Neal R. Gross & Company Reviews

6 reviews filtered by
  • Any Location
  • Any Job Title
  • Any Status
Employment Status

Reset
2.8
Rating Trends
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
(no image)
Neal R. Gross
4 Ratings

6 Employee Reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1. Great job to build professional experience post-grad

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Client Services Representative in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Client Services Representative in Washington, DC

    I worked at Neal R. Gross & Company full-time (More than a year)

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    From day one, you are given numerous responsibilities that ultimately prepare you for the working world. You are able to see how the public sector works while working in the private sector. Management is friendly and is very accomodating (ex: sickness, days off, administrative help). The beauty of the job is that your workload is never the same and each day you can expect to be doing something new. Also, the pay is GREAT coming directly out of college. LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION!!! The office is located right in the heart of Logan Circle!

    Cons

    The main con regarding this job is the lack of upward mobility. Also, some holidays are working days for employees. Working with most of our clients in the public sector, it seems unusual for employees to have to work when most government employees have off.

    Advice to Management

    Allow more room for growth in the company. Organize a tier structure in which employees have incentive to do better and earn more compensation for the work they are doing. Maybe implement an evaluation period where positive feedback may be given back to the employees. All in all, keep up the good work.


  2. Helpful (1)

    Great in a pinch, but NOT your dream job

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Neal R. Gross & Company

    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    There is little to say about the pros of this company; however, it does have some accolades. If you are more laid back individual who works well in solitude, than this a "better" fit for you. Clients do not come to the office so office staff are not required to where professional attire. You can pretty much come in there wearing anything and you will be fine. The office is pretty much two town-homes combined so you can imagine that there are simply rooms with desks in them. (This is what I meant about solitude) There is little interaction with other employees unless they are in your room. They can be very generous with lunch times and any additional times you may need off.

    Cons

    There are some serious issues with this company. I dreaded walking up those steps everday. In short, the company has in-betweeners, stuckers, and those who needed an income. In-betweeners are those actively looking for other employment. The stuckers are those who've been there the longest and know the most; they can't leave (or maybe they're just too comfortable). This what hands a very stressful job. I had to drink everyday JUST to wake up in the morning and get ready for work. For a company that is one of the oldest in the city, it seriously is behind the curve compared to companies who've been up for less than 10 years. The company, in my opinion, is like a 15th century kingdom. There is the tyrannical king, the spoiled prince, the loyal knight. The tyrannical king, the CEO, is a serious micro-manager and VERY old-school businessman. I was "told" he was very passionate about this company so he expects the best. BUT....There have been more than one occasion where he yells and verbally abuses his employees. The attack is so harsh that most know when he comes for blood. It's either do what he says or "off with your head at the guillotine." (he won't actually fire you though unless you're THAT bad of a screw up). Great guy, but TERRIBLE leader and manager. I felt that it was my job to make him money than what is for me to genuinely absorb and enjoy the experience there. It was very difficult to accomplish anything because he was always concerned about the performance of his employees. The spoiled prince is simply a title in this instance. He's a good guy as well, but most (if not all) feel that he is self-entitled because he is the son of the CEO. Some are even a little upset because he got an "executive-level" position compared to those who have been with the company much longer. He knows a lot, but it is obvious he still is inexperienced. The loyal knight has been with company just as long as the CEO. He does the serious grunt work, kind of sad. Some claim that there is a structure but there is not. In business, it would be considered a matrix system because you essentially have three bosses who can tell you at anytime what you need to do. VERY unorganized. It was also rumored that there were mid-level management, but if anything they are the stuckers who've been there the longest. The only ways you could possibly be "promoted" or (what I call change yuor signature line in your email) is you were wed into the family or put in at least 15 years. I was informed salary increases were only possible if you could convince you them of rising cost of living.

    Advice to Management

    You try look great from the outside, but fail to understand whose the bread and butter of your company. If you constantly mistreat your employees than it is you who will be paying the price. You need to expand your resources and become an exemplary company, but that WILL not happen with the current management style. You need to parallel your resources to what your clients need AND to what your employees need. Remember, that most of your employees are generation-y and they have certain expectations about the modern workplace


  3. The manager is an idiot

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Neal R. Gross & Company full-time

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Everybody needs a job. Right? Can't wait to be there when someone finally nuts up and says an honest word, like, say, "arrogant" or "incompetent'. You know, like in that movie The Green Mile. Don't want anyone to have a boo-boo fit though.

