Gaba Corporation

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Gaba Corporation Reviews

Updated November 19, 2014
Updated November 19, 2014
27 Reviews
3.0
27 Reviews
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  1.  

    Interview process

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Gaba Corporation

    Pros

    Flexible Hours so that you can chose when to work.
    Reasonable Pay

    Cons

    Monotonus work. It gets boring

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Treat their employees with a little bit more respect.

  2. 7 people found this helpful  

    Great for Part Timers, NOT So Great for Full-timers

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - English Instructor in Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)
    Former Employee - English Instructor in Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    I worked at Gaba Corporation full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    - Gaba is very flexible with your schedule; whether you prefer to teach all weekends or weekdays or both. Gaba allows you to pick and choose what days you want to work. Just keep in mind that if your are sponsored by Gaba you need to meet their quota on X number of lessons needed to be taught every month, so no slacking!!

    -Each Gaba office has a very supportive Japanese staff that will help you change, switch, or cancel lessons. If you are on their good side, they will recommend clients to take your lesson and will even fill in walk-in clients to your empty lesson slots.

    -40 minute one on one lessons, where the clients get to pick and choose what style of a lesson they want; whether it be standard text book lessons, conversational lessons, or work or school-related help. It really depends on the clients at the end, so if they choose to do either one or all, just be flexible enough to help them in the best of your ability.

    -If you are star instructor and have high client ratings, you may have the opportunity to move above the grunt instructor level and become an office manager. There are also other departments within Gaba corporation, but they are only available if someone leaves; so keep in mind that there aren't too many available slots other than studio management positions open.

    - Helpful studio managers who were former star instructors; These guys were instructors who acquired a high average of monthly lessons and client ratings, so don't underestimate these guys. They are here to help you in any way possible. Be on their good side, and they will help recommend which time and days are best to keep your lesson availability open.

    - Great for a part-time job. If you are working full-time at another English teaching company or Japanese company, working part-time with Gaba on weekday nights or weekend mornings will be GREAT as an added sum of money to your monthly paycheck. Most of the demand for lessons are usually on weekday nights (5pm-11pm) and weekend mornings ( 9am-4pm), so if you're ok with doing this after work and on the weekends, than good for you! You'll be making a lot of money on top of your normal job.

    Cons

    -No help on housing, bank account, health insurance, and telephone set up. Being a Gaba instructor is best suited for seasoned/veteran English teachers who have all the three things set up while living in Japan. Gaba Human Resources will even let you know in advance that they are not responsible for helping you set up your living essentials. So... it's best to already be living in Japan so that you can get by with finding housing, setting up a bank account, or creating a new telephone number. This wouldn't apply if you have friends or family who are already living there and who could help you set up those things.

    -As a Gaba instructor, you are hired as a contractor. Which means you are not eligible to worker's compensation or any work related benefits. You need to fulfill a set number of lessons in order for management to extend your work visa and contract with Gaba.

    -On the topic of being a contractor, you are PAID BY EACH LESSON YOU TEACH. You are not offered lessons or assigned to a set schedule of lessons. You need to perform well as a teacher and a salesman to keep happy clients reserving your lesson schedule every day. There's a lot of pressure for first-timers and newbies who have to deal with teaching as a skill as well as keeping clients happy and loyal. If you are on the good side of Gaba's support staff, they could recommend clients to you and fill in walk-ins to your empty availability slots. Therefore, again, I STRESS that this job is best for VETERAN TEACHERS.

    - HIGH COMPETITION among instructors in every studio. If you under perform instructors will like you, if you overperform instructors will envy and hate you. I vividly remember my first month there, instructors would make casual snide and insensitive remarks about how they've been teaching their coworker's usual clients. It ended up becoming a popularity contest on who taught whose clients and how often they teach them. Thankfully my studio wasn't too bad, but I've heard some horror stories where office drama would occur due to somebody stealing somebody else's clients. You really can't blame them for being good or popular teachers, but that's just the way it is when you're messing with someone's paycheck. Remember an instructor is paid by every lesson they teach, you steal someone's usual client and they'll get pretty pissed; So you really have to be insensitive to that and tell yourself that you need to live and eat.

    -On the topic of high competition, instructors don't really bond too well after work unless they are pretty good friends. There were some instructors who were pretty cool and often invited instructors to go drinking at the local Hub, but it's not too often compared to how Japanese coworkers socialize after work. It's pretty sad when you have a drunk client come in and tell you about how he/she had a blast with his/her coworkers and will meet up with them again after your 40 minute lesson, while you have to go leave work without doing those things with your coworkers. Word of advice, make friends outside work and develop a good relationship with all the other instructors so they will invite you out to drink lol.

