Joyce Meyer Ministries Reviews

Updated July 28, 2015
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Joyce Meyer Ministries CEO, US Operations Daniel Meyer
Daniel Meyer
10 Ratings

25 Employee Reviews

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  1. Helpful (2)

    I really enjoy working for a ministry with a mission to help others and spread the word of God.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Fenton, MO
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Fenton, MO

    I have been working at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time (More than a year)

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Competitive pay and benefits, casual Christian Ministry work environment, employee meetings are replaced with prayer time, chapels and core value studies, employees working together toward the mission to help hurting people in the world and spread the gospel.

    Cons

    Opportunities for career advancement are limited but opportunities for spiritual growth are more prevalent. If you are looking for a high risk, technical savvy place to work, this is not it.

    Advice to Management

    Increase personal, sick and vacation time.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Apr 8, 2015 – HR Manager

    Your opinion matters, thanks for taking the time to share it. The ministry is certainly growing in many ways and the mission to Share Christ-Love People is at the center of what we do. Calculated ... More


  2. What exit interviews are...

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    They gave me the tools to get a better job!

    Cons

    I just wanted it know that an "exit interview" consisted of being taken to top floor, sat down with a woman I've never met nor knew my department, and being asked if I had siblings and my favorite part of working there. Oh and she offered to pray for me? That's it. Lots of distrust between management and employees.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Jul 31, 2015 – HR Manager

    We are glad that you found a place to be successful and grow. Joyce Meyer Ministries takes the time to invest in and equip employees and its great to hear that you could use that information in your ... More


  3. Helpful (13)

    Irregularities that are actually regular

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Systems Administrator in Fenton, MO
    Former Employee - Systems Administrator in Fenton, MO

    I worked at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    The Pros include Excellent People, Excellent Facility, Top Flight Security. I can't express how excellent the people of JMM are. When I say this I am speaking of the working class, since there is a severe case of classicism which I will cover later. The facilities are also top-notch. The meticulous care to the outside grounds and the care taken to keep the interior clean, bright and modern is excellent. The security is also one of the world's best. No where have I ever felt more safe and more monitored. I know that there will be no funny business going on as everyone is watched more than the NSA watches the American public.

    Cons

    So the Cons. There is a severe form of classicism that goes on here that made it extremely difficult to work. In most places it has always been pushed as best tool for the job, best people for the job. This is not the case here. Employee classicism is strong here. There isn't a form of team across the board. When it comes to equipment management gets the best equipment and the ability to have a flexible work schedule. The working class does not get this. Getting hardware that makes it easy to do the job is held back because it wouldn't look right. Now it might sound petty, and you are right it is. But it means a lot when the people doing the work get what they need. If it is a cost reason for this not occurring that's one thing. But that is not the case here. Management, while many of the managers are very good at JMM. There are a few that make it extremely difficult to work. As alluded to in other reviews the PMO department was difficult. In many meetings things would feel combative. Even when ideas are being presented to do things differently it always felt like a fight. Over time this caused a lot of poor decisions to be made as people didn't have the energy to support their idea anymore. Trust: the lack of trust in employees to make appropriate decisions is another major con. The lack of trust or confidence in employee decision making makes it extremely frustrating to work here. There have been many nights where I went home wondering why I even bother. Been tasked with many highly visible projects and at the end of the day was forced to go with a way that would not be successful. When the project failed or stalled, I would then be the recipient of the blame. So i guess in a sense the employees are trusted to receive the blame for failure. Absentee CEO: This one is really odd. The CEO of the ministry is highly invisible which doesn't seem to fit for an organization of this size. It gives a feel of not caring. This might be reality as with the amount of turn-over and failed projects, there aren't a lot of macro changes nor is there a lot of communication received down stream from the CEO, Benefits: While many speak highly of the healthcare benefits, the rest are really rotten. There is no consistency with how simple things like PTO are to be managed. Many departments require that all salaried individuals take PTO for any Doctor's appointments. This is especially odd when there is mandatory overtime put in effect sometimes to complete projects. There is rarely grace given for employees when it does not work out in the ministry's favor. So yes, while you may have healthcare benefits, in a lot times you can't use it since you might not have the PTO for it or you are on a project which since it was poorly managed no longer has the time for you to take care of yourself. I'll also mention HR in that while the people are great, they are handcuffed to make changes it appears. All the posts I've seen here reviewing JMM are not exaggerations as I've witnessed the behaviors first hand.

