Mission Renaissance Art Class

www.fineartclasses.com
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Mission Renaissance Art Class Reviews

Updated August 12, 2015
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  1. Helpful (1)

    Unique; Good job for young people, don't plan on career

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Manager in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Manager in Los Angeles, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at Mission Renaissance Art Class full-time

    Pros

    If you like classical/realistic art, you won't find a better method of instruction. I gave M:R 4 stars overall mainly because of the method. I was really talented and accomplished before working here and even so, learning their method improved my skill dramatically. You have to embrace their technique and go in with an open mind, but if you do, you will benefit, no doubt at all. Most of the employees are super fun and charismatic. They do a good job of hiring the right people for them. If you are young and energetic, this is a great work environment. I made life-long friends here. If you love teaching art, but don't want to do it in a school system or open your own place, Mission: Renaissance is pretty much the best.

    Cons

    Short term job only, not a career, although they don't sell it that way. Some folks have been there more than 10 years, but they are the exception. Average teacher works there for 3-4 years tops. I was there for a long time and thought I would work there for decades, but when it was over, I realized how limited the opportunities are for most people. They promote it like you can make a ton of money doing it, but the big boss man and his son are the only ones there who will be able to afford a decent life in retirement, and trust me, they make goood money. The work schedule is not feasible for people with kids. There have been other people on here and on the web who talk about Scientology being "used" (the owner and Exec Director are members), but it is not a big deal unless you are spooked by the very idea of Scientology. If you are, then you will probably be looking for evidence of brain-washing from day one and be miserable, so avoid this place if that describes you. They do use certain things inspired by their Scientology training, but it is all very common stuff like how to improve your communication skills, how to help people learn by defining words...nothing crazy. I actually liked the information, and they never turned me into a Scientologist, so I just roll my eyes at those other comments. However, their intense belief in the god of statistics is a turn off. They want increasing numbers and they want them always. No excuses. It is pressure, and definitely a turn off to the kind of people who just want to teach art, make a living, and be happy. The other thing is the cost of their classes. The management talk a good game about creating a world-wide renaissance in art, but that goal always seems less important than making plenty of money (for the top anyway), so classes are only affordable to the upper class. This model is easy to justify when the guy calling the shots makes a quarter of a million a year or more, and the teachers scrape by to simply exist, but how that helps create a global renaissance of fine art is beyond me. Don't get me wrong, if you can build a successful business, you should make a profit, but don't delude yourselves into thinking this is a part of some altruistic mission. The employees are there to make you, the E.D., rich, and in exchange you pay them enough to eat (barely) and give them some really great art training...that's the real deal, stop it with all the other PR BS.

    Advice to Management

    The team is doing all the little things right (less so on the big things), and running an art school this size ain't easy, so kudos on that. It was fun. Kudos on that, too. The Executive Dir "knows best", so I'm sure he won't take any advice he didn't already come up with himself...but just in case: Figure out how to get this method in the hands of millions, not just the ones WITH MILLION$, and you'll be true to your name. Oh, and lighten up on the vacations...for goodness sake. Just because you live and breathe the place doesn't mean your $30K/yr assistant instructor should have to also.


  2. Bad management, poor pay

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Art Instructor in Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Art Instructor in Los Angeles, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    Pros

    Getting to teach kids art.

    Cons

    Pay is confusing. They make it sounds like you are going to make 40k a year, but when your hired and you go through their bazaar training routine (its very Scientology, the owners are and they have under-tones of it in their business handbook, and Scientology techniques are used to manage the studios) and at the end of it, you barely get any classes....this goes on forever. I gave up as it wasn't worth my time.

    Advice to Management

    Re-think you management "tools" and let kids learn art!


  3. Very Good Company to Work for but With Caveats

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Instructor
    Current Employee - Instructor
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    Pros

    Excellent training program in how to teach art in a logical and consistent manner and your art, even if you are well trained, will definitely improve. If you don't know anything about art, you can still teach because they teach you everything you need to know to be a good instructor and you are paid to be trained. Once trained, you have one free class a week. You can buy your paints and supplies at a discount. Almost everyone at HQ (management) is available to support you in teaching and can help advise in handling situations that may come up. As an assistant instructor it's a fun part time job. If you are a program director, it's a full time job.