    - On the topic of socializing, Gaba does hold holiday parties but you really need to find a way to meet friends outside of Gaba. You can not depend on Gaba to help you meet people. Yes, you can develop good friendships with loyal and usual clients but remember that you are an instructor and they are the client. You really REALLY SHOULDN'T develop any kind of BOYFRIEND/GIRLFRIEND relationships with them and HOOKING UP WITH CLIENTS IS AN ABSOLUTE NO! Because if it ends badly, it'll be your lessons that will be effected as well as the RUMORS that the client may spread about you to other clients. I had two usual clients who were infatuated with me but I never did anything outside class with them.

    -Since you are a contractor, you may run into some creepy clients who take your lesson to only watch you and study your interests and hobbies; and than casually invite you out to dinner or drinks. There were some male/female instructors who complain about how creepy some clients were and how they would love to talk about lude and sexual topics. Since you are a contractor and not an employee of Gaba, the staff will only care about keeping the client happy. *TIP if you ever encounter a creepy client just tell yourself that your sucking the money out of the sucker and he/she is the one whose paying money to take your lesson rather than using it on an escort.

    -Instructors range from all different ages and ethnicity and races. No problem with the diversity, but the age could be a bit of a nuisance. As a fresh face college graduate, my coworkers all saw me as the kid of the staff; so it was pretty hard for me to relate to those older & dumber instructors :]

    - Employment instability and a Lasting Career. I noticed an average low on morale among full-time instructors. Many instructors who were hitting their late 20s and early 30s may wonder about whether they want to continue working with Gaba due to the low job stability of being an instructor. A lot of older instructors end up teaching for Gaba part time while they continue doing full-time teaching with other companies or doing something completely unrelated to Teaching. There were a couple 26-27 year old instructors who would complain all day about working at Gaba and about how they don't know what they can do after they quite Gaba. *ADVICE: Please be ready and understand all the cons of working at this company and to LOVE TEACHING. If you're teaching in Japan because of the 'traveler's experience' than you probably shouldn't be working with Gaba fulltime. In fact you should be doing a JET program or some other public school related teaching job where you can get off at 4-5pm and do whatever you want afterwards.

    *Advice to fulltimers: find another job at a different English teaching company and work for Gaba part-time. Working for Gaba isn't bad but relying on the company to pay for your rent and food is not a healthy choice to make.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    -Offer help with housing, bank account and telephone set up.

    - try and get instructors to bond and socialize after work. Happy instructors mean better quality lessons!

    -listen to your instructor's problems and try your best to help them.

    Positive Outlook
  3. 1 person found this helpful  

    Growth Experience

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - English Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)
    Former Employee - English Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)

    I worked at Gaba Corporation as a contractor (more than a year)

    Pros

    Teaching English at Gaba is an excellent way to meet a lot of interesting businesspeople and learn about Japanese culture. Perfect job for new graduates looking to come to Japan. The experience will teach you how to get along with a very wide variety of people. Schedules are quite flexible, too.

    Cons

    It is fairly stressful to teach one person for 40 minutes straight. And the average teacher has over 5 lessons every day they come in to teach. Not a good job for grumpy or unsociable people. I met some teachers who just simply had zero charisma, and they and their students always seemed to have a bad time.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Give teachers a chance to move up within the company. I was constantly translating things for my Japanese coworkers in my Learning Studio, doing a ton of unpaid work just because I cared about maintaining a good office environment, but never got noticed by management or offered promotions based on my Japanese language ability. That is why I ended up leaving Gaba, despite being a very high-rated and popular teacher.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
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  5. 2 people found this helpful  

    Monotonous, Underpaid, Conflict of Interest between managers and instructors

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)
    Current Employee - Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)

    I have been working at Gaba Corporation as a contractor (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    The only 2 positive point about this work is that you can select your own schedule, and a possible place to park yourself for a few months until you get a real job. HOWEVER, you still have to keep in mind the supply/demand for certain times, as you don't get paid unless you teach.

    Cons

    Cons are everything else. I can't tell you how glad I am to be out of there.

    Let's start with the biggest con.

