Meditech

www.meditech.com

Meditech Reviews in Framingham, MA

Updated December 5, 2014
Updated December 5, 2014
177 Reviews
3.0
177 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Meditech President & CEO Howard Messing
Howard Messing
93 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Annual bonus, working from home opportunities, good work life balance (in 29 reviews)

  • Benefits are great and so are the bonuses when they come around (in 21 reviews)


Cons
  • Low starting salary (36-37k for my position) (in 20 reviews)

  • Limited advancement opportunities (even with 100% of non-entry level hiring coming from within company) (in 14 reviews)

More Highlights

29 Employee Reviews Back to all reviews

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Great place for recent graduates

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Cares about employees. Great benefits. Majority of staff very friendly and willing to help other staff members. Reduced cost for food. Family oriented Very stable and reliable product with very large and loyal user base. Company very stable. Upper management very approachable and caring attitude.

    Cons

    Management positions filled only from inside promotions with minimal outside influence. Some managers very difficult to work under, not open to new ideas, and do not know how to manage.. No privacy at workstations. No HR department.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Need to hire some outside professionals into management positions. Create HR department so employees have somewhere to go for help.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Not worth the experience

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Programmer/Analyst in Framingham, MA
    Current Employee - Programmer/Analyst in Framingham, MA

    I have been working at Meditech

    Pros

    The health insurance is good

    Cons

    The company uses it own programming language which renders you immediately useless in the job market. the pay is so low that even if you do make it to an interview they will not take you seriously. The people that remain here do so because they are able to skate by and get promoted, there is very little as far as experienced talent goes here and those that are talented get overworked and become disgruntled because it is not appreciated. Looking into the market for similar jobs in the same cities that the buildings are located in it becomes blatantly obvious how low the pay is. As a programmer you will start off around $20,000 less than the lowest paid 10% with the same or similar jobs in the same area. This place is not worth what they try to tell you when you start. Meditech used to be able to say that they offer great benefits that other companies do not, that is not true anymore. Most tech companies offer comparable benefit which renders their claim moot.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    bump up the salaries of you skilled labor you are no where close to market value, this will help you retain the good workers that you are greatly undervaluing. And clean out the people who are just collecting a paycheck and treating work and meetings like a social club.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  3.  

    Excellent place to work, just TERRIBLE starting pay...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Programmer/Analyst in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Programmer/Analyst in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    i was working as a programmer in the interface group (called NMI.. dealing with interfacing with other non-MEDITECH platforms).. and the work was definitely very challenging at times (and i have a masters in electrical engineering)..

    job stability

    pretty relaxed atmosphere

    lots of young people

    Cons

    the starting salary is disgusting, i don't care if you make the raises and bonuses equivalent to a competent salary 5 years down the line.. it doesn't mean anything if you start people off so low that their banks go into negatives every month

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    don't start people off this low

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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  5.  

    It was fun. Everyone was really nice and seemed to enjoy working there. I never had an issue

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Product Development in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Product Development in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech as an intern (less than a year)

    Pros

    Nice people. Great benefits. The company outing in the summer is awesome. Seems easy to move up and excel.

    Cons

    Have you be your own person. People will not find ways to improve you and do not care about you unless you speak up.

  6.  

    Great Place

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Supervisor in Framingham, MA
    Current Employee - Supervisor in Framingham, MA

    I have been working at Meditech full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Great benefits, flexibility, work/life balance, ability to change roles

    Cons

    salary get better longer you're there along with profit sharing and bonus

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  7. 2 people found this helpful  

    Lack of leadership and vision is disappointing but the summer picnic is awesome.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Sales in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Sales in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Job security is good but also leads to a lot of dead beats hanging on too long. Their buildings and grounds are very nice. Healthcare plan is good.

    Cons

    Lack of project management, accountability are major issues. They are more than happy to let top performers across the organization leave and plug the gap with mediocre talent.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Bring in some fresh blood into your C level and director positions.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  8. 2 people found this helpful  

    An excellent foundation for a career if you can handle stress

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Senior Applications Specialist in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Senior Applications Specialist in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Meditech hires college graduates with no experience in computers and gives them the foundation to enter the HIS field.

    Raises are generally quite good (first year review I got an extra $2,400 / year, second year I received an additional $4,800 / year).

    Near ironclad job security.

    If you decide you want to change career paths once you've been there awhile, Meditech will oblige and will start training you in something else that you have no experience/education in. They really do offer you the ability to start on just about any career path (that they have a use for).

    Excellent health benefits.

    Cons

    Meditech hires out of college and effectively trains in a trial by fire. It's incredibly stressful, particularly for people who are coming right out of college.

    The starting pay isn't great... however, as I reminded people when I worked there, that starting salary was based on them hiring you to work on computers when all you had was a college degree in a non-technical major... you got what you could negotiate for.

