Giesecke & Devrient

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Giesecke & Devrient Reviews

Updated Jul 2, 2014

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2.6 18 reviews

67% Approve of the CEO

Giesecke & Devrient CEO Dr. Walter Schlebusch

Dr. Walter Schlebusch

(3 ratings)

41% of employees recommend this company to a friend
18 Employee Reviews
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    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • Approves of CEO

     

    An international company that is not quite a multinational

    Director (Former Employee) Barcelona (Spain)

    ProsProfessional, good products, poorly researched with clients though which could improve products further

    ConsIf you are not German don´t expect to reach beyond a certain level in Management. You have to be prepared to toe the line: dissent is not liked...

    Advice to Senior ManagementListen to what your staff have to say as the input is frequently of value: your own management pay lip service but do not want to reflect the reality and any issues

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
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    • Disapproves of CEO

     

    Help urself by not joining this cmpny..DCI pune

    Software Engineer (Former Employee) Pune (India)

    ProsOnce u work here no problem seems to be bigger than this in ur life..

    ConsMiserable work conditions.Very poor pay.No career growth.Poor hikes.For freshers its strict NO...They exploit freshers and use their inexp to save money...they r of a opinion as if they saved ur life by offering u this job...its better to be unemployed then to start career here... extended their probation period for no reason....definitely ull face shock of ur life after seeing ur appraisal letter (i bet on this)...No matter how good ur u'll get same appraisal...becos they r decided even before ur joined :)...this one of the worst company u would ever dreamt of...Dont even waste ur time thinking about joining this cmpny....From my exp I say NO NO NO......

    Advice to Senior ManagementPls dont hire freshers....these struggling initial few years may have drastic impact on their life....im a victim

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
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    • Senior Management
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    • No Opinion of CEO

     

    Complete mistake.

    Anonymous Employee (Former Employee) London, England (UK)

    ProsIf you get on well with management you might vegetate for a while without having to do too much.

    ConsToxic atmosphere. Invalid IT operational systems. Lack of management. Politics instead of business. Lack of customer orientation.

    Advice to Senior ManagementStop dreaming about survival if you do not start a true modernization of this company.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

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    • Culture & Values
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    Off-track

    Anonymous Employee (Former Employee) Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden)

    ProsGreat opportunity to travel the world

    ConsPoor work-life balance, top managers with their own agenda.

    Advice to Senior ManagementGet a vision and stick to it.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
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    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • No Opinion of CEO

     

    There are Dinosaurs, and then there is this circus

    Business Analyst (Former Employee) Munich (Germany)

    Pros1) HQ jobs are generally well paid, apparently, compared to other Munich salaries, but different business groups get different benefits, and international subsidiaries are not as well reimbursed as the HQ compared to CoL.

    2) The workload is generally very light and the pace frustratingly slow, partly because top-down strategic alignment is so limp, and partly because the remits of peoples roles and accountabilities towards business proceses are barely defined, and partly because no one really has a 100% overview on group activities, programmes or workload. The opacity and confusion means you can pretty much avoid anything you dont want to do - there are people whos entire 28 year career have been based on exploiting these principles. This applies, unless you have a more dynamic line manager, in which case you'll both be constantly frustrated by the counterproductive efforts of other employees in less active divisions, who will resent being pushed by you for any deliverable. There is no such thing as willing collaboration, and managed coordination seems scarce, either at a micro level in your own team/businessline/group, or at a macro level between groups for projects/solutions, and any escalation will earn you the resentment of not only your own line management, but of those line managers who are responsibile for the teams you expect deliverables from.

    3) As a result of the light workload there is a great work-life balance here, particularly if you are one of the lucky individuals who has a line manager in another country. Working from home is permitted, and due to the generally low productivity in most departments, and the vacuum around accountability, visibility and consistency, that means its possible to settle into the pace of the organisation (first gear) and stay there for most of your career, without worrying about having to work weekends, work late, or really work much at all. This is a family run business, there are no shareholders, and every level of the business is basically pulling the wool over the eyes of the one above, until situations become too toxic to hide, whereupon the person holding the parcel when the music stops gets fired. When precise organisational reporting eventualy takes effect, a lot of people are going to be in for a shock.

