IBM

  www.ibm.com
Work in HR? Unlock Free Profile

IBM Reviews in Austin, TX

Updated August 12, 2014
Updated August 12, 2014
11,963 Reviews

3.1
11,963 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
IBM CEO Virginia Rometty
Virginia Rometty
3,461 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Most managers are pretty flexible if you want to work from home a couple days a week (in 1228 reviews)

  • There are no unrealistic expectations causing work-life balance to be messed up (in 1189 reviews)


Cons
  • Though the company espouses work life balance there is no getting away from work (in 373 reviews)

  • Senior Management thinks that too many metrics are replacement for good management (in 202 reviews)

More Highlights

328 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1.  

    Overall a good company, but a great deal of bureaucracy.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Strategic Sales Leader  in  Austin, TX
    Current Employee - Strategic Sales Leader in Austin, TX

    Pros

    Excellent reputation, customer satisfaction, and resources. Numerous opportunities for advancement and career changes into various positions. Ability to grow and advance within the organization.

    Cons

    Red tape and numerous layers of management, but trying to eliminate obstacles. Often times an environment of insecurity due to potential layoffs.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    A very good company

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Associate Partner  in  Austin, TX
    Former Employee - Associate Partner in Austin, TX

    Pros

    Good brand recognition, thought-leadership, and culture. IBM experience would help one's career.

    Cons

    Low efficiency, business growth is slow which resulted in less career advancement opportunities.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Improve career development and compensation

    No opinion of CEO
  3.  

    Software Engineer

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Software Engineer  in  Austin, TX
    Former Employee - Software Engineer in Austin, TX

    Pros

    Most technical employees are good and know what they are doing

    Cons

    Old boys' network: promoting wrong people. Incompetent middle management. Too much over-time. No work-life balance.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Treat your employees with respect.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  4. We want your feedback – Are these company reviews helpful to you?  Yes | No
  5.  

    Many talented people, frequently stretched thin as the company aims to execute on new strategies and existing business.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Austin, TX
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX

    Pros

    There are many people with very good technical skills in the company, and a strong work ethic. Having been with the company for a long time, in my opinion there is no longer "dead weight" in contrast to 20 years ago when there were still employees with mentality that IBM was a place of lifetime employment regardless of contribution level.

    The career opportunities are especially good for new entrants into the company (college hires).

    Cons

    The company is trying to execute on new strategies which is both exciting and stressful - the legacy businesses are still critical to maintain which stretches resources thin.

    There are a lot of experienced and hardworking employees with limited opportunities.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  6.  

    My experience at IBM has been rewarding

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Architect  in  Austin, TX
    Current Employee - Senior Architect in Austin, TX

    Pros

    Challenging roles, ability to work from home and flexible working schedule

    Cons

    Too much work, no money for training, travel or laptop upgrades, conflicting leadership

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Trust your leaders, invest in your people

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7. 1 person found this helpful  

    Great Company

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Staff Hardware Engineer  in  Austin, TX
    Current Employee - Staff Hardware Engineer in Austin, TX

    Pros

    IBM is a great company. Working with smart people. The flexibility to work from home is a big advantage over other companies. IBM knows how to succeed in the tech market.

    Cons

    Working in the Hardware group has been difficult. Low morale. Unimpressive bonuses and raises. They have let go of experienced hard working engineers for the sake of saving money.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Show more appreciation for current employees.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  8.  

    Overseas Outsourcing All Areas of Business

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Austin  in  Austin, TX
    Former Employee - Austin in Austin, TX

    Pros

    No Pros that I am able to provide

    Cons

    Never worked for a company that cared less about their employees

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9.  

    Are you a designer being recruited for the IBM Design studio in Austin? Turn the interview down.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - User Experience Design  in  Austin, TX
    Former Employee - User Experience Design in Austin, TX

    Pros

    Design salaries are competitive (but at a cost).
    – Design studio mentors do seem to care (but you get a sense they are unhappy too).