    Advice to Management

    Trust your employees, remove the culture of classicism.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Jul 9, 2015 – Senior Recruiter

    At Joyce Meyer Ministries we believe in supporting employees to do their job with excellence and supporting them in their personal growth. Our Exit Interviews consistently reflect that most ... More


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  5. Helpful (10)

    This will most likely be ignored.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    There are a lot of great things about working at JMM. The people are exceptional, the mission is on point and the environment is certainly one of a kind. The benefits are nice, but with the rumors floating around that employees will have to pay for healthcare out of pocket, management should expect a mass exodus. There are a lot of great people that work at JMM including middle management in the IT department. Although IT takes a lot of flak on this site, I can say that the current middle management team is not to blame. I'd also like to say that the CSO and Director of Operations are both really stand up individuals.

    Cons

    While there are a ton of PROS, the CONS are plentiful as well. VERY low pay, especially when compared to the Saint Louis region. The ministry labels themselves as a Media Ministry until it comes to pay, in which case they label themselves as a Humanitarian ministry. Sorry guys, you are NOT Salvation Army or Goodwill. You cannot pay good employees as though you are, and expect to keep exceptional talent. Even bigger than that, I witnessed sexual harassment within this building, reported it, and nothing was done to the individual. Perception around the office is that everything was swept under the rug by the puppets known as HR. You shouldn't have someone like this as an employee, let alone in front of Joyce Meyer constituents on a daily, monthly, annual basis. There have been MANY complaints about this individual, but it seems HR does not care to handle the situation. What used to be a ZERO tolerance policy has since changed to a MANAGERS DISCRETION. Sorry, but sexual harassment should not be up to the discretion of ANYONE. It should be an immediate termination. If you ever have to deal with Project Management, prepare for one of the most arrogant, rude, micromanagers that you could ever imagine. If she doesn't get her way, everyone under her will be living a "Hell on Earth". The management over PM has no trust in any of the project managers. If you don't trust them, fire them; but if you DO trust them, allow them to do their job without interfering on a daily basis. Whenever a large project comes up, management will take the lead on it. If that project begins to fail, it will passed off at the last minute and FULL blame is placed on the project managers. However, if the PMs do something well, management will take full credit for that. C-Level management sees these issues, and rather than fixing the problem (i.e. FIRING THE ISSUE), they continue to coddle it. I always got along with the my C-Level Manager on a personal level. I have a ton of respect for him personally. But professionally, it was very hard to respect him. He made MANY promises over my time there, and never followed through. I was told, "You have management potential, and I would like to mentor you, but you are still too new here for the management opening," and then he went on to hire external candidates for management positions. If you want to be a manager in IT, you should make sure to apply to it externally. Do NOT expect to be hired from within. Another issue with the the leadership in IT was the lack of decision making. People often blamed IT issues on a former leader in the IT department, but when she was the a part of IT, she actually made decisions. Whether people agreed with those decisions all of the time or not, at least a decision was made. At least we could move forward. Ever since she was promoted, IT has been STALE. It has fallen to depths that previous employees probably wouldn't dream possible. IT middle management are rockstars, but the problem is they care about their employees too much. They actually want to see their employees succeed, which is a problem because the their leadership seems to have a different agenda. Because the SD and TI manager put their necks on the line for employees, they are constantly blamed for things they have no control of. When I started at JMM in 2013, there were 40 people in the IT department. When I left in 2015, there were 20, yet middle management was expected to churn out the same, if not more, amount of work, and if they didn't, they were chewed out. When Joyce decides that she is ready to retire and spend time with her husband (HIGHLY deserved, she is a fantastic speaker, preacher and woman), this ministry will FOLD. Hand of Hope will continue to do great work because the CEO of HOH CARES.