    Ironclad job security means there are a number of employees who did just enough not to get fired for long enough to hit the 'tenure' mark and then their effort dropped.

    No 401k, company will claim that they have profit sharing which is their retirement solution instead of 401k.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Beef up the training, a lot of the stress of job stems from having little information on hand about the software but being expected to act the "expert" for customers.

    Formalize documentation of code changes are hold Development to fulfilling that format

    Recommends
    No opinion of CEO
  9. 2 people found this helpful  

    Pay is sub par for the market, job stability is impressive.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Applications Specialist in Framingham, MA
    Current Employee - Applications Specialist in Framingham, MA

    I have been working at Meditech full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    The profit sharing and stock options are impressive if you put 30 years into the company. I've never felt fear of layoffs or termination. Management will listen to your input and try to move you into a position that best suits you.

    Cons

    Pay is very low... Raises are almost nonexistent. Hours are flexible as long as you want to work 9-530. Promotions are also poor, they are promotions of responsibility and often not worth it. Being a "Senior Specialist" offers no more cash or benefits for the title. The positions are made up titles to compensate for zero vertical movement available in the company. All moves for those coming in unless some one dies or quits are horizontal movements.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    There is a disconnect between upper management and the troops on the front line. Middle managers are extremely hit or miss and can make or break your experience at the company. Most managers in my 7 year tenure are just above useless. They get in the way more often than not and love creating process/red tape.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10. 2 people found this helpful  

    Great career starter, no long term growth.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Applications Specialist in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Applications Specialist in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Overall good company culture and a great entry level job.

    Meditech teaches new college graduates how to operate in the professional world.

    Good training program and a great way to get introduced to Healthcare IT industry.

    You don't bring work home with you.

    Cons

    Terrible compensation plan.

    No career growth potential.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Should introduce incentive plans for high achievers, this would keep some of the little talent that stays at Meditech.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  11. 4 people found this helpful  

    A Nice Place to Visit but You Don't Want to Live There

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Programmer/Analyst in Framingham, MA
    Former Employee - Programmer/Analyst in Framingham, MA

    I worked at Meditech full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    - They're open to all majors. I was a linguistics major. The manager who interviewed me had been a geography major. One of the best programmers in my group was a Philosophy major. If you're a college student looking for a first job in technology, whatever your major may be is fine with Meditech where other companies might not give you a thought.

    - For programmer positions the interview includes a test that teaches you some of the language but largely looks at your logic/analytical skills. Personally I think that's really the best method.

    - Like everyone else says, they have good benefits. 90%of health/dental paid. For an entire family plan with spouse + children I was paying about $250/mo. Sweet deal.

    - They take really good care of their grounds/buildings. I think it's vastly underappreciated. It's nice to take a stroll and enjoy walkways around Lowderbrook. Have lunch in the beautiful atrium in Canton. In the winter, walkways and parking lots kept impeccably well plowed/shoveled/sanded. If there were any problems with my cube/area, put in a ticket and quickly taken care of. The operations staff are phenomenal.

    - The annual bonus gets quite nice after a few years. It's a percentage of past 5 years pay so it keeps getting better each year.

    - The company picnic is awesome. Only thing I really miss. It's mostly done by volunteers. I would highly recommend you volunteer. It's a lot of fun for the kids and you get free Meditech swag in thanks. :)

    - As others have said, generally good work/life balance. They tend to be very family friendly in general.

    - For Other Mommies: Really nice mothers rooms. door lock, very nice cushy chair, lots of magazines, has its own mini fridge for milk so you're not stuck putting milk in the communal kitchen fridge.

    Cons

    - Like everyone else has said, salary way below industry and it never catches up. Raises are in $1200 increments determined at annual review. So after your review you might get a raise of $0/$1200/$2400/$3600 or rarely $4800. I honestly think MT expects everyone to buy stock. The long-termers who were doing well that I talked to, that's how they did it. It often outpaced their salary. Or they hit cap on the profit sharing plan.

    - The annual bonus does not make up for the low salary. Some people try to claim that. Leaving Meditech got me an immediate 33% raise even when I included the bonus into my MT pay.

    - Raises should be better tied to performance. Most people expect their raise to be based on their performance and group budget/company success. That's it. At Meditech the other salaries in your group are also taken into account. This was more of a problem for the long-termers like 10+ years when the rest of the group was newer. They said it didn't matter how hard they worked or well they did, they'd still get a $0 or at most $1200 because they already outpaced the group. There's a surefire way to kill senior employee motivation.

    - Getting a promotion doesn't necessarily get you a raise either. It merely raises your theoretical pay cap (they don't have hard caps last I checked). It can be raised but doesn't have to be. So oftentimes being promoted means taking on more responsibility now but not seeing any benefit until your next review comes around.

