Pearson

www.pearson.com

Pearson Reviews

Updated January 28, 2015
Updated January 28, 2015
910 Reviews
3.1
910 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
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John Fallon
215 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Work-life balance can be upset during busy periods but I've experienced worse (in 71 reviews)

  • Telecommute opportunities so you can work from home 1 or 2 days a week (in 36 reviews)


Cons
  • Lack of transparency between upper management & finance with the feet on the street (in 38 reviews)

  • Nobody leaves (which is probably a "pro" for the company) so there's not much room for advancement (in 15 reviews)

More Highlights

Employee Reviews

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  1. 5 people found this helpful  

    Good benefits, people, not much else

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Pearson

    Pros

    Benefits package is decent. The people I worked with were generally good and wanted to do a good job.

    Good place to start a career, as it gives you a clear idea of what corporate America is like while you also build your resume to get your next job.

    Cons

    Employees are not valued by the people at the executive level.

    There's next to no clear communication to the employees "in the trenches." Every townhall meeting ends with employees wondering when the next round of layoffs will take place.

    Endless reorganizations with no clear purpose.

    The company, at least on the editorial, production, and design sides, relies heavily on contract positions. Employees who are on contracts never feel secure, so they are less inclined to devote themselves to the project and company. Furthermore, there's almost never any clear communication to the contract employees about when the contract ends or if there's a renewal in progress. There's a stated 2-year maximum for contracts, but then employees are sometimes axed before the stated duration of their contract or they are sometimes allowed to stay beyond 2 years. It's all very confusing.

    Increasing reliance on vendors for editorial and design work, which every editor and designer knows is a huge mistake. But the people making these decisions couldn't care less about quality, they just want an end product for salespeople to sell.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Do away with majority of contracts. Spend the money on qualified staff to produce a great product.

    Communicate more clearly to employees. No more corporate-speak babble in townhalls. Be realistic and clear about the future of employment so that employees can start looking for work. It's OK to be pointed and clear; employees are adults and can handle it.

    Rely less on vendors. Some do good work, but many do not.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 10 people found this helpful  

    Okay but Crazy Management

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Pearson full-time

    Pros

    People at your own level are great to work with, the cubicles were very spacious, etc.

    Cons

    Management can be really insensitive and not set an example themselves.

    HR doesn't do anything to solve problems.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Set an example if you expect something of employees!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  3. 4 people found this helpful  

    Pleasers

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Pearson full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Great benefits, some good work

    Cons

    Management, leadership and any authority are way too disconnected. People pleasers will like it here

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    You are not invincible

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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  5.  

    Software Developer Intern

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Software Development Intern in Chandler, AZ
    Former Employee - Software Development Intern in Chandler, AZ

    I worked at Pearson as an intern (more than a year)

    Pros

    Good place, good culture not too much stress in work. People are friendly and very helpful. Interned there for a year.

    Cons

    No happy hour, no team lunch and minimum wage compared to industry standard for a software developer. No free food nothing

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Please increase the minimum wage for interns and give them good perks

  6. 7 people found this helpful  

    Used to be much better

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA

    I have been working at Pearson full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Flexible schedule. Management is supportive and understanding. Under the former CEO company values and mission were at the core of everything the company did. Things have taken a massive down turn since the CEO left. Leadership lost a lot of knowledgeable people to competitors. Had massive layoffs. Leadership and management did not evaluate talent or attempt to keep the most talented staff, rather they just did away with jobs and lost great employees.

    Cons

    Changes are not filtered to employees. Resources have been taken away and not replaced. Has become hard to do that day-to-day operations of the job or even small tasks. Most people are unhappy with the current environment and it shows. People are being spread too thin. Decisions are based on saving money in the short term not long term.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Transparency is necessary during change.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  7. 11 people found this helpful  

    The inmates are running the asylum

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chandler, AZ
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Chandler, AZ

    I have been working at Pearson full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    It was a happy place with a lot of family camaraderie, 5 years ago.

    Cons

    They've lost their minds. Contrary to what they think the world is saying everyone is not happier working in big bull pens with their neighbor being 3 inches of elbow room away. The east cost offices people have no privacy at all, west coast is about to become that as well. There is NO room for advancement, unless you just show up to work and claim someone else's job or they make you take over the job because that person left. 3 year re-org only resulted in frustration and confusion.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Go back. Think about what you are doing. If keeping employees is a big deal, try to keep the few you have that are great. I've watched more talent leave in 3 years that I saw exist at other companies.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  8.  

