that may or may not need doing. The overbooked time is not actively re-allocated at the end of the day, it is assumed to have been completed. If you hadn't guessed, this tends to burn out perfectly good employees quickly.
- Training. There is no substantial individualized training for new hires. The hiring strategy is to find the smartest people who will work for the lowest amount of money, drop them in, then tell them to ask a lot of questions and figure it out.
- A dismal company vision. It can be extremely difficult to stay motivated when the future aspirations are: keep doing the same thing and make the company more money.
- Quality. With the tight time constraints, corners get cut, and quality suffers. The Quality Assurance team are not quite technical enough or lack the tools to truly analyze the products in-depth. If it looks like it works it will probably pass. Clients find defects in live promotions and complain, then upper management has the nerve to ask why quality is so low.
- A broken, dated, unwieldy core product and technologies. The framework which once allowed ePrize to seize opportunities by providing template solutions has now become it's crutch. An infrastructure that was not intended to be customized or excessively extended is now being used to add new functionality that introduces new problems upon release. Entirely custom projects are sold to clients under the impression that anything is possible with the magic of the build team who is left to solve the puzzle without ever being involved in the pre-sale.
- Work environment. What would otherwise be perceived as a boost to collaboration is actually a incredible detriment to the workplace. Almost everyone sits at an open desk of a group of desks called a 'pod'. Since there are always open conversations, client calls, and people moving about the place, it can be distracting if you are trying to focus on something that requires concentration. If that wasn't enough, people can walk over to talk to you, send you and instant message, or email you. Some days I could spend half the day simply responding to emails. People have been know to leave their desks just so they can get some work done, or end up buying noise cancelling headphones.
- The culture has dissolved into corporate mentality. What once felt like a new age, innovative, and close-knit organization is now run by what a select few people who look to generate more revenue in the immediate horizon. Many of the people who had been at ePrize for years have left because the ideals have changed. The loss of experienced talent is painfully evident.
- Different regions with different practices and styles. The different teams handle their projects each in their own way, which has its advantages and disadvantages. They would benefit from sharing the approaches that worked for them.
- Ultimately, the biggest downfall is that the company doesn't feel like it wants to retain the talent it struggles so hard to find. It's a huge waste, and while management is certainly aware of it, it has not actively taken steps to reduce the turnover.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

- Iron out the scheduling system.
- Seek advice from within. There should be constant feedback from the different teams used to steer the direction of the company.
- Improve the working conditions. Invest in your employees and they will enrich the company.
- Establish common best practices for the different teams, and encourage cross-discipline roles within the company. Everyone needs to understand how all the pieces of the company fit together.
- Formalize training, not only in soft skills but especially focus in on technical areas. It is critical to understand how the technology of the product you are selling functions. There is a need to adequately prepare fresh talent.
- Offer competitive wages or pay overtime. The people are worth the price.
- Put emphasis on the outstanding individuals and empower them rather than set more aggressive financial goals. Focus should be on extraordinary people or deeds, not record profits.
- ePrize could stand to lose a few of its poisonous small clients. While it is counter-intuitive, there are a few clients that are actually costing more than they are paying. These are usually the same clients that cause people to depart.

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

53 Other Employee Reviews for ePrize (View Most Recent)

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Marketing company... know what to expect.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Software Engineer
    Current Employee - Software Engineer

    I have been working at ePrize

    Pros

    Relatively stable & steady place to work. Good learning experience. The people who do the actual work are usually very skilled and good people. Good place if you like marketing. Good place for business people.

    Cons

    Too much work, overtime, not enough people, quickly lose any sense of work being fun, tiring, stressful, lots of busy work & putting out fires. Management seems unaware or unwilling to fix the large, obvious issues.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Hire more people, charge clients more money, get the work week down to 40 hours for everyone, stop accepting bad clients, don't heavily depend on large clients.

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 3 people found this helpful  

    Erratic, unpredictable

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at ePrize

    Pros

    When it's fun it's fun at ePrize. Nice offices, interesting events, flexible environment where you can kick back and listen to music while you're working,

    Cons

    Total lack of self awareness. The company thinks it's the best in all aspects, but doesn't have enough experience to realize just how bad it really is. Software sucks, talent sucks, quality sucks, and senior leadership sucks.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Hire some professionals. Get rid of dead wood. Focus on building a sales organization that actually sells. Pick a course and stick with it.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
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