MaPS Reviews

Updated August 14, 2014
Updated August 14, 2014
17 Reviews
2.3
17 Reviews
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MaPS President Dirk Wells
Dirk Wells
8 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    Good for a first job in market research

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Research Analyst in Waltham, MA
    Former Employee - Research Analyst in Waltham, MA

    I worked at MaPS full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    The people in your cohort are great--usually very smart. There's a definitive "work hard, play hard" attitude, making it great for young people. It's a really great first job because you learn the fundamentals of survey research, including survey methodology and data analysis. Another pro is that if you want to stay with the company (if the first year doesn't burn you out), then there are very clear paths to promotions.

    Cons

    The hours are LONG. When I worked there it was a 50 hour minimum work week, but that usually meant about 60-65 hour. Looking back, the salary didn't justify those hours.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Get an HR department.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    Just so-so. Some opportunity for growth as a consulting firm in general

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Waltham, MA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Waltham, MA

    I have been working at MaPS full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Company is small, there's opportunity to stand out

    Cons

    Life work balance is hard. But they just started a pilot program that ends the day at 6 pm, which is much better than staying late after 7 pm

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  3.  

    Great place to start working

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Market Research Analyst in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Market Research Analyst in Boston, MA

    I worked at MaPS full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Work Life Balance is great

    Cons

    Boring People to work with

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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  5. 5 people found this helpful  

    A classic Principal-Agent problem plagues this company, with finance/banker style hours and misaligned compensation.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Consultant in Waltham, MA
    Former Employee - Consultant in Waltham, MA

    I worked at MaPS full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Insight into the marketing world of Fortune 100 companies, with projects on advertising campaigns, concept tests, and brand image. Potential to advance quickly, though potentially necessitated by the fact that individuals come and go so often.

    The people are continuously said to be one of the reasons why they stay for so long. This is true, though slowly changing. I have easily met some incredibly wonderful and intelligent people at MaPS.

    Cons

    The banality of the work is mind numbing to the point of depressing, with variable deadlines that can be adjusted on a whim by clients and managers, thus creating a frantic rush to finish the assigned soul deadening tasks (all while preaching high quality). When combined with the fact that the number of tasks and time required to complete tasks results in 10-12 hour days, MaPS can feel like the spice mines of Kessel. Let me state here for the record that I have had jobs shoveling horse manure in -5 F temperatures that I enjoy far more than the tasks I was burdened with at MaPS.

    The amount of work a junior level employee receives is highly dependent on the projects to which they are staffed. Each individual is staffed to at least two projects, sometimes resulting in wildly unrealistic deadline conflicts. Some employees can show up at 9:30AM and leave by 7 every day, while some individuals can be stuck working until 2AM multiple nights in a row with managers breathing down their necks looking for something to give the client. Attempts to speak to upper management about the amount of hours one is working results in little to no change, presenting the image that they most likely don't care.

    Then there is the meaninglessness of the work, the sometimes racist or classist style of reports and client based initiatives, the lack of any sort of economic theory, higher level statistics, or coherent business strategy proposed by MaPS to clients. When this is accounted for, one begins to question how this company can even think of calling itself any sort of consulting firm. The lack of interdisciplinary value being created, combined with the fact that the data being gleaned from surveys created by MaPS is worthless for a plethora or reasons creates a disconnect between managers who are looking to add value and create story driven reports and junior staff who look at and work with the data and know the futility of the exercise and inconsequential nature of the data.

    In relation to being unable to add value, resources always seem to be an issue. Sometimes it can be from outside sources like panel vendors, but mostly it's internally based. Projects have trouble getting the technical resources and support as planned. Individuals deemed key to the success of the project by junior staff are at times bullied out of the company at the whim of Vice Presidents and senior partners. Technical issues can create nightmare-esque situations for managers and junior staff alike, bringing projects to a grinding halt or creating massive amounts of rework.

    As I stated in the "Pros" section above, the staff MaPS hires is changing. Most staff come from a privileged upper middle class background, but the staff was non-judgemental, relatively professional, straight forward, honest, and hardworking. Egos have begun to creep into MaPS, however, and backstabbing and manipulation have begun to creep in. Managers push forward timelines to appease clients in ways that are unnecessary, and could only possibly benefit themselves in regards to future promotions. The rat race accelerates after about 2 years at the company, with individuals looking to get the extra leg up in an attempt to make more money (middle management is compensated based on relative performance to peers).