    Advice to Management

    Cut the crap. Stop sweeping the trash under the rug. Get rid of the people who HURT the name. Get rid of the man who has constant complaints of sexual harassment, even if that means that the ministry takes a hit. Think of the employees who have been in a really horrible situations because of HIS actions. Allow the HR team to do their job.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Jul 2, 2015 – HR Manager

    Thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts and perspective. Contrary to the title, however, we don’t ignore anyone’s input. We highly value and appreciate insightful, solution based ideas ... More


  6. Helpful (8)

    Amazing place to work, terrible place to work.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    My colleagues. Period. Hands down, some of the most talented, friendly, and FUN people I've EVER worked with. I still have lasting friendships with a large number of them. Most, if not all, have gone on to greener pastures and are doing quite well. The actual location in Fenton is second to none. Some might say it's too nice and could be considered a temple built to honor the MILLIONS the ministry brings in each year, but it was certainly a nice place to work nonetheless. The pay seemed lower than expected industry wide in the area of St. Louis, but, when you look at the total compensation package, it was on par with the rest of the area. For the most part, we got what we needed technology wise and rarely, if ever, went without a tool or license we needed. The type of work we did was awesome from a challenge and creative perspective. The way the projects were ran and ultimately ended... see the Cons section about that. If the "Advice to Management" comments from this and the other reviews were to be heeded, I'd recommend this place in a heartbeat. Until then, AVOID LIKE THE PLAGUE.

    Cons

    Where do I start? From the week I started I knew some people were going to be trouble to work with. I assumed it was just an abrasive personality or maybe a bad week. When I still felt that way a year in, I knew something systemic was wrong. My direct manager was treated like an unwanted step child. Until he was ultimately removed from duty, he was constantly berated and undermined. Once a new manager was promoted from within, things went from bad to terrible at light speed. The terminations started shortly thereafter for what I'd consider ridiculous or even in some cases, illegal reasons. Unfortunately, the details aren't going to get typed here for fear of retribution. If they weren't just firing you, they were colluding behind your back to get you to quit by talking down to you, purposely twisting conversations and facts, or plotting scenarios to trap people in as well as straight up lying about facts. They would create issues that didn't exist like walking with a coworker meant you were talking about management negatively. Or going to lunch with the wrong people only to come back and be literally yelled at behind closed doors. Constantly being bullied with passive aggressive threats and having "Matthew 18" rammed down your throat all the while letting middle to upper management absolutely off any hooks under the guise of "business operations". After you figured out how to navigate those treacherous waters, you started to realize your reputation was being created/damaged without your involvement. People (who were always unnamed) would "say things". You never heard what they said or who said it (even though that was literally against their Matt 8:19 rule). When you were on a project you were typically dictated to as to the technology, requirements, etc. but it was always communicated in a vague and generic way. At first you thought maybe they were giving you some latitude to be creative. WRONG! They did it so they always had an escape route and of course, some underling to smoke with a bus. Senior management in IT would conduct witch hunt after witch hunt. The management in project management was just as bad if not worse. How can you possibly keep your job as a manager/director when you literally have people QUIT THEIR FIRST DAY!? Sure, a few bad hires here and there, but the sheer volume of turnover was indicative that the management was either incompetent at hiring or managing. Either way, that's grounds for removal. Management would routinely run a project into the ground, blame the PM on the project then take it over themselves. Once the project started going poorly again, they’d blame team leads. For example, the project to rebuild the ministry’s public website had at least 3 team leads in one year. They were either demoted or fired. We saw a lot of really seasoned, technically expert employees come and go battered and bruised. To this day, I maintain contact with numerous ex-JMM employees and we all tell war stories about this and that. Ultimately, we’re all better for having left. I wish the problems stopped in the IT department but, sadly, no, they don’t. The Media division is headed by management that spends a lot of their time travelling and on TV. That in and of itself isn’t bad, but who runs the place while they're gone? That’d be the marketing department. They'd spend way too much time arguing with designers and developers over ridiculous things like how many pixels away a button should be, or the exact color of some text. At the end of the day, good management will provide a clear vision and get out of the way and let the people they hire do the job their experts at. When you would get management to finally discuss even the simplest designs, it’d take weeks if not months to decide and be redesigned over and over. I'm certain the significant time off, ski trips, and "work travel" were huge contributing factors there. All the while, the clock is ticking down on the deadline because, “it’s already in print and on the TV show”. If I had a dollar for every time I heard that…. There were numerous project we ended up working 2-3 days non-stop to deploy. This happened about once every 2-3 months. Working from 8a-10p was regular for some weeks. Oh, and since we were salaried… no pay. Comp time??? PTO??? Rarely happened unless my direct manager just did it himself. We worked tirelessly to build the new website and get it deployed even though all the technology staff advised numerous times that it was a sinking ship and it’d be better to cut the losses and rebuild it correctly. Those conversations took place well over 5 years ago and still… to this day, after spending MILLIONS of donation dollars, the site has yet to be finished. Even after some of us worked 100h weeks for months on end to deploy the broken new site, we got a few days of PTO and a 5% bonus (taxed at 40%). I can tell you first hand, being negative about ANYTHING (including recommending against a design or technology) is essentially hanging yourself. Even if you’re right about the suggestion and they don’t agree… it’s your fault and surely you will take the fall. At some point, the board of directors and/or donors need to step up and see just how much money gets wasted on poor management like this. From millions of dollars for a busted CRM to more millions on a busted website to millions on employee turnover… at some point, they’ll have to realize the issues and correct them. Maybe if they created a department that oversaw resources… you know the human resources that work there rather than just the department that hires and fires people JMM would ACTUALLY be one of the “Best places to work in St. Louis”.