    Cons

    The person pretending to run the shop is absolutely clueless. He seems to find his interactions with people to be amusing, as if his state school education -- W&N is a state school -- ordains him to be a judgmental ... at his tender young age. Last I checked, Mensa did not require an AAERT certification. Nevertheless, how can a court reporter effectively manage work? Uh, he doesn't.

    Advice to Management

    You keep losing valuable people. You need to put your foot down. And your court reporters need to correct the embarrassing grammatical errors on your website. Looks bad.


  4. Is this helpful? The community relies on everyone sharing – Add Anonymous Review


  5. Long hours with little opportunity for advancement

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Court Reporter in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Court Reporter in Washington, DC

    I worked at Neal R. Gross & Company full-time (Less than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    The work done as a court reporter is not very challenging at all - simply go to a location, record people saying things, and then deliver the results back to the company. In addition, you will get the opportunity to visit a number of courts, government agencies, and private companies in the DC area.

    Cons

    The atmosphere at the company was unpleasant, verging sometimes on unprofessional. Management didn't get along, shouted arguments were common, and employees rarely got the opportunity to interact with one another. Though you'll be around other people while you're visiting various agencies and courtrooms, they will view you strictly as a functionary who should be ignored and not interacted with. Don't expect to form any personal or professional relationships with the people you'll see on a daily basis. There's essentially no room for advancement - once you start as a court reporter, that's your job. There was a considerable amount of turnover given how displeased some of my colleagues were with their positions once they realized what it was like. Finally, the hours of the job are very unpredictable. While you may be finished with one day by 3 p.m., another might take you until 11 p.m. - and the latter is much more common than the former. You'll be hard-pressed to find any time to manage a personal life in this position.


  6. conscientious employer with good benefits, excellent staff and great work environment/location

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC

    I have been working at Neal R. Gross & Company full-time (More than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    The staff here is excellent. Intelligent people with great attitude and hard working demeanor. Compensation is good and there are opportunities for career advancement. There are also retirement benefits and company matching as well as excellent health care coverage. The main office HQ is located in a great and very accessible part of DC. Certain positions offer opportunity for travel both in the US and abroad. Hours are fair and most employees are not expected to work overtime (except for rare instances). Upper management is understanding and accessible/available at all times (unlike at many other companies). Employees are not micromanaged and given responsibility once they've proved their competence.

    Cons

    Expectations for work performance are high but in-line with other high-performing companies that I've worked at. Work load is cyclical with the nature of the business so sometimes you are totally slammed and sometimes you have a lighter load. Company culture could be stronger (i.e. more after-work events, team building exercises etc--though sometimes it's hard to get current employees to partake in events when they are happening).

    Advice to Management

    Continue to be accessible and available to the employees. Continue to encourage employees to grow and take on more responsibility both within their position and within the company. Continue to provide and add employee benefits. Create a better review process both in regards to compensation and also actual work performance.


  7. Helpful (2)

    If you're flexible, don't need a lot of positive reinforcement, and like having intelligent coworkers, it's a good fit.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Court Reporter in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Court Reporter in Washington, DC

    I have been working at Neal R. Gross & Company

    Doesn't Recommend
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    Coworkers tend to be very intelligent, compensation is high for a job with so few entry requirements (need any undergrad degree and to pass a difficult verbal intelligence test), easy to get unpaid time off with little notice, workload tends to be cyclical with the rest of D.C., e.g. August and the holiday season have a light workload, employees are salaried rather than hourly, some work travel

    Cons

    Zero opportunity for advancement, no retirement matching, start with five paid vacation days a year, management varies between semi-benevolent disinterest and absurd demands of perfection varying with the moods of the managers, management by memo whenever someone makes a mistake, hours vary wildly with usually one day's notice and include evenings, overtime is uncompensated for employees (but employer charges clients for overtime anyway), pricing of services to clients is purposefully obscured so employees won't realize how little they are paid relative to company income, little to no praise for good work, as one coworker puts it, "if you don't hear anything from management, you are doing a fantastic job"

    Advice to Management

    Don't be afraid of telling your very intelligent employees more about how the business operates. They already know they're getting soaked. Own up to it and explain where the rest of money goes if it's a legit expense, or tell them you just want it all for yourself. To retain employees, institute better benefits for employees or up their pay if it's too much of a hassle to set that up. Compensate overtime, either with more pay or more vacation time. Improve assignment notification by giving out information earlier when you have it and using e-mail for employees who have been around long enough that you don't need to check in with them all the time. Try to remember that just because you're angry doesn't mean your employees deserve to be yelled at for errors that normally don't even get mentioned.



Showing 6 of 6 reviews
Reset Filters
RSS Feed </> Embed

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.