    Cons

    The studio directors talked a big talk about changing the world through design and fighting the good fight for user experience. In the interview, you're told (somewhat arrogantly, in hindsight) that you're here to "save IBM" by changing it into a design-led culture. Don't be fooled. In the end, what they are selling you is the same old IBM in "design studio" drag. Everything here is a facade.

    Here's what you can expect: an extensive interview in which you are wined, dined, and shown how awesome the studio space is (it's just okay) and how fun Austin is. Once hired, you'll spend a few months being romanced in "design thinking" camps with blue-sky exercises and nurturing from some studio mentors (the only people there who seem to care). Then the studio turns you loose onto a product in the "real IBM," and most of the people that fawned over you suddenly seem to forget about you—unless you raise concerns about your project or offer constructive criticism, at which point you seem to be immediately labeled as "entitled" or as a "complainer" who needs to just "do the job in front of them." Before long, you'll feel like a head of cattle instead of a designer.

    In the design camp, you work on "save the world" product ideas, and it's promised you'll have lots of choices of what to work on when you are finally "deployed." In reality, you are never told about the decisions made about you, your assignments are picked for you, and your project will be defined by money, salespeople and panicky middle managers... but not actual user needs. It is difficult to feel effective.

    After a short time it becomes clear you've landed in a culture of fear and blame. The people running the studio at the very top levels do not make an effort to empathize with you—though you will have enough interaction with them to hear how tired they are from traveling, how put-upon they feel they are with such an important job, and how inept they believe the rest of IBM is. Studio communication is poor and contradictory, and if you dare to point that out, then the director will become combative and you (like many others before you) will be blamed for not "making it better yourself." Outside the studio, in "regular IBM," you find that the lower band-level folks who do the work are rarely given credit by their managers, and you are at significant risk of finding out that you all work for one of many shallow, sheltered, self-aggrandizing executives in the company. With regard to the work, it doesn't matter if your project's progress is healthy or suffering, as long as the studio directors can show people a set of pretty pictures as "proof" that IBM Design is succeeding. It doesn't take long to realize that everyone here is really just out for themselves.

    As time goes on, there is so little discussion of what is happening outside IBM that you yourself are in danger of becoming sheltered from what's happening in design in the real world.

    The systems you'll use (Intranet, online tools, storage) are antiquated, unreliable, and counterproductive.

    The performance reviews are a "stacked rating" system, and are only based on quotas and financials instead of how well you did your job.

    Most designers will not qualify for bonuses in any given year.

    You won't have anything to show in your portfolio from the entire time you are there because everything is under a non-disclosure agreement.

    The morale of designers here is rock-bottom. If you relocate to IBM in Austin, you may experience such a shocking transition from the job that was promised to the job in reality that, like many before you, it won't be long before you want to move back.

    IBM Design recruiters are being paid to misrepresent the job. Don't believe them. It's a good market right now, especially for those of us who are early in their design careers. Go work literally anywhere else.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Eliminate layers of middle management from the decision hierarchy.
    – Replace the demotivating stacked performance review system.
    – Treat with validity, and not incredulity, the observations of your "boots on the ground" people.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  10.  

    Sliding into mediocrity

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - IT Architect  in  Austin, TX
    Former Employee - IT Architect in Austin, TX

    Pros

    Global reach, lots of things to work on. Chance to grow if you want to overwork yourself.

    Cons

    Too much focus on cost cutting. Not enough focus on customers or employees. Didn't see a raise for years, even with exceeds expectations reviews.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Employees are people, treat them as such. Anyone will do the job, you need to give them something to get behind, to support.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  11.  

    No value on employees.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Austin, TX
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX

    Pros

    There is a global work force and you get to meet people from other countries. Working from home is possible. Lots of custom tools and local support. You get to share an office with another employee in your team. You are not micro-managed and you might meet with your manager once a month.

    Cons

    No real support for Hardware development from the CEO. Open source of the Power Architecture to anyone shows that IBM is looking for someone else to build the hardware and IBM can just be a software company.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    you need to listen to your technical advisers on what will be the leading trend in the future. You totally missed out on the open source Linux.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

Worked for IBM? Contribute to the Community!

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.