    Great mission that is shared by majority of the employees

    Current Employee - Vice President of Product Management in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Vice President of Product Management in New York, NY

    I have been working at Pearson full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    flexible work schedule, freedom to be creative

    Cons

    in a state of transition with a lot of changes

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    culture

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
  9. 4 people found this helpful  

    They outsource continually

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Analyst in Upper Saddle River, NJ
    Former Employee - Analyst in Upper Saddle River, NJ

    I worked at Pearson full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    They are a publishing company but yet still do not have finical issues

    Cons

    Always moving locations and outsorcing employees

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10. 4 people found this helpful  

    A Company with a Great Mission but poor Internal Engagement

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Upper Saddle River, NJ
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Upper Saddle River, NJ

    I have been working at Pearson full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Flexible hours, great co-workers, a diverse work place, family friendly and very passionate people who love what they do and who we do it for.

    Cons

    Salaries, lack of raises, lack of engagement of employees during reorg, lack of opportunities

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Keep your employees in the loop, and if there is a lull in information, find other ways to stay connected to your teams

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  11. 31 people found this helpful  

    Claims moral high-ground on equality, but it's really just about payback.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Pearson full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    If you play your cards right, and are of the correct oppressed demographic, you will go far. The struggle to succeed at Pearson was like going to graduate school for an MBA in Hard Knocks while being paid a good salary and benefits. I'll be able to use the bruises and scars from this experience to do even better in future endeavors.

    The benefits are the best I've ever had. The salaries are great, also.

    Cons

    If you're a white male, plan for a long career in mediocre positions with lots of responsibility, no authority, no budget to accomplish the performance goals assigned to you by your manager, and an appalling lack of follow-through on the part of your manager as to said performance goals. The last time I was part of a decent and useful performance review was when I was the manager doing them with my direct reports.

    Also, Pearson has a tendency to reorganize itself nearly every year. This habit creates a lot of org chart chaos and keeps anything from truly being settled and operationalized.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    I'm 110% fine with men and women competing equally in the workplace. I enjoy working with women, sometimes even more than I enjoy working with men, because I find, in general, I get more intellectual enlightenment from the conversations I have with women. It's healthy to have both male and female perspectives in the room, working out solutions to daunting challenges. Each gender brings strengths to the table that help build a great business.

    However...

    Equality was supposed to be about...well...equality, not _payback_ or "grievance theater". I was let go after over a decade of trying to work my way up the ladder and being passed up for promotion after promotion. _Every_ time a promotion became available in my hierarchical vicinity, and I expressed an interest in and was quite qualified in obtaining it, it went to a woman. 75-80% of supervisors above me were women. Only about half of them were qualified per the job description (especially the more technical parts) or even knew what they were doing. The other half who were qualified made darn sure any men who began to get "uppity" were put in their place through passive-aggressive tactics, demotion, or firing. In saying this, I don't blame the individuals so much as a persistent negative culture particular to certain levels of management at Pearson that had been fostered by a certain former high-level executive. Everyone feared that person and all decisions made were made in fear of incurring that exec's wrath. Not a good way to build a positive working environment.

    Once, after a misunderstanding around project requirements, I was put into a room and literally interrogated by two female supervisors (the only thing missing was the bright light in my face). I was told how badly I had "damaged the reputation" of the department even though I had done nothing wrong. All documented evidence in my favor was rejected out-of-hand and I was not given the opportunity to include my accuser (also a woman) in the debate over what had gone wrong with the project. Her word was taken as gospel truth, without question, and my word was automatically discounted. After an hour of getting nowhere in my own, documented defense, I finally "broke" and I just let them believe whatever they wanted and took the consequence. The effort to defend myself was no longer worth it to me and I was done. It was a very, very toxic environment to work in.

    At Pearson, especially in the corporate office levels, there is rampant nepotism and fairly shady insider business dealings. There is also a fair amount of sexual hi-jinx and harassment...and not just instigated by the men. Pearson HR does tend to fire both the man and the woman whenever a claim of sexual harassment is levied by either of them. Not sure what purpose firing both of them serves, but that's not my circus.

    HR in particular, and the Diversity and Inclusion folks in general, needs to wake up and spend more time working on true egalitarianism, and stop playing petty identity politics games with peoples' careers.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

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