    I can not stress enough how stupid the whole system is in regards to the relationship with the manager and instructor. It is a Win/Lose relationship and a complete conflict of interest. Managers get a bonus based on how many bookings they get per month. So because of that, they want instructors to open as many lessons as possible. Sometimes they will tell you next month will be very busy and they are expecting many lessons for instructors to teach, so they encourage you to open many lessons. But that month may be dead. Because many instructors in your branch opened a lot of lessons, the supply of lessons are high, and the number of lessons the students want to take (the demand) could be very low. So you have to compete with the other instructors for those lessons. The management is happy because you opened many lessons and it gives the student a big advantage because they can pick and choose many instructors at various times. However, since there is no compensation for unbooked lessons in your schedule, you will lose. On the flip side, if there is a lot of demand for lessons from the students and few instructors, the management gets a lower bonus, but you will get a higher pay, because your booking ratio will be higher. This needs to be fixed so that it is a win-win scenario.

    Let's continue with the other Cons.

    - You are treated as a commodity. Anyone can teach English. There are even people who can't speak English properly teaching at Gaba, because they can be good entertainers, and they are personable. Although the Japanese laws are EXTREMELY strict with respect to firing people (so in order for you to get fired or your contract discontinued, you'd really have to do something stupid), they don't care if you leave and will not treat you like an asset, because there's always some other foreigner coming from some country to fill your position. So they hire basically anyone. And I don't mean they hire anyone with a reasonable amount of intelligence. They literally hire anyone because hiring a new instructor is not a cost to them. The company does not pay 1 yen to hire a new instructor. The amount of lessons in any given year is more or less fixed by the number of clients. This all gets dispersed between the instructors who get booked. If you don't get any bookings, you don't get paid. So if you are a terrible instructor with no bookings, that doesn't cost the company any money to hire that person.
    - Absolutely no financial security. The only time you get compensated is when your lessons are booked. If you open your schedule all day and you don't teach, your pay for that day is ZERO.
    - The schedule isn't as flexible as they say it is. The demand for client lessons are in the evenings (5:30pm until 10:45pm, or on weekends) which is the time that most people probably don't want to work. If you want to work in the daytime as an average instructor who gets average bookings, you will realistically get on average, about 3 or 4 lessons per day. This equates to 4500 to 6000 yen. So unless you are a superstar instructor, you will likely have to work during the weekends and weeknights to pay the bills.
    - The work is very monotonous. I can't tell you how many times I've answered the same questions from the clients. Yes, their goal is to learn English, and they will ask you questions to practice their English, however I feel like I want to blow my brains out after literally the same questions being asked 5000 times like "where are you from?" or "what is your favorite food". Because the student's English speaking skills are limited, they can only have basic conversations with you, which don't really stimulate your mind. This is not to say that it is the student's fault. They're paying to learn English and I have to provide that service... however, you can see how after having mind numbing conversations 5 days a week, the job becomes excruciatingly boring.
    - Management is terrible. They are very stingy. If they make a mistake in your schedule and you deserve your compensation from 1 particular class, you have to fight your way to get the money you deserve. Often times, the manager there will say that they can't do much because your compensation is based on the IT structure, and if their was an error, they can't create a fake client booking without throwing off the whole accounting system. So you'll try and escalate it to get it resolved so that on your pay stub, they can allocate that compensation in an "unbooked lesson" category, however it is 50/50 in my experience to get compensated on time, and I have to always fight my to get it. The manager is generally sympathetic and on your side, but because he/she has to fight for you to his upper management, it makes him look bad, and he/she is very reluctant to do it unless you nag, threaten to change teaching at a different branch, etc.
    - When you want to close an unbooked lesson, management will be very reluctant to do so, and will almost always guilt trip you into keeping it open. It got so frustrating once, I just straight up told my manager (you will never be able to guilt trip me into keeping my lessons open, so let's save both of us some energy and close the lesson when I ask you to). I suppose this one point could be in the "pro" section as you are allowed to close unbooked lessons at any time for any reason and take off early if your last lesson is unbooked. But again, you don't get paid for it, so that balances itself out.
    - You are inside a cubicle which is quite small. Japanese people in general have very low personal distance (in fact the smallest in the world) so they will often sit very close to you without knowing they are violating your personal space. Japanese people don't have a habit of covering their mouth when they sneeze or cough, so the amount of times I get sick is extremely high while working in Gaba compared to any other time. And I'm actually VERY healthy and almost never get sick. The school is a breeding ground for germs. (I know if you're reading this and have never worked here, you will look at this with skepticism, but once you start working here, you will know EXACTLY what I'm saying)
    - Staff room is usually quite messy. There is no cleaning staff, and you can see stains on the table for months before it gets cleaned sometimes.
    - Training is unpaid
    - Commuting expenses are unpaid. In Japan, all companies do this except Gaba.
    - All the computers block any social networking site or email. I can understand blocking social networking sites, adult sites, etc, but they go a little overboard with a lot of stuff. Especially since unbooked lessons are not compensated, why should they care if we use the internet. And often times, the manager will use email to communicate with instructors, but you won't be able to see their emails because they block email access, and they don't even give you your own company email address. A simple fix would be to give everyone a @gaba.co.jp email address and restrict it to only sending and receiving emails with the same domain name, but it's rather foolish that they can't even do that for their instructors.
    - The way to succeed in getting the most booked lessons is to be an ENTERTAINER, not a teacher. Most of the students (honest to God) don't even know why they are going to Gaba and learning English. They are usually socially awkward people that want to get out of the house but don't have that many friends, and need someone to listen to them and talk and want to have a little fun on the weekends, so they learn English at Gaba. So in order to get the most bookings, you have to be entertaining, and tell funny stories rather than teach English. If this is your thing, I'm not saying anyone should stop you from pursuing this.
    - Extremely limited career advancement opportunities. To bring up a hypothetical example, let's say I was somewhat introverted and didn't want to be an entertainer, but I have extensive experience in writing and designing. In order for me to advance my career opportunities, and get into the textbook writing department, they will judge you 85% based on your teaching evaluations. Again, if you are introverted and not an entertainer, the chances of you getting high evaluations from your students will be lower than someone who isn't a good teacher but entertaining and empathetic to your student's life problems. If you and the other guy applied for an open position (which is extremely limited and rare), I am willing to bet any amount of money that the entertainer will get the spot.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Above all, fix the conflict of interest between the instructor and ISL/ISM.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
  6. 3 people found this helpful  

