New York Times

  www.nytimes.com
Work in HR? Unlock Free Profile

New York Times Reviews

Updated August 16, 2014
Updated August 16, 2014
136 Reviews

3.2
136 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
(no image)
Mark Thompson
23 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Employee satisfaction is important, and a good work/life balance is provided (in 10 reviews)

  • Some genuinely smart people work here (in 12 reviews)


Cons
  • Expect to be responsible for your own career development (in 5 reviews)

  • Newspaper industry is struggling (in 5 reviews)

More Highlights

Employee Reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1.  

    Second time I've worked there-management-heavy in NY, resource poor in satellite offices.

    Former Employee - Account Manager  in  San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Account Manager in San Francisco, CA

    Pros

    Proud to be associated with such a beautiful product. Enjoyed traveling with the journalists. Not so much middle management who didn't really add that much value

    Cons

    Too much NY management coming into market all the imd and for the most part not adding value. Marketing teams produced programs that advertisers didn't want-didnt listen to the customer.

  2.  

    Safe but Stultifying Workplace

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Editor  in  New York, NY
    Current Employee - Editor in New York, NY

    Pros

    The level of talent of those around you is top-notch, whatever your department -- editorial, business, anything. And it's no small thing to work with people who are often risking their lives to report the news. While the benefits aren't great, full-time employees can work toward a pension, and there is a guild to protect labor interests. And though it varies depending on the job, most people have a favorable work-life balance.

    Cons

    The company makes no effort to invest in its employees' skills or careers, and provides no direction in terms of career advancement. In over four years working there, I have never received a performance review, or even had a conversation with my supervisor about my work and where I'd like to go at the company (except when I initiated the talk). It's almost as if management expects Times employees, being (mostly) reporters, to use their skills to figure all this out themselves. But that's no way to run a company, and as a result morale is horrible, while there is a sense -- fair or not -- that individual managers promote their friends and favorites over more deserving candidates.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Where to start? Develop a committed, top-grade career-development staff. Create protocols for performance reviews and incentives. Make it easier for workers to move among departments -- these are smart people who can get easily bored.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  3.  

    account executive

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Account Executive  in  New York, NY
    Former Employee - Account Executive in New York, NY

    Pros

    none.....environment of employee vs management....can't win environment.....encourages employees to look to other companies for work

    Cons

    no cooperation from management..borderline slave labor conditions....

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    treat employees as humans not whipping boys

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  4. We want your feedback – Are these company reviews helpful to you?  Yes | No
  5. 1 person found this helpful  

    Lacks organization

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Advertising Production Representative  in  New York, NY
    Current Employee - Advertising Production Representative in New York, NY

    Pros

    The company has an outstanding editorial department. The programs and affiliations are priceless. The perks are limited but the company has an excellent benefits package.

    Cons

    You report to several individuals, meaning you are not really sure who your boss is but you have a few of them. There are several tiers of management (managers, directors, executive, vice president, etc.). I've never seen an accurate organizational chart.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    The company should reduce the tiers of management or figure out a better way to organize each department. The company is fragmented and it shows in the level of customer service. The employees are staggered and lack basic knowledge of the products they produce.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  6. 1 person found this helpful  

    A stellar brand that every year erodes its prominence due to mediocre management

    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Three reasons why the brand still holds its value,: the content, the content, and the content.

    Cons

    Very poor management. We have the potential to be a leader in the business of journalism but fall behind due to lack of leadership, vision, strategy that works, and the ability to utilize to full advantage, its core resource--its employees. Low morale when you witness how staffers look at the NYT as a stepping stone to bigger and better not the destination it once was. Quality talent leave continuously. Limited opportunities to advance. Little or no genuine interest among managers to know the career aspirations of their staff.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    If you consistently go to the same people for ideas and cultivate the talent of only your chosen few, you will stagnate.

    Disapproves of CEO
  7.  

    Freelance copy writing, editing, rewrites for features

    Current Employee - Freelance Writer/Editor  in  New York, NY
    Current Employee - Freelance Writer/Editor in New York, NY

    Pros

    Work -at -home office, flexible schedule.

    Cons

    There are no cons for my work there.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    none

  8.  

    Great location & facilities but very bureaucratic culture

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Freelance Graphic Web Designer  in  New York, NY
    Former Employee - Freelance Graphic Web Designer in New York, NY

    Pros

    Pays well. Great location & facilities.

    Cons

    Very bureaucratic culture. Very political management.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9. 1 person found this helpful  

    Good Experience

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  New York, NY
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY

    Pros

    Company reputation
    Networking opportunities
    Training/education opportunities
    Flexible work schedule (depending on the department)

    Cons

    Power struggles between departments
    Finger pointing when something goes wrong
    Conflict in management styles within departments
    Only give feedback during annual reviews
    No clear roadmap for projects or prioritization everything is top priority

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Provide clear road map for future projects and show how they tie into important current projects. Give real prioritization guidance and timelines. Open real channels of communication, not just annual reviews. Give people a chance to improve performance. Don't treat high performers like the average or below average employees! Acknowledge great work when it's done.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10. 1 person found this helpful  

    Started promising, but opportunities are limited.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  New York, NY
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY

    Pros

    It's the Times. Your calls will always get answered. The world takes the brand very seriously.

    Cons

    Try to branch out and you get iced out. Management sees you as what you were hired as, and good luck trying to move up. There is little hope for internal promotion, and no formal path forward. Ask for more money and you will be treated like a criminal. They like to give you higher-level work and not pay you for it or formally promote you.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Take a look at the talent in your building. Your loyal employees are miserable. They want to learn new skills and advance but there's a cultural barrier that prevents it. Stop worrying about hiring 23-year-old white men right out of Harvard. You are hemorrhaging talent and it's at your own peril. Also, you need to be digital first, and the culture needs to reflect that. There's a caste system here that's stuck firmly in the past. There is a war for eyeballs and we are losing it. Digitize or die. That's more than a business plan - that's a mindset.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  11.  

    Fast-paced hard work, good training, incredibly talented employees, extremely detailed work process.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Photo Editor  in  New York, NY
    Former Employee - Photo Editor in New York, NY

    Pros

    The exceptional work that is produced by everyone offers a serious journalist many opportunities to excel. Generally, staff are helpful and always offer to answer questions. With overtime, a freelancer can usually make enough to live.

    Cons

    The expectation is often to cover desks with little training. There is no discussion of one's future work probabilities, leaving one unemployed for weeks without warning. Freelancers are not communicated with very often or very thoroughly, making the job nerve-wracking. Typically, one must freelance 2 to 3 years before getting hired as a permanent full-time employee. In the meantime, there are no benefits, constant concern about how much work one may be offered for the next month and they rarely schedule beyond 2 weeks to a month in advance.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Communicate better with freelancers, as the morale of your salaried employees depend on them being available to fill-in for vacations and emergencies. Give them feedback as to job performance and as to what they can expect for employment. Give them a reason to want to stay that goes beyond the excellent product that is created there.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

Worked for New York Times? Contribute to the Community!

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.