Google Reviews

Updated October 22, 2014
Updated October 22, 2014
2,574 Reviews
4.4
2,574 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
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Google Co-Founder & CEO Larry Page
Larry Page
1,402 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Great work-life balance with adequate opportunity for career development (in 126 reviews)

  • Free food onsite three times a day is an essential convenience factor (in 249 reviews)


Cons
  • This is one reason why maintaining a good work-life balance can be challenging (in 113 reviews)

  • You can feel that it's a really big company now - difficult to advance & a lot of red tape (in 84 reviews)

More Highlights

Employee Reviews

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  1. 547 people found this helpful  

    Moving at the speed of light, burn out is inevitable

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Program Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Former Employee - Program Manager in Mountain View, CA

    I worked at Google full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    1) Food, food, food. 15+ cafes on main campus (MTV) alone. Mini-kitchens, snacks, drinks, free breakfast/lunch/dinner, all day, errr'day.

    2) Benefits/perks. Free 24:7 gym access (on MTV campus). Free (self service) laundry (washer/dryer) available. Bowling alley. Volley ball pit. Custom-built and exclusive employee use only outdoor sport park (MTV). Free health/fitness assessments. Dog-friendly. Etc. etc. etc.

    3) Compensation. In ~2010 or 2011, Google updated its compensation packages so that they were more competitive.

    4) For the size of the organization (30K+), it has remained relatively innovative, nimble, and fast-paced and open with communication but, that is definitely changing (for the worse).

    5) With so many departments, focus areas, and products, *in theory*, you should have plenty of opportunity to grow your career (horizontally or vertically). In practice, not true.

    6) You get to work with some of the brightest, most innovative and hard-working/diligent minds in the industry. There's a "con" to that, too (see below).

    Cons

    1) Work/life balance. What balance? All those perks and benefits are an illusion. They keep you at work and they help you to be more productive. I've never met anybody at Google who actually time off on weekends or on vacations. You may not hear management say, "You have to work on weekends/vacations" but, they set the culture by doing so - and it inevitably trickles down. I don't know if Google inadvertently hires the work-a-holics or if they create work-a-holics in us. Regardless, I have seen way too many of the following: marriages fall apart, colleagues choosing work and projects over family, colleagues getting physically sick and ill because of stress, colleagues crying while at work because of the stress, colleagues shooting out emails at midnight, 1am, 2am, 3am. It is absolutely ridiculous and something needs to change.

    2) Poor management. I think the issue is that, a majority of people love Google because they get to work on interesting technical problems - and these are the people that see little value in learning how to develop emotional intelligence. Perhaps they enjoy technical problems because people are too "difficult." People are promoted into management positions - not because they actually know how to lead/manage, but because they happen to be smart or because there is no other path to grow into. So there is a layer of intelligent individuals who are horrible managers and leaders. Yet, there is no value system to actually do anything about that because "emotional intelligence" or "adaptive leadership" are not taken seriously.

    3) Jerks. Sure, there are a lot of brilliant people - but, sadly, there are also a lot of jerks (and, many times, they are one and the same). Years ago, that wasn't the case. I don't know if the pool of candidates is getting smaller, or maybe all the folks with great personalities cashed out and left, or maybe people are getting burned out and it's wearing on their personality and patience. I've heard stories of managers straight-up cussing out their employees and intimidating/scaring their employees into compliance.

    4) It's a giant company now and, inevitably, it has become slower moving and is now layered with process and bureaucracy. So many political battles, empire building, territory grabbing. Google says, "Don't be evil." But, that practice doesn't seem to be put into place when it comes to internal practices. :(

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    1) Don't dismiss emotional intelligence and adaptive leadership. They're not just catch phases. You need great managers and leaders in order to build great companies and develop great employees. The people who may be brilliant at solving technical issues may not be (and are most often, not) the best candidates for management.

    2) Do something about that work-ife balance. Don't just have a bunch of pow-wows and tech talks and discussions about it. Leadership should actually model it. Consider re-evaluating how work is done; what processes are in place that are inefficient and ineffective and need to be updated or removed?

