Pearson

www.pearson.com
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  1. 6 people found this helpful  

    Poor middle management

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Development Professional in Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Development Professional in Chicago, IL

    I worked at Pearson

    Pros

    flexible schedule, colleagues are good - like everyone stuck in a dysfunctional mess, tend to band together to survive

    Cons

    In it for the money, messy contracts, poor middle management

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 4 people found this helpful  

    Challenging

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Business Analyst
    Former Employee - Business Analyst

    I worked at Pearson

    Pros

    Benefits and Work/Life Balance

    Cons

    Work Environment, lack of clear direction from Sr. Management

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be more aware of what's happening at a grass roots level

    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  3. 14 people found this helpful  

    A Massive Ship Does Not Turn Easily, But Boy Does It Sink Fast

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Pearson full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    As a college student, it was probably unlikely that I would have found a position that paid as well or was as flexible during my time there. Benefits were pretty good, once you were eligible for them, and obviously, the textbook discount was helpful during college.

    Cons

    Oh, man. A company this size is tremendous at talking a great game and then not at all having that filter down. Our ranks were populated with people who had been there for, in some cases, decades, and seemed to be impervious to change, improvement, discipline, or being useful, simply because they had become so embedded that they were "too valuable" in the worst way possible. Internal job openings were much more difficult to apply to than they ought to have been. Our training and development systems changed at least 3 times in 5 years, and while there is something to be said for seeking out development, it often seemed as if the only way to get any feedback was through performance requiring disciplinary action. Negativity, backbiting and sniping were de rigueur parts of the workday - more so than any workplace gossip I've encountered with any other employer - and were allowed to fester until upper level management took notice, at times. "Cooperating" departments were often at odds with each other, ably assisted by the aforementioned negative culture, and organizational workflow and communication was dysfunctional at best. Pay raises weren't even commensurate with inflation, and the structure of hours that determined eligibility for benefits was backwards and counter-intuitive. The HR team members I dealt with were frequently ignorant about what seemed like would have been basic knowledge for their department - I often found it more useful to get in touch with certain members of completely-unrelated management to get information or to get things done. The internal website was a joke and frequently more of a hindrance than help - was it supposed to be a social network, an informational site, a site for training and collaboration, or a place to dump all of the above and wonder why it didn't work?

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    "Always Learning" means actually building upon the lessons learned and sought out. Your legacy products, processes, and personnel are eventually going to cause some big problems when the rotten interior falls apart, no matter how slick the presentation is. Recognize and mentor your talent, rather than letting them grow frustrated and unproductive, and stop rewarding mediocrity.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
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  5. 17 people found this helpful  

    Strangest corporate (especially North America higher ed) culture (if there even is one) that ever witnessed.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Pearson full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    Good benefits and 401K including employer contribution. However, never could understand how many people were bonused on the same sale especially the custom publishing ones. Often resorted to gimmickry (bundling book packages with useless junk) and mid-year price increases in order meet sales goals. Sales staffs were often not given their annual sales goals until mid-year or later. It was a big game with much number shuffling and smoke and mirrors.

    Cons

    Higher ed division mismanaged and only got worse in recent years. Company is trying to transition from print to digital but has no real idea how to achieve this. Uses terms like efficacy but no one really knows what that is supposed to mean much less explain it to the customer. Often announced poorly timed, Ill thought or impractical initiatives and programs that never really got off the ground. They were often quietly scrapped and employees were strongly advised not to bring them up in even casual conversation.

    Has been reorganizing for the past few years and no one really knows where this is headed (including many senior managers). Many, many employees are just keeping their heads down to not get noticed during the reorganization.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    For years some of the most ego driven and/or incompetent management structure ever observed especially in higher ed sales. Many people were promoted strictly because they knew how to brown nose their supervisors. Staffers would be amazed to witness these promotions despite the lack of any true talent. Many of those managers are still employed at Pearson trying to assimilate themselves into whatever this company figures out what it wants to be when it stops reorganizing. Overall morale has to improve if this company is truly going to be successful again.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  6. 16 people found this helpful  

    Constant reorganization is leaving employees dizzy.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Pearson full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Fair benefits and compensation. Flexible hours and telecommuting are allowed for some roles with management approval.

    Cons

    Management rolled out an extensive reorganization to move to a matrix organization last year. The transition has not been managed well and it has created a culture where employees don't feel empowered nor a sense of ownership over projects. There are so many levels of approval for simple decisions that it stalls innovation and there is not a sense of urgency to address issues. Revenue has suffered and employees are leaving or even worse... they, "quit and stay" with the hopes that this current model will change with the next reorganization. New leaders are appointed every couple of months and employees who are dizzy from the changes are sitting around waiting for clear leadership and direction.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Simply approval processes to enable the organization to respond more quickly to customer needs. Old hierarchy systems needs to be dismantled before a matrix organizational structure can be effective. Otherwise, you have just added more levels of approval without a clear leader and owner who is accountable for the final decision.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  7. 9 people found this helpful  

    Not what it used to be

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Old Tappan, NJ
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Old Tappan, NJ

    I worked at Pearson

    Pros

    Very good benefits. This is probably the only thing I miss about Pearson since I left. The work life balance (ability to work from home) is okay, not as good as it used to be.

    Cons

    Many of the good, hard working people who were there for any length of time were unceremoniously jettisoned over the last year or so. Outsourcing has robbed IT of a lot of future thinking talent, and many who were not replaced by offshore employees willingly left Pearson over the last year. Many who were left behind have become nine-to-fivers, as extra effort is not rewarded (the year end review process is unbelievably demotivating - for years now, upper management will overrule the individual line manager's employee rating so smaller bonuses will be paid out). The frugality doesn't end there - most employees will have difficulty getting funds approved for travel, training, industry conferences, etc. Bonuses used to be very good, but no more. There is an incredible amount of red tape and paperwork involved in getting project work done - good ideas rarely come to fruition (unless it comes from the top down). Creativity and ingenuity are not rewarded. The office culture is more or less nonexistent, which is a shame, because it used to be very strong.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  8. 1 person found this helpful  

    Consult with C-Suite of Career Colleges for digital learning solutions.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Pearson

    Pros

    Excellent company. Leadership seems to care.

    Cons

    They are a technical company that operates with an old publishing paradigm. This is adversly affecting sales commissions.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Adjust sales compensation to reflect integration timelines.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
  9. 4 people found this helpful  

    Good place to learn people skills

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX

    I worked at Pearson full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Colleagues at my level were wonderful, hard-working, smart people.
    Great place to learn strategies for dealing with difficult people (during my tenure, one of the main clients).

    Cons

    "Leadership" does not care about any kind of work/life balance--average work week was 70 hrs/wk.
    The customer is always right...ALWAYS right.
    Hard work not recognized and fairly compensated.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10. 6 people found this helpful  

    Heading down the wrong path

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Director, IT
    Former Employee - Director, IT

    I worked at Pearson

    Pros

    Flexible work schedule and good work-life balance.
    Leverage latest