    4) Peaceful working environment, resulting from the two previous points plus the fact that most customer interactions are dealt with at a senior level due to the numbers of project escalations, the levels of dissatisfaction and ennuie between associated internal/external partnerships, and the continuous rescheduling of even the lightest releases towards a completed solution. If you want, you are welcome to attend the various discussions, and in fact assigning yourself to multiple dialogues is to be encouraged, as the high volume of conference calls involved will ensure your available capacity/productivity is really kept to a minimum while making it appear that you're doing something useful.

    5) Freedom of creativity; by the virtue of the same issues that create a lack of top down coordination, strategc visibility and reporting structures, your line management will also find gathering holistic bottom-up information about their line reports activities a massive chore, and will inevitably reduce your group meetings to a kind of unstructured, vaguely work-related chinwag. If you are involved with resolving the latest fire that your line manager has directed everyones attention to, then you'll have to feedback on what you've done towards resolving it, inevitably, but if you've dodged any assignments or there is nothing nearby on fire, then you'll have free reign to make work for yourself, as it will also give your boss a bit of breathing space as well; they'll appreciate not having to manage you and just let you get on with whatever it is you're interested in.

    6) Corporate Stability. The company has been going for 160 years, primarily on the basis of Government printing contracts for passports, banknotes and IDs, but in the process has capitalised on the fact that all Banking and SIM customers have to have redundancy in their supply chain for credit cards and SIMs, and diverged its products to become the 2nd/3rd/4th choice supplier for provision of these commodities to Customers in their respective sectors. The pace of technological change has increased however, since the days of the block and ink and the introduction of credit and SIM cards, and the companies' subsequent attempts to keep up by developing Payment and Telecommunications-related technologies have been mainly based on badly-integrated acquisitions of smaller hi-tech suppliers, which have themselves been acquired and spat out again by other corporations multiple times before. Subsequently, the longstanding, cash-cow business groups end up funding chaotic, drawn-out and grossly expensive internal modernisation strategies, chaotic, half-committed and grossly expensive marketing strategies, and chaotic and half-supported globalisation strategies, so if you're part of one of those groups, or you're a consultancy advising the Management how to tie their shoelaces, you've got a job for life. If you're not, well, try and get a job in one of those groups, and dont count on being in the same job too long in the meantime.

    ConsSee #1: If you're not in an established group (Banknote, Banking, Gov), dont expect any perks apart from healthcare, (your bonus' will be pittance due to corporate underperformance) and if you're not working in the HQ, prepare to get generally exploited. And pensions? Forget it

    See #2: If you're a highly motivated individual, you'll probably be the only one on your floor who is. The majority of suits here are generally either beige career zombies or grey souless robots, and both types check their brains in at the door at 9:30am each day. After years of management vaccum, mastering the art of keeping their heads down, looking busy, and generally papershuffling, the robots deeply resent the likes of you knocking on their door, asking "why X is the way it is, and wouldn't it be better if you did Y" because you arent their boss and they only do things he tells them. They dont want to hear it, Sonny, get out. As for the zombies, dont even bother; you will be redirected around the organisation like an idiot looking for dehydrated water as one zombie brushes you off to another, whereupon you will either give up and become either a Robot or a Zombie, or go mad.

    See #3; If you unfortunate enough to have a local Manager and he is not one of the very few capable of achieving a long term objective, HE, and i use the masculine because the company is a full-on boysclub, will assign you a 80-20 mixture of busywork and tailchasing, then micro-manage the satisfaction out of everything you are assigned. Dont expect coordinated, strategic vision from any layer above you though, or well-considered, roadmapped goals, or anything in fact, other than running from one fire to another, collectively putting things out. If you are one of the few, the hallowed, blessed few who are under the management of someone who has more than 2 braincells (connected braincells i mean), STICK WITH THEM LIKE WHITE ON RICE. You have found an outstanding island in a sea of mediocrity, which you should only leave via a recruiters lifeboat.

    See #4; It can get a bit boring, at times, when you have completed the busywork tasks you have been assigned in the first 30 minutes of the day, so you will probably find yourself trying to solve things you think could be improved, applying intelligence to your own regular processes/interactions, trying to prevent the last thing that blew up from happening in the next project, setting up workgroups to assess specific issues and objectives and so on. STOP THIS RIGHT NOW! Call Stockholm, get the details for the Call of Duty Server, and tilt your screen away from anyone who might care what you're doing, and try to out-frag the R&D team. You will look sufficiently stressed at being regularly sniped and grenaded, to make both zombie and robot employees alike think you're doing something work-related, until you call it a day and hit Reddit when the server is turned off at 3pm. Alternatively, if you are in Sales, "take a client" out "for entertainment" to "the entertainment district" until you are completely "entertained" and "your clients" have been "suitably entertained" to the limits of your "daily expenses".

