Pearson

  www.pearson.com
Work in HR? Unlock Free Profile

Pearson Reviews

Updated Jul 30, 2014
All Employees Current Employees Only

3.3 749 reviews

57% Approve of the CEO

(no image)

John Fallon

(146 ratings)

61% of employees recommend this company to a friend

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Usually a great work-life balance if you're in Production or Media (in 60 reviews)

  • Almost all of my colleagues with families work from home twice a week (in 30 reviews)


Cons
  • Lack of transparency between upper management & finance with the feet on the street (in 32 reviews)

  • IT development teams and operations tend to work long hours (in 25 reviews)

More Highlights
749 Employee Reviews
Relevance Date Rating
in
    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • No Opinion of CEO

    2 people found this helpful  

    Pearson Online Learning - Orlando

    Search Marketing Specialist (Former Employee) Orlando, FL

    ProsFair pay and benefits. Growing industry. Can wear jeans to work.

    ConsPearson recently acquired a small startup called Embanet Compass and has taken on the worst of both worlds. On one hand the company is highly bureaucratic and political. Some of the changes come from "on high" and make no sense to the employees on the ground. On the other, it's highly disorganized with a lot of empty positions yet to fill. The original directors on staff also have attitudes because they think they are Orlando's version of internet gurus. Don't let the jeans fool you, this is not a fun and happy place to work.

    Advice to Senior ManagementTraining should be telling new employees how great you are, how much you hate everyone else, and just being overall condescending. Also, the culture stinks, it's very high stress and reactionary. A quarterly happy-hour doesn't make for happy employees. Finally, if you offer things like telecommuting don't threaten to take it away every time something doesn't go your way.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • Disapproves of CEO

    3 people found this helpful  

    Company is trending in the wrong direction

    Director (Former Employee) Upper Saddle River, NJ

    ProsGood stability with employees that have been employed for a long period of time. The stability and allows you to manage work life balance. It is difficult to overlook the advantages of being able to overlook

    ConsLack of innovation; they do not have an objective way of managing or assessing talent with qualified professionals. Long tenured employee can fall into the routine trap and lack of motivation to remain current on innovative trends. Management seems to be the first to fall into this trap which leads to bad management and lack of company growth.

    Advice to Senior ManagementFocus on keeping good talent and rewarding change agents that can help to transition the business for emerging growth. Hire diverse talent to bring a different perspective and avoid 'group think'.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • Approves of CEO

    1 person found this helpful  

    Overall positive review of company, but some divisions left behind

    Editorial Manager (Former Employee) San Francisco, CA

    ProsGreat mission overall, to improve the lives of learners worldwide through innovative products; top-level management really does seem to believe that message; good opportunities for advancement if you're self-motivated and dedicated; really smart, great people on staff; salary better than usual in book publishing world

    ConsAlthough the long-term mission is a good one, I'm pessimistic about whether they'll actually achieve it; the change from a print publishing company to an all-format education company is a tough one, especially with so many things changing in the publishing world. My division is somewhat tangential to Pearson's main enterprises, so it just gathers dust, trying desperately to stay alive, reacting wildly to each new business trend, dragging its increasingly demoralized staff along with it.

    Advice to Senior ManagementTake account of all divisions in reorgs, make sure everyone is along for the ride.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

  1. We want your feedback – Are these company reviews helpful to you?  Yes | No
    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • No Opinion of CEO

    3 people found this helpful  

    Challenges around ever corner

    Anonymous Employee (Former Employee)

    ProsThe people are friendly and hard working. The benefits are adequate for a large company.

    ConsThe company is a 24/7 operation. The management team struggles. Politics are terrible. They reorg every 6 months.

    Advice to Senior ManagementThis company struggles as they over complicate solutions and hire too many people to manage customers, but not enough to actually do the technical work. Every contract ends up being customized so there is never a product that is off the shelf leading to long ramp up times.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities

     

    Good.

    Associate Software Quality Assurance Engineer (Current Employee) Centennial, CO

    Prosoverall good,gives plenty of time to employees to be on track,1/1's with manager do happen,and the outcomes are good too.

    Consheard people saying "we just do it that way,and have been doing that"...no out-of-box thinking...