    Lots of opportunities--if you work hard and are willing to toe the company line

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Instructor Support Leader in Tokyo (Japan)
    Current Employee - Instructor Support Leader in Tokyo (Japan)

    I have been working at Gaba Corporation full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    I started as an instructor and worked my way up to management. I was fortunate to have managers and coworkers who really cared about my development; I came in having a pretty tiny skill-set outside of teaching English, but in my time here I've learned a lot about sales, management, and even just how to function in an office environment. I keep my work and personal life pretty separate, but I've met some amazing people here--instructors, other managers, and also Japanese staff.

    Benefits are pretty standard--transportation costs, paid leave, and not too much overtime (for a Japanese company). My schedule is a lot less flexible than it was when I was an instructor, but I still have some input so I don't really feel constrained.

    The opportunities for promotion are there--up to a point.

    Cons

    The company goes through constant change. Usually I think it's a good thing, but one side effect is that the message can get diluted--people who have been around for a long time still try to hold on to the way things were years and years ago. That's true of instructors, managers, and Japanese staff alike. A lot of people who have been around for a long time hold negative views because they've had bad experiences in the past and they're skeptical of the efforts the company makes to ameliorate those issues.

    Work-life balance is generally pretty good, but it can get tricky because instructor management gets way more leeway than the Japanese staff and there can definitely be some resentment if you flaunt your privilege. Office politics plays a big role in the culture here.

    The opportunities for promotion are there, but they bottleneck sharply after a certain point. A lot of instructor support leaders quit because there's just nowhere for them to go.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    The biggest issue I see is that there's often a big dis-connect between senior management and the instructor base. It's our job to act as a go-between, but I don't feel that our input is taken as seriously as it sometimes needs to be.

    I also feel the Japanese staff need to be re-trained regarding how they view the instructors: they try to hold them to the same standards as full-time employees without any of the benefits, and it sometimes leads to a lot of resentment or misunderstanding.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
  7. 1 person found this helpful  

    Competitive but flexible and lucrative

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - English Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)
    Current Employee - English Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)

    I have been working at Gaba Corporation as a contractor (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    You can select your own schedule, though during certain hours it can be difficult to get a lot of lessons and therefore good income. However, if you can work evenings and weekends (say Tuesday to Saturday) you can build up a good client base and good income. There are also many ways to boost income through incentives if you are good. However, it can be competitive.

    Cons

    You have to compete with your fellow instructors to some extent which can lead to a slow start. If you can push through the first 6 months, it can turn into a very positive and lucrative experience.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Level the playing field between the most successful instructors and the up and comers. Due to the competitive nature of the job, some people find it difficult to increase their lesson rate and build a client base.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
  8. 1 person found this helpful  

    Autonomy, Mastery, and Purpose

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Certification Specialist
    Current Employee - Certification Specialist

    I have been working at Gaba Corporation full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Co-Workers: Work with people from all over the world and LEARN about their cultures and home countries.
    Work: The motto is "Helping people achieve their most audacious life goals" - if you recognize the fact that you can build up a client base and help those people with amazing life goals (travel, live abroad, new job, university research, etc.) through English education, you will love the job. Additionally you can LEARN from clients about Japan, their careers, interests, and so forth - great way to broaden your horizons.
    Schedule: Work as many or as few lessons as you'd like - depending on the contract type. The flexibility is amazing for those who want to travel and try their hand at other careers or freelance work. If you do it right, you can schedule a lot of time on the side.
    Pay: The pay isn't much at the start, but if you are dedicated, passionate, and open to additional responsibility you can make quite a bit.
    Advancement: As an Instructor you may max out your responsibilities - look to full-time opportunities.