    This creates a mentality within management to always be selling as much as possible as quickly as possible, and let the consequences be damned. The typical cycle of over-promising, under-performing, and over compensating with a high quality and low value product needs to be broken as soon as possible.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Internal Improvements:

    - Encourage efficiency building and collaboration with engineers and others to minimize time spent on mundane project tasks

    - Realign compensation and expectations to accommodate for sheer amount of time spent at the office/compensate for the fact that life outside of MaPS is limited at best (Since we are continuously deemed to be the best in the industry, this should not be an issue. Make yourself competitive to BCG, McKinsey & Co, Charles River Group, etc.)

    -Upgrade physical capital and technological processes to be cutting edge (this is finally occurring with Tableau workshops, though started as a client based initiative)

    - Promote more free time and internal office activities to distract from some of the drudgery of the job (Look out for signs of the doldrums, including, but not limited to glossed over stares, contagious yawns, and loud sighs)

    Labor Improvements:

    - Shift the most boring and tedious tasks to interns/co-ops/unskilled labor positions to create time to add value by linking data to academic and real world theory or data outside of what is produced via the surveys created at MaPS

    - Solve resource issues by hiring more aggressively in technical positions, even if it means changing the current pay structure

    - Make the junior level positions more of a traditional job and less of a life, because MaPS isn't important (MaPS doesn't save lives, stop terrorist attacks, fight real fires, or do anything materially important in regards to enriching peoples lives). (If you require long hours by junior staff, then allow them to skive off work at some point in the future. Make the 50 hour work week a two way street so that if an individual works 40 hours in the first three days of the week, then they need only work 10 hours between the last two days.)

    Product Improvements:

    - Commit to becoming a true consulting firm (strategy based) or drop the misnomer of calling yourself a 'market research and "consulting" firm', because this creates a misalignment of expectations between clients, MaPS, and potential hires, and junior staff

    - Test run placing some individuals on a single project to create ownership of the product and expertise in the area studied on the project, while simultaneously giving employees the tools to create real value (SPSS, statistical training and knowledge, application of economic, political, and market theory).

    -Incorporate industry knowledge, sister and parent company products, economic metrics and figures in an attempt to create actionable reports that reflect market conditions

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  6. 4 people found this helpful  

    Crazy opportunity to learn, but also kind of a sweatshop

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Market Research Analyst
    Current Employee - Market Research Analyst

    I have been working at MaPS full-time

    Pros

    One thing that I've found to be spot-on with the other Glassdoor reviews (at least the more recent ones) is that the people who work their are incredible. The vast majority are mid-twentysomethings, funny, social, and shockingly bright. You basically have a built in social network of amazing people, and the office atmosphere is casual enough you can joke around a lot as long as you obviously still get your work done. But even the older partners are social and fun to be around.

    Professionally, there is a lot of room to learn here, especially if you're willing to stick around a couple of years and move up the food chain. As a research analysts (the entry level role) you learn an insane amount of Excel skills, and start getting experience reporting the "story in the data." All of the clients are at least Fortune 100 companies, and even the analysts help out on projects that can go straight to the CEO.

    Compared to other companies, the compensation is actually quite good - the base salary isn't bad, and the benefits package is pretty thorough. Also 21 paid days off is WAY above average (good luck trying to actually use them though).

    Cons

    The two biggest struggles I've had working here are with the hours and employee turnover.

    It's a good thing the people at MaPS are fun to be around, because prepare for work to be your social life. The other reviews really don't exaggerate the situation: you will be working from 9am to 8pm Mon-Thurs, but more like 9-5 on Friday. People joke about feeling guilty "leaving early" at 7pm when they're projects aren't busy. Research analysts are staffed on 2-3 projects depending on staffing needs. Different projects have different reporting schedules, some are pretty constant month-to-month, others are crazy busy quarterly or bi-annually, but relatively slow the rest of the year. If you are on one of the quarterly or bi-annual reporting projects, be prepared to be working 60 hour weeks for about a month. If you have the fortune to be staffed on two projects like that, then you're really in for a treat. That being said, realize that MaPS is a heavily consulting-minded company, and those sorts of hours are accepted in the consulting industry. Just be very aware of what you might be getting into.

    A related issue is the employee turnover. Burnout with these kind of hours is not all that surprising, and the company is actually set up to accommodate this, for better or for worse. They constantly are hiring new employees, but that is because they occasionally go through month-long periods of having one employe leave every week. Usually it's research analysts who have put in their "2 years" and then moved on, but occasionally it's project managers. Unfortunately that means your project teams constantly have to play catch up and onboard and train new team members. If a project manager leaves, you might be stuck for months on a project without a project manager. You get an opportunity to take on more responsibilities (and this will defiantly show up in your annual career review), which is great if your other projects aren't busy. Otherwise that starts to pile up fast...