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • No Opinion of CEO

    1 person found this helpful  

    Senior Project Manager

    Senior Project Manager (Current Employee) Old Tappan, NJ

    ProsGreat company, Great product, Great people

    ConsCulture is changing - not sure how it will look at the end of the tunnel

    Advice to Senior ManagementCommunicate and manage the change like a project manager

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • No Opinion of CEO

    1 person found this helpful  

    Massive global educational conglomerate in disruption, but self-aware, professional, and conscientious.

    Anonymous Employee (Current Employee) New York, NY

    ProsIts a British culture and staff treat each other, vendors, and customers with great respect and demeanor. As of late, first-class facilities in NYC. Excellent pay and benefits. Speaking your mind is encouraged and does not result in repercussions even if controversial.

    ConsInstitutional education is a very frustrating business to be in because of the limitations of what schools are budgeted and trained to purchase. This is a very siloed company due to numerous acquisitions, so work experiences may vary greatly - its impossible to 'see' the whole company.

    Advice to Senior ManagementScardino and Shore were on the right track - Pearson needs to continue to reinvent itself on an ongoing basis by each employee working to change the culture to modern standards. Fallon is right too - we need to service our revenue products to make sure we are funded. Its a challenge I don't envy, but there cannot be big gaps of time in which staff are not clearly communicated the message, direction we are going in today, and the status of their resources with which to do it. The tech side is fast-emerging, but is hamstrung by non-engineering management.

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • Approves of CEO

     

    It was very positive and a great place to work.

    Editorial Assistant (Current Employee) Boston, MA

    ProsI liked all my coworkers and it was a great first temp job.

    ConsIt was a temp job which ended a lot sooner than expected which left me very little time to find something else.

    Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • No Opinion of CEO

    1 person found this helpful  

    Great place to work. Not much turnover.

    Manager Procurement (Former Employee) Iowa City, IA

    ProsBenefits are the best. Salaries are ok, not great. But the benefits far outweigh the delta in salaries. Highly educated workforce.

    ConsSalaries are average but management usually get bonuses. Declined a lot since 2008. And bonuses sometimes disappear if company is not doing well.

    Advice to Senior ManagementRecent cuts in 2014 were not as transparent. Attrition caused many to leave. That environment does not encourage productivity.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

    • Culture & Values
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    • Disapproves of CEO

    6 people found this helpful  

    Promotion based on seniority not merit but if you just want a job it's got good benefits

    Production Project Manager (Former Employee) San Francisco, CA

    ProsUsually a great work-life balance if you're in Production or Media. Fantastic vacation and sick-leave policy (at least in California!). Doing really innovative work in the areas of education efficacy in media and course management.

    ConsBureaucracy at it's best. Entrenched middle management that are extremely fearful of change. Also, extremely slow moving. It is a huge organization, and very hard to get inefficient or out-dated procedures changed beyond sub-departments.

    A new workflow rolled out that was only half-baked. Training programs provided by the team in charge of the workflow have been unclear, and across departments and business units everyone has a different idea of what the new roles entail.

    Editors and Directors of Editorial Development in the Sciences show a seriously deficiency in the understanding of the paradigm shift from textbook publishers (linear, top-down, paper-based, bulk production products) to educational information publishers (non-linear, iterative, multi-format, customized products).

    No options for career growth.

    No connection between continuing value provided to the company and salary increases or meaningful rewards or recognition.

    I used to be really happy at Pearson. But I left because of everything mentioned above that snowballed over years that I was there, I left. And when people have asked me about working there I have said go for it, just know what you're getting into.

    Advice to Senior ManagementTo get, and more importantly maintain, top talent in the Bay Area you have to offer competitive, living wages. Maintaining top talent is tremendously important. You don't want to invest in training and then lose that person to Google, Facebook, or the next edu tech start-up. Which is what has been happening the last 3 years, and will continue to happen.

    Money's not the whole story. Enough with the top-down messaging. Work to empower your employees. Have clear incentives between quality of work produced and meaningful rewards. Hire managers that are brave enough to hire people that know more than them––and then listen to them. As David Ogilvy said "If each of us hires people who are smaller than we are, we shall become a company of dwarfs. But if each of us hires people who are bigger than we are, we shall become a company of giants."

    Provide quality training. You can't expect your technology uneducated and fearful staff to provide cutting-edge educational products.

    Don't be afraid to fire people who's bad attitude or poor quality of work are holding a team, company, or department, back.

    Be brave, imaginative, and decent. Live up to the stated Culture of Pearson.

    No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company

Worked for Pearson? Contribute to the Community!

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.