    3) Don't forget that there is already a pool of incredibly talented people within the company. If career development is really a goal at Google, then do it. Don't just hire from the outside. Take the time to help your employees develop their careers - then maybe you won't lose some of the great ones, and maybe you'll have prevent some of that burn out and disillusionment.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 60 people found this helpful  

    Great balance between big-company security and fun, fast-moving projects

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Software Engineer III in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Software Engineer III in New York, NY

    I have been working at Google full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    * If you're a software engineer, you're among the kings of the hill at Google. It's an engineer-driven company without a doubt (that *is* changing, but it's still very engineer-focused).
    * The perks are amazing. Yes, free breakfast, lunch, an dinner every weekday. Aaaaaamazing holiday parties (at Waldorf Astoria, NY Public Library, MoMA, etc.); overnight ski trips to Vermont; overnight nature trips to the Poconos in the summer; summer picnics at Chelsea piers; and on and on and on. I don't see this going away unless the company starts hurting financially.
    * Speaking of which, the company is doing quite well, which reflects in bonuses and equity grants.
    * There a huge diversity of work ranging from defending independent journalism worldwide (Google Project Shield) to crisis response during disasters (see Maps during Hurricane Sandy or Tsunamis), to the best machine learning experts and projects in the world, to more mundane revenue-driving projects in advertising, there's really something for everybody.
    * It's easy to move around within the company as long as you're in good standing (the vast majority of engineers are).
    * The company is amazingly open: every week Larry Page and Sergey Brin host what's called TGIF where food, beer, wine, etc. is served, a new project is presented, and afterward there's an open forum to ask the executives anything you want. It's truly fair game to ask anything, no matter how controversial, and frequently the executives will be responsive.
    * No, nobody cares if you use an iPhone, Facebook, shop with Amazon, stream using Spotify, or refuse to use Google+. The company is amazingly open and flexible.

    Neither pro nor con, but general information on work-life balance, promotions, and advancement.
    * Work life balance can be what you want it to be on most teams. (Some teams are in more competitive sectors and require more crazy hours all the time - but very few of them). If you do what's expected, you'll be fine at least for a handful of years. Working a roughly 40 hour work week is possible, and many people do it. There are also people who are hyper-motived and work like crazy just because they love it, or because they're competitive, or they want to get a promotion. If you work 40 hour weeks without putting in anything extra, you'll fall behind them as they advance and you stand still - and maybe that doesn't matter, so it works out for everybody. But at least know where you would realistically stand.
    * If you excel and work your butt off, you'll be compensated and promoted. If you let yourself be a code monkey, and just sit coding with your head down all day, you'll be fine but won't advance. A big complaint from some Googlers is about not being able to advance "even at Google" with pure coding. Sure, if you're the uber genius who created MapReduce and Bigtable, you're going to advance like a rocket without having to do anything but coding; but if you're like most engineers at Google -- smarter than average, but just average compared to other Googlers -- you're just a good coder and not revolutionary. Code monkeys are important to actually get stuff done, and to be sure you absolutely need to be a good coder as a software engineer (it's the minimum requirement), but code monkeys won't advance because they're not leaders and they're easy to replace. To get promoted you need to lead and do more than just code. There are plenty of ways to lead other than being an official tech lead, so this isn't actually _that_ hard, so the real point is just that you can't just sit there coding what other people tell you to code all day and expect to advance.

    Cons

    * It *is* becoming larger, and with it comes growing pains: bureaucracy, slow to respond to market threats, bloated teams, cross-divisional tension (though nothing remotely approaching that of Microsoft's internal tension).
    * The quality of the engineers is possibly dropping, but possibly not. It's hard to get real metrics, because as the absolute number of people grows, naturally the number of bad apples grows; as a percentage it's supposedly the same as it ever was, but with larger numbers of poorer quality engineers it just _feels_ like things might be changing for the worse.
    * Also with growth means more internal-confidential data leaks (again, because of the raw numbers of people) -- product announcements being ruined, etc. That means the company has to be tighter-lipped internally to avoid leaks, which makes things less open. It's still an amazingly open place, but less so than it was even a couple years ago. The good thing is they recognize it and actively look to improve things because they know how important it is to keep the good culture.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep the focus on the user. Everything else will follow.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  3. 5 people found this helpful  