    Cons

    Co-Workers: Egos - every job has them.
    Work: Some clients are more challenging than others - but who doesn't want a good challenge?
    Schedule: Not guaranteed to get clients coming to you - but if you want to be successful you've got to master what you do.
    Pay: Starting at 1,500yen per lesson. But that is more than minimum wage, and you get to live in Japan...

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Hold core principles higher than policy/process.
    Passionately communicate to applicants the people skills that are obtained in this line of work, and how those skills benefit them in future careers.
    Crowd source more effectively and efficiently ideas, tips, tools, techniques, and so forth that come from the over 1,000 contracted Instructors. Modern business is not about being top-down.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
  9. 6 people found this helpful  

    2 year instructor.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)
    Former Employee - Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)

    I worked at Gaba Corporation full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Choose your own schedule.
    Minimal personal investment once you're over the initial hurdle of how to run a lesson.
    Interesting for 6 months or so.
    Most of the students are very friendly.
    Some lesson studios have a good environment, but others don't.
    You get to meet many people, some are very interesting.

    Cons

    If you rub the management the wrong way they can make your life hell, this includes the Japanese staff. You might not have any lessons.
    You choose your schedule a month in advance so you have no way of attending any thing that's scheduled less than a month beforehand
    No support from management apart from banal advice.
    Unpaid training that isn't really helpful as the training staff are far removed from lesson realities.
    Once it becomes a grind it's boring, especially as the students are also rather dry and homogenous
    Some times you get very difficult students.
    You could end up with no lessons, especially if you're not friendly or you have no special expertise, that's a tough situation if it's your only job in a foreign country.
    If you want to take advantage of the ability to close your lessons, the staff might pressure you to keep them open, often passive aggressively.
    Morale is pretty low amongst the Japanese staff as they aren't paid very much, and are very much sales driven due to their somewhat unrealistic targets.
    The common area is often messy and unhygienic.
    You might meet some very unpleasant people, and if you're a girl you might be sexually harassed. Indeed, English conversation schools are often compared to ersatz hostess bars
    If you're sick, then you will be guilt tripped into coming to work, depending on the management. You won't be paid, of course, and there's really no formal procedure for calling in sick so it's ill-advised, lest you risk a black mark against your name which would mean less lesson recommendations.
    the visa-sponsorship process, involving a 3 month review period, is overhyped. Anybody who gets booked for lessons will get the visa. You're also supposed to work at least 160 lessons to continue your visa, but that's disingenuous as it is simply during the review period this has any practical effect as, having attained a visa, you may go anywhere you want -- you don't have to stay with the company; whereas the company would rather have you believe that in order to maintain your visa you need to continue putting in the requisite 160 hours.
    Students will make passes at you -- be ready.
    In order to make money you will have to work weekends and evenings, and/or early mornings. Daytime lessons are rare, and often reserved for longterm instructors (3-4+ years)

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop guilt tripping people if you are, instructors are contractually allowed to close lessons at any time they want.

  10. 1 person found this helpful  

    Flexible but not empathetic

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - English Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)
    Former Employee - English Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)

    I worked at Gaba Corporation as a contractor (more than a year)

    Pros

    Key thing here is that instructors that work there are not treated as "employees" which means you have full control of your schedule which allows for self study for course work and time off whenever.

    Cons

    Lower that market rate compensation, no employee benefits and strict "rating" system that reviews overall performance and extension of the contract.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Should give the perk to move to a full time instructor employee (NOT just ISL) for better retention of talent.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
  11. 2 people found this helpful  

    Good for part-timers, forget about a career here

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - One-to-one Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)
    Former Employee - One-to-one Instructor in Tokyo (Japan)

    I worked at Gaba Corporation as a contractor (more than a year)

    Pros

    Super flexible schedule good for students or people looking to work weekday evenings or weekends

    Cons

    Training is unpaid but mandatory. No real career advancement.. the recruiters say that you can eventually move up to management or head office, but this is a rarity! Even if you work full-time hours, no benefits, transportation allowance, nothing!

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Part-timers should receive part-time salaries and benefits. But full-time instructors deserve full-time salaries and benefits!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

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