    The fact that this kind of turnover is expected and seen as acceptable kind of gives the place a sweatshop-like atmosphere. Honestly I think most of the employees are so young because they are the only ones who would be willing to put up with those kind of hours.

    That's not to say that the hours aren't worth it. If you are serious about any sort of career in market research or consulting, you will get a LOT out of working here (and people who do stick around have no trouble finding some pretty impressive next jobs). Just be ready to commit a lot if you take this on.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Show your employees you value them more! Actually encourage the advisers to check in with their advisees during busy times to keep tabs on people getting burnt out - that kind of stuff can be prevented. Beer on Fridays and company holidays are great, but those aren't that much of an incentive if you're struggling with working 60+ hours a week!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  7.  

    Challenging but extremely rewarding - working here allows you to excel anywhere else

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Consultant
    Former Employee - Consultant

    I worked at MaPS full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    - Very smart, hardworking people (a large majority of the senior level employees are people you respect on a deep level and aim to emulate in your own career)
    - Great clients, good exposure to several industries
    - You'll gain skills you'll use for life - I learned more as an entry-level employee than I would anywhere else
    - Your work might become your life, but for the most part it's exciting and engaging work - you'll find yourself wanting to talk about aspects of your work with friends and family because it can be truly interesting

    Cons

    - Your happiness and work/life balance at MaPS is extremely dependent on your projects. If you get stuck on a poorly managed project there is no easy way out - this can be the difference between loving your job at MaPS and quitting earlier than you expected
    - The is a formal review process which is GREAT but it can feel like feedback on managers isn't taken as seriously as it should be - emphasizing management development at MaPS would go far to improve retention among RAs/Consultants.
    - There is not enough emphasis on getting work done efficiently - wasting time in details is rampant, which can directly cause the late hours lack of work/life balance. Project managers should be encouraged by senior management to maintain quality AND efficiency of work.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Even when resources are short, it pays to assist, discipline or fire employees that are consistently given poor reviews or are not pulling their own weight. No matter how much you think you need headcount, it can be more harmful to let toxic employees ruin the experience for countless other Mapsters.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  8. 1 person found this helpful  

    Hi Pressure, you work extremely long hours and it's tedious work, but you have to opportunity to move up very quickly.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Research Analyst
    Current Employee - Research Analyst

    I have been working at MaPS full-time

    Pros

    -Smart people
    -Good opportunities
    -Good experience if you can get promoted
    -even if your not promoted the experience you get here should put you in a good position to get a new job

    Cons

    -you do work a lot of hours, and don't get paid overtime
    -your hourly wage is probably around par with other job's though your salary is about the same
    -Your early experience is extremely tedious and does not really involve a lot of thinking

    It's difficult to find a place to put real comment's on glassdoor so I'll just put them here:
    I would not recommend this job to a friend even though i think it's a good career move. There is a lot of work, and no real time for a personal life. If that works for you then this is the place you want to be. But I do not think that the reality of working here would suit many people and, while they will tell you so when you start, I think they'd rather you not apply at all if you aren't ready for that.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9.  

    A Very Difficult Place To Work

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Senior Consultant in Waltham, MA
    Former Employee - Senior Consultant in Waltham, MA

    I worked at MaPS full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    MaPS hires top notch employees and you get to work with really cool companies. They are good at what they do, and try to teach you the ins and outs of market research. There are fun parties and firm events. Everyone is really young and you can make some good friends.

    Cons

    There is no work life balance, forget about your girlfriend/boyfriend. Following the process seems to be the best way to get ahead, and questioning the process is a bad idea. Promotions are very political, some people get ahead just because of who they know. Turnover is horrendous and really was a drag on the environment.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Take what we have to say to heart. We feel like you don't care what we think. You hire really smart people, listen to us..

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  10. 2 people found this helpful  

    Good to learn a few things then move on

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Consultant in Waltham, MA
    Current Employee - Senior Consultant in Waltham, MA

    I have been working at MaPS full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Flexible working hours (can be long sometimes). Exposure to many industries and interesting studies. Funds for team-building available.

    Cons

    Higher turnover recently. Junior work can be tedious. Though open office, not enough interactions. One can pass you in the hall way while pretending that they did not see you...

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  11. 3 people found this helpful  

    Some of the people are nice and smart, but I understand why there is high turnover.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at MaPS

    Pros

    Some people are nice and smart.

    Cons

    Long hours. Suburban location. Tedious work and little responsibility at lower levels. Poor management.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO

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