    - On that note, advancement potential for those of a technical mind but not interested in management is limited. You've got Programmer > Senior Programmer > Computer Scientist. That's it. Computer Scientist appointments are few and kind of a big deal so you see quite a few folk languishing at Senior Programmer. If management is your kind of thing, there's more options available to you. But for geeks who want to grow in skill rather than clout it's very narrow.

    - Because the company only hires entry level and promotes from within, leadership promotion seems more like Survivor or attrition warfare than who would make a good supervisor or manager. In areas of high turnover, the one who lasts the longest is usually the one tapped. Highly motivated people who want to be managers/leaders usually leave before they get to that point.

    - Pay/promotion aside, let's talk about other motivating factors. Appreciation/praise? Largely depends on your supervisor. Sometimes customers will appreciate what you do but not often. Freedom/Autonomy? Again, largely depends on your supervisor. Mine was fantastic but some micromanage hard. Learning opportunities/skill growth? The main reason why the reviews here recommend this only as a starter job. You will learn a great deal in your first years here but after a certain point it will stop. That's the point I would recommend trying to transfer to learn new/different skills. In the same position, once you've learned what you need to do the job proficiently there's almost no encouragement to go beyond.

    - As implied by the last point, your supervisor can make your Meditech experience awesome or awful. Given the tenure/outlast modality, I unfortunately saw a lot of the latter. This was a killer for group morale, hampered or outright discouraged employees' development, would cause more turnover and oftentimes it was difficult to transfer out from under such supervisors. Which brings me to my last point...

    - They must be in a state of denial over their internal mobility if they think it's great. Their transfer policies are already longer than my huge entry here but there's no oversight of those policies either. I've seen what look like vengeful sups block transfers of those under them. Those people wound up leaving. None of my cases were that bad but it did take me 2 years to get my first transfer. Trying for a 2nd transfer 7 years in, it was assigned almost a year out (well past a policy that says should be in 90 days) which is when I finally threw in the towel.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    1) Be willing to hire into sup/manager roles. That way you can get people who are good at management into those positions rather than whoever hasn't quit yet. I know you're concerned you want supervisors/managers to understand what the people under them do, but that's what training is for. It's easier to teach technical skills than it is to teach leadership skills. Have you ever noticed your training for new supervisors focuses on trying to teach leadership? That should tell you something about your promotion practices.

    2) Shift your focus to how you can gain and maintain loyalty rather than assuming it as a given. There's an insidious mindset of "Anyone who wouldn't have us is someone we wouldn't want anyway." Almost like shielding your ego at a company level rather than asking what happened. This mindset creeps it's way into your actions like not having real exit interviews, not rehiring staff who have left, having a difficult transfer process that can easily be shut down by a few people, not having real career/skill development for employees ("Working the Generation Gap" don't count). These kinds of actions come across as hubris and taking your staff for granted. I'm not the only one to get that vibe. I think someone else on Glassdoor put it as "Meditech acts like they're the last coke in the desert." Yes you're a successful company but how much better would you be if you retained your top talent and improved knowledge and motivation across the board? Put your employees first and they will in turn put you first.

    3) Realize that the compensation model that has worked for the long-termers will not work for the new blood. The long-termers have a good deal of stock and make most their money on that or having capped their profit share so the salary is less important. They happened to get in while you were a young company with a great deal of growth. You are a mature company now and will not grow like that again. So for newer/younger employees the stock will not compensate for the depressed salary. Newer employees the compensation model will need to focus on salary and bonus.

    4) I can appreciate the difficulty in trying to balance the satisfaction of long-termers vs newer employees. The long-termers feeling like they will not see a reward no matter how hard they work. The newer employees feeling like the working poor on salaries that make it difficult to pay ever-larger student loans and survive. Have you ever considered starting a loan assistance program? Student loans are the biggest financial woe I hear (and tuition reimbursement doesn't help there). Some employers are already using LRAPs to get and retain employees. For the long-termers, I realize raises aren't always possible (how much is a senior programmer really worth?) Have you ever considered service awards to recognize and reward their loyalty and longevity? The company I work for now does that and while they may be things like nice watches or jewelry instead of money, the employees seem to really enjoy them and keep them with pride.

    5) Development Specific: Quality guys, quality! Stop rushing to get things out the door. If it needs more testing, so be it. That's how you keep getting so many bugs. And stop obsessing over getting the bug counts down; you're only forcing people to go for low hanging fruit. They can bang out 5 easy DTSs in a day to get your bug counts down. Or they can spend all day working on that one massive issue. Guess which one your customers want? Dimes to donuts, the massive issue. Focus on bug impact over raw bug numbers, and focus on testing and quality over deadlines. And while I'm wishful thinking, have your dev groups by NPR/M-AT instead of 5.x and 6.x. There is no reason to have separate 5.x/6.x groups for things like ABS, GENFINS, EMPFINS, or LAB. You've only split your resources and made more confusion when those areas of 5.x and 6.x run into the same issues all being NPR-based.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

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