    Advice to Management

    Joyce, You have a heart for hurting people. It's just as important to look inside your own house as it is to clothe, treat, and feed the children in Africa. Time to clean the wolves in sheep's skins in management. These are the people controlling YOUR vision, YOUR ministry. Proverbs 27:23 "Know well the condition of your flocks, and give attention to your herds," Hebrews 13:17 "Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with groaning, for that would be of no advantage to you." The leaders you have placed in authority over your flock don’t live up to those verses. Do the right thing and at least check out these numerous claims.


  7. Helpful (8)

    Great organization, dishonest IT management

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Systems Administrator in Fenton, MO
    Former Employee - Systems Administrator in Fenton, MO

    I worked at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    The mission at JMM was a driving force through difficult projects. It helped me stay centered and appreciate my work. I loved my coworkers regardless of their department. The facilities and grounds were also top-notch. Both pay and benefits were competitive for the area.

    Cons

    C-level IT and project management routinely broke trust and mislead us. Management frequently re-worked the bare-minimum project proposals into unsupportable messes. The admins were then blamed for the unworkable solutions and punished with on-call rotations from hell. I also observed dishonorable negotiations between management and multiple vendors (misleading, sharing quoted pricing, etc) HR seemed to be powerless to resolve the employee abuse and manipulation, unable to stop the multi-year IT witch hunt that saw IT staff quit or fired, turning over 2 or 3 times in 5 years. We had an amazingly talented team that has been destroyed through scheming. Several of us were transferred to other departments to launch a new website, under the guise of producing a better product by directly with the creatives. IT management let it be known that it was part of a plan to let the creative departments fail so IT could save the day and take back control. At the end of the day, everything seemed like a power-struggle.

    Advice to Management

    Replace IT and project management leadership with effective leadership that will be honest with both JMM leadership and their employees.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Jul 9, 2015 – HR Manager

    Your feedback is appreciated. Please know that it is taken seriously and your comments have been forwarded to the Executive Level for review. Joyce Meyer Ministries is dedicated to it's vision of ... More


  8. Helpful (2)

    Run Away... Run FAR Away

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    Pros

    The People -- I worked with a lot of really great people, and developed life-long friendships. These people are all non-management employees. The Healthcare -- 100% coverage for me, (They do not cover spouses who work -- even though they tried to claim otherwise in the benefits review), and my children. The Security -- As a previous reviewer mentioned, the security team is to die for. SD Manager -- This guy is fantastic. He cares. Unfortunately, I believe that will be his downfall. He cares too much. I've not met the new manager, but I've heard really solid things about him too. Great middle management in IT.