    Cons

    As an instructor you get your schedule for the week that is coming up on Friday, and the work week is from Sunday through Saturday, so if you are an assistant or instructor you will have a really hard time planning your week to come as some weeks you may be working a lot and others very little or not at all. Financial raises only happen as you get trained up in teaching and they will only train you to what they need, so you can be stuck at a class pay for quite a while, even as the cost of living goes up, and some pay classes take a long time to complete. As an instructor there are no benefits including no paid vacation. You might be doing a lot of driving to get to a studio and only teach one class. Travel time is not covered, but some mileage is - but that has to be arranged beforehand. If you are teaching 3 or 4 classes, which happens on weekends, it might be hard to get any kind of break even though it's required by law.

    Advice to Management

    Give regular raises to assistants, instructors, and program directors. Have a newsletter for instructors that can be accessed on line on our home computers.


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  5. Overall a decent place to work, but not a place to retire.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    Pros

    You get to teach art to some amazing students. You are fully trained and aware of what is expected of you. Which makes it easy to do your job. If you are not a great artist you will get better with the artistic training the company provides to all it's staff no matter what department you work in. Once you are a program director you are in charge of running your own studio which is very rewarding. You build relationship with students and parents at this location and will have some students for years and get to watch them grow up and make leaps and bounds with their art.

    Cons

    You will have to drive all over the city and get stuck in traffic regularly. If you are not posted in one studio location be fully prepared to commute long distances and even occasionally if you are posted. If you become a program director especially if you are an adult program director or are highly trained it is difficult to get time off for a vacation. With black out days and not enough people trained to the highest levels (due to the lengthy but excellent training program) it's hard for these positions to take time off without significantly planning ahead. So last minute vacations are not very possible here. The benefits are bad, minimal health care and just plain forget about retirement planning.


  6. Working at Mission Renaissance was a wonderful experience!!

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Program Director
    Former Employee - Program Director
    Recommends

    I worked at Mission Renaissance Art Class full-time

    Pros

    Being a part of helping, teaching or coaching children and adults become the artists they always dreamed of being is quite possibly the best job ever!

    Cons

    Travel sometimes can be a pain!


  7. teach art, struggle at first, get your hopes up, find the man behind the curtain....

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Program Director
    Former Employee - Program Director
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at Mission Renaissance Art Class full-time

    Pros

    you get to teach art, and that's pretty cool. they will teach you with a proven method (that works) and turn you into an artist first, and then a teacher of the same art. even if you already have an education in art, it will no doubt fill in the gaps of your past training.

    Cons

    you think you are just a teacher, but in fact you are a student. you are also, primarily, a salesperson who's priority is to 'grow the numbers'. numbers=students, which is how you get paid. in theory, the formula could/should work, but there are numbers, or enrollment, that they expect you to hit which are harder than what they tell you. enrollment is monthly so you are at the whim of the public; if and when they want to take classes. here's the other kicker... you only get paid if they actually attend class! of course you have absolutely no control over this as most of these people are extremely wealthy and often flake out on class, or take frequent vacations, or are currently involved in a million other activities! the reason the students are primarily of the upper class is because the tuition is too high! you really do enjoy teaching, but you are so worried about increasing your numbers that you can't truly enjoy what should be an enjoyable job! the school is located in southern california which has extremely high cost of living and the salary they pay you is just enough to barely get by, at best. now, on to management......im not going to divulge every detail, but be careful what you say and who you say it to. they will try to 'audit' you and, through certain training 'technology', try to control you. i know this sounds crazy, but it's true and it sneaks up on you until you start to feel crazy with self doubt. im not going to publicly throw anybody under the buss here, sorry to disappoint, but do a quick search for the company and some of the top results ought to fill you in on the rest. i hope you're able to put 2 and 2 together and choose not to work here and subject yourself to their behavior. im more sad than anything that my employment didnt work out because while i was teaching it was one of the most enjoyable things ive ever done. their system is rather flawed, and while they are probably aware of it, they are too stubborn (and behind the times) to change their ways

    Advice to Management

    your marketing dept has got to get with the times and be more aggressive; it really shouldn't be the program director's job to market the program! you are losing good instructors at an alarming rate due to the low pay and high expectations.



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