    It's like being back in College again times going to Disneyland everyday

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in Mountain View, CA
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in Mountain View, CA

    I have been working at Google full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Free.Food.NOM.
    Beautiful campus, fun offices
    Free gyms & fitness classes
    Best 401k match I've ever seen
    Free transportation to work
    Generous maternity/paternity leave
    Brilliant, fun, friendly coworkers
    Larry & Sergey. Seriously, they are the best.
    Unlimited resources for personal development
    Interesting projects that are changing the world
    Bowling alleys, volleyball courts, massage chairs, laundry, etc
    Real work-life balance
    Hiring that focuses on outgoing, friendly people who are passionate about learning (as opposed to companies that only care what you know now, and if someone next to you knows .0001% more than you, you are out). Things change so quickly at Google you have to just have a good attitude and quickly learn/adapt.

    Cons

    As the company grows promotions are harder and internal politics increases. Interview process is very long (I had 14 interviews and it took months). But hands down it is still the best company to work for in the whole world, period.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop trying to concentrate all employees in MTV. There is no housing here and no one should have to put 80% of their take-home pay to rent.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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  5. 2 people found this helpful  

    Great Company, Great People, Unlimited Education

    Former Employee - Sales Associate in Mountain View, CA
    Former Employee - Sales Associate in Mountain View, CA

    I worked at Google as a contractor (less than an year)

    Pros

    I worked at Google as a contractor for about 8 months. I came in knowing next to nothing about sales and left knowing almost everything about cloud technology, SalesForce and of course Google products. Even when you are in a contractor role, they invest a lot of time and energy into making you successful. I learned more in those months than I have at any other position in the last 3-4 years. Could not recommend an experience more.

    Cons

    Kids managing kids (although they do it pretty well), separation between contractors and full time, inconsistent career paths

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep up the good work

    Approves of CEO
  6.  

    Best internship experience imaginable

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Cambridge, MA
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Cambridge, MA

    I worked at Google as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Google absolutely guarantees that your internship will be excellent. The pay is the same as a starting software engineer, you get access to all the perks, and you have the ability to do a simplified "intern conversion" process to become a full time engineer.

    Cons

    In my opinion, the biggest issue with Google is that there seem to be many people who are overqualified for their jobs. Mumble mumble "harvard grads answering orkut tickets" mumble mumble. Most of the time, however, people who are motivated to find interesting work are able to do so.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7.  

    Great experience overall.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Mountain View, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Mountain View, CA

    I have been working at Google full-time

    Pros

    Great coworkers and managers who really value you.

    Cons

    Huge company with a lot of bright people results in a lot of constant competition

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
  8.  

    Amazing Internship!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Engineering Practicum Intern in Cambridge, MA
    Former Employee - Engineering Practicum Intern in Cambridge, MA

    I worked at Google as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    - Great perks
    - Excellent food
    - Working on projects that touch millions of people
    - Working for Google the past summer has helped me alot this time around to get other internships.

    Cons

    I would often stay late and get caught up in my work. It was a personal choice though.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  9.  

    BA

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - BOLD Intern in Mountain View, CA
    Current Employee - BOLD Intern in Mountain View, CA

    I have been working at Google as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Great pay, location, people, perks, and culture

    Cons

    Not any cons, great place to work at

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep it going and continue hiring high caliber people

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  10.  

    Amazing company

    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Google

    Pros

    Perks, highly motivated, intelligent people.

    Cons

    Lots of people, can get lost

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    More empowerment to those who aren't engineers

  11.  

    Great culture, perks and talent but poor performance measurement and promotion process

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Associate Account Strategist in Ann Arbor, MI
    Former Employee - Associate Account Strategist in Ann Arbor, MI

    I worked at Google full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Talented and bright coworkers
    Great perks - free breakfast, lunch & snacks, quarterly offsites
    Unbeatable culture - no dress code, alcohol-friendly social events

    Cons

    Political in terms of promotion
    Metrics are used to track performance to a tee - at least 8 different metrics were added to performance assessment in the span of 6 months

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

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