    Cons

    The CEO -- In my entire time at JMM, I believe that I actually saw the CEO a whopping total of 1 time. He didn't introduce himself by any means, because he doesn't have time to meet the peasants that allow him to ski 9 months out of the year. All decision making had to come from the CEO, so nothing ever got accomplished here because he was never around. The CIO -- Everyone is terrified of this man. I do not get it. Worst decision maker that I have ever worked for. (I would have liked to say "work with", but you can't work with this guy. You are ALWAYS wrong.) He is a liar, he is a manipulator, and God forbid you turn your back for even a moment... He will stab you in the back faster than you can say Matthew 18. This is a man that would not cut it as a Mid-Level Manager in any other company. Especially in St. Louis, people know who he is. Recruiters have actually called me and said, “We can get you out from under the thumb of [Name]”. Everyone knows who he is, and everyone knows what he is. Do not even attempt to correct him on anything. Do not attempt to present an idea that goes against his. Do not attempt to cross him. You will be eaten alive. Project Management– The only way to get anything through the dictatorship over this team is to use the back door. Nothing gets done correctly, everything is rushed, and if it’s not done right, it’s your fault. The worst part is that everyone knows it. People outside of IT have claimed that project management treats everyone like children. We are always talked down to in meetings. We are always made to look like the bad guy in front of customers. MULTIPLE people have quit within a week of working with this group. The turnover in IT/PMO is at least 10 times the amount of any other department at the ministry. That in and of itself should be a warning. HR -- As other reviewers have mentioned, HR is full of great people, but they are really just a smokescreen for the COO. It's unfortunate because the COO is scared of the CIO. Joyce Meyer has written something like 70+ books... She could write at least double that with the complaints that have been submitted to HR and ignored. The COO will not act on the complaints, because he has no spine. The most unfortunate part is that people really do like everyone in HR. The employees are all top notch people. They will lie to you, and they will manipulate situations, but that is definitely coming from above. I do not believe that the HR employees purposefully manipulate people. The Website – If donors only knew how many millions of dollars have been spent trying to build a new website they would immediately stop donating. JMM always preaches about how they are open with their finances, and they release the annual financial report every year, but that report does not tell the whole story. Not even close. The CEO either doesn’t know, or doesn’t care, how horrible this project has been. It’s taken over 5 years of development, multiple project managers, multiple team leads, multiple Web Management changes, multiple vendor changes, and it is still not complete. The only consistency on this project has been the CIO who makes bad decisions and the Project Management Office which dictates everything. Maybe it’s time to move on from these people and you can finally have the website that integrates with Facebook. One more HR con -- Sweeping things under the rug. I have read every single review on this site. Every single one. The responses "The Executive Team will review this" or "Looks like you had an abnormal experience" are absurd. If you got every single member of IT (and most employees outside of IT who have to deal with PMO or IT) in a one on one situation with the COO or CEO, each one will tell you the same story. This is not just a couple of disgruntled employees looking to bash the ministry. I love what Joyce Meyer MInistries stands for. I love the work that Joyce does. I love the people that I worked with. I am not just a disgruntled employee. I want to see the ministry succeed. The only way to do that is to fire the problem. There will be no success until those situations are cleared up.

    Advice to Management

    DO THE RIGHT THING. Clean up shop. Remove the problems. Give HR the ability to make changes where they see fit. Force the CEO, who takes a hefty salary, to show up to work. Don't allow him to sit on the slopes 9 months out of the year. Show Dave and Joyce that you care about what they started. Also, quit acting so delusional? Quit trying to make people believe that the management that has folder complaints against them are really great people who are trying to help the ministry succeed. These people, as many have stated previously, are wolves in sheeps clothing. "We believe this is exemplified by every employee at every level..." Do you really believe that everyone posting here is just a bunch of disgruntled employees trying to bring the ministry down? The only people bringing down the ministry are those who allow the sexual harassment, the classicism, the sexism, the cronyism and the nepotism to continue.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Jul 22, 2015 – HR Manager

    We appreciate your passion. The nature of your comments show that you have a clear concern about Joyce Meyer Ministries. As you should remember, Dave and Joyce Meyer founded this ministry on ... More


  9. Helpful (3)

    Good People work herr

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Call Center Representative in Fenton, MO
    Current Employee - Call Center Representative in Fenton, MO

    I have been working at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time (More than 8 years)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    100% healthcare, secured property, great coworkers, supportive staff, spiritual atmosphere

    Cons

    Very limited growth potential, communication breakdown, not as family oriented, focus is more on the world needs than its employees needs at times though may not be intended.

    Advice to Management

    To improve retention, grow and promote your current employees. Take time to learn about your employees and show them that you truly care about their talent, growth professionally, and their needs personally. By doing this, you will reach even more people for Christ.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Jul 2, 2015 – HR Manager

    Thanks! Those are all really great points. We work hard to provide opportunities to grow and enrich the jobs of ministry employees. Thanks for your heart and if you would like to discuss your ... More


  10. Helpful (4)

    Christian organization or religious organization?

    Former Employee - Anonymous
    Former Employee - Anonymous

    I worked at Joyce Meyer Ministries

    Pros

    Nice coworkers, beautiful building, knowing that your job positively impacts those who are in need.

    Cons

    Difficult to advance your career. Management plays games. Use bogus write ups to force resignations or reasons to terminate. Trust seemed low.