    See #5: Dont go nuts though; initiating achievable internal projects from a "worker" level, which involve actual investment and multiple teams' resources is strongly frowned upon, because everyone is already at 1900% capacity and R&D have clearly stated already that Call of Duty isnt just going to play itself, particuarly when so many Achievements remain unlocked. An effective accelerator programme, group creativity allowance or even a suggestion box have not been set up, specifically for this reason, so while you have a shred of autonomy left, you will be expected to work alone, begging, beating and/or bribing your colleagues for the favours that will enable your low priority, unofficial project to progress, until such time as it attains a "Bandwaggon" status, when the senior exec realise they actually need it urgently. At this point it will be escalated to the most important thing on planet Earth, and someone will try and take over the management of it and credit for it, and you will be expected to deliver, QA, integrate and launch everything related to your project, by the end of the month with the help of all the resources you need, except those will never actually manifest themselves. You will work, alone, on whatever you do, until you get fired, and then you will be kicked out, criticized for doing a bad job and finally fogotten, your legacy nothing more than a residual name in the Properties of an Exel file buried in the folder architecture of a derelict version of Sharepoint, on a CIT virtual machine. I've seen it happen a dozen times.

    See #6; The people in these groups are those who have 'made it'. They have graduated from the primordial soup of the subsidiaries, or the acquisitions, or whatever rock they crawled out from under, then developed legs and evolved into something suitable for the cash-cow business groups - a fully fledged Vorgon. And how you might ask? Well, by scrambling, clawing and stamping on everything and everyone in sight standing between them and their goal; zombies, robots and newbies alike, irrespective of whether they are their direct reports, their senior management or fellow colleagues. They have done this since they were born, like the Spartans, and only the toughest survive. You will not be given opportunities for personal growth, and you will not be promoted unless the shortfalls of the person above you are completely obvious and there is a particularly nasty situation they need you to own, and you will have to survive, unsupported and with no authority until you become one of them or get crushed. This is the culture, and these are the corporate values.

    Advice to Senior ManagementGet a grip, the corporate structure isnt the problem

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
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    • Career Opportunities
    • Approves of CEO

     

    Innovative and very established company, good for learning but not for earning.

    Senior Software Engineer (Current Employee) Pune (India)

    ProsCool colleagues across the world, smart stuffs to learn and work. importance of innovation. good annual leaves.

    Consslow growth, less salary. limited domain to work. bit of politics.

    Advice to Senior ManagementNA

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • Disapproves of CEO

     

    Management at G&D

    Anonymous Employee (Former Employee) Munich (Germany)

    ProsFamily owned business for 160 yrs, which makes the company independent. Job is secured- very good comfort zone.

    ConsToo conservative, no clear vision for the future, poor strategy. Lack of innovation may cost company's survival.

    Advice to Senior ManagementGet rid of this "Rolodex" Executive hiring system and bring on boards performing managers to save the company. Time is short.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
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    • Disapproves of CEO

    1 person found this helpful  

    I just started recently and it has not been a good experience.

    Manager, Financial Accounting & Reporting (Current Employee) Markham, ON (Canada)

    ProsNone so far, poor paid

    ConsLong hours, poor leadership and management

    Advice to Senior ManagementBetter leadership required.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • No Opinion of CEO

    1 person found this helpful  

    Money machine with zero care for employee needs

    Software Engineer (Former Employee)

    ProsMarket leader, solid job, intercultural, satisfactory office facilities, flexible working hours, ability to work from home

    ConsToo much bureaucracy, poor internal IT service, extremely rare company funded events/team building activities, poor (to non-existent) employee training, no company funded courses/trainings

    Advice to Senior ManagementListen to employees' needs and act upon them

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • Approves of CEO

    1 person found this helpful  

    Great when your boss supports you, great people if you walk to them... but many feel underpowered...

    Product Management (Current Employee)

    ProsGreat team members, tons of know how, quality products, possible to get professional trainings

    ConsIT lagging behind 'state of the art', slow internet, german minded (heavy process brings quality but slows completely innovation and ability to tackle new market activities)

    Advice to Senior ManagementGet divisions aligned faster for target markets. Leave a chance to technology scouting, there are some good marketing people ready to position early G&D. Invest earlier on people, support team members eager to grow.

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

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