    Advice to Management

    Get to really know your employees so that their strengths can grow and be used to advance the ministry. Don't pigeon hole people. Stop blurring the lines between being "religious" and being real.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Nov 25, 2014 – HR Manager

    We very much appreciate your honest and open feedback. We encourage an open culture that inspires trust in every employee. Integrity and Unity are some of our Core Values and when they are lived ... More


  11. Helpful (11)

    Good people, poor leadership.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Joyce Meyer Ministries full-time (More than 3 years)

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    If you have a desire to work in Christian ministry, it is unlikely to find a better working environment that also gives you free weekends, and functions as a typical corporate 9-5 job. The pay is decent, the insurance benefits are excellent as they pay 100% family coverage. My experience had a good work-life balance. The facilities are immaculately maintained, and various departments have their own ability to creatively apply features that make them unique. There are some really good people who work there, talented, caring, kind and normal. They do a lot of good around the world especially with their humanitarian outreach. The ministry owns everything they have because they don't believe in debt. So it is a very liquid organization. They own the multi-million dollar private jet, they own the building and everything in it, nothing is financed. So they have a very sold business model in that sense. The fact they stayed so liquid seemed to help them stay afloat during the recession. Joyce can be extremely generous and thoughtful. Even given all of the negative elements there is at least a sense that you are part of doing something good in the world rather than simply working at a company selling a product that is only about profits. As long as you know what you are getting into and have resolved the issues in your heart that by working here you are selling and promoting Joyce Meyer, then I would recommend working at JMM, because every company has its issues, no company is perfect.

    Cons

    JMM could be a much better place to work if they valued their people in a much greater way. They do not value family time nor family integration as many forward thinking companies do. They don't compensate well for additional over time. Example if you work an additional 40 hours during a busy season you will probably only receive one extra day of comp-time. Although you are expected to work additional hours, you should not expect to be compensated for that. So you spend time away from your friends, family and personal life, yet you are not reciprocated. There are a lot of companies who do the same thing, but it seems even more out of place at a Christian ministry where family would normally be placed in high regard. The CEO is seldom seen, except when staff members pass around photos from Facebook of him snowboarding at the family place in Colorado. The other brother is CEO of World Outreach and he actually DOES show up to work regularly. However his personality is tyrannical given the number of times that I would be in the bathroom and someone from his department would come in crying after having been scolded by him. JMM is built on nepotism and cronyism. You need to know who everyone is and how they are related to the family so that you don't accidentally offend the wrong person. You may need to also carefully learn who the cronies are. They are the people who will swiftly throw you under the bus to keep their status or prevent themselves getting in trouble. The system for giving raises when I was there was predictable. You meet with your manager and they go over a list of things that add up to a certain number of points. These points determine what raise you qualify for. In all cases the deck is stacked against you because essentially they are looking for reasons to grade you low, so that they don't have to give you as much of a raise if any at all. You can do 100 things right, but if based on their opinion you did one thing wrong, it counts against you. The wrong thing is what is remembered on your review. The 100 things right that you did was simply you performing at the expected level. In other words if you do everything RIGHT you will be marked as performing as expected. Even if you went above and beyond what actually would be required to accomplish those things, it is not counted as performing above expectations. So it has generated a culture that applauds the status-quo. Or an idea that you should work just hard enough not to get fired. Don't stick your neck out, don't try anything new, just stay steady and build those proverbial Joyce widgets. There are many talented wonderful people stuck here because of the great insurance benefits but if they had a way out many of their best employees would be gone. It doesn't have to be that way. A cultural shift in the way they treat employees could make JMM a fantastic place to work. But their previous attempts to show appreciation have been token gestures that come across as disingenuous.

    Advice to Management

    Show appreciation in dramatic, tangible ways. There is so much talk about doing things for the world and helping people outside of the ministry, yet you have several hundred people working with you everyday who are hurting, and need help. I doubt that management could do much at this point, but essentially you need to TRUST people more. You need to care about people more. You need to offer more opportunities for people to feel rewarded, appreciated and fulfilled. Treat employees as if the COMPANY is getting the better end of the deal. Treat them as if JMM is privileged that those employees are working there, instead of treating them like the paycheck is thanks enough.

    Joyce Meyer Ministries Response

    Aug 27, 2014 – HR Manager

    Thanks for your comments, we appreciate your feedback. At Joyce Meyer Ministries we value people and believe that the ministry is made stronger by its exceptional team members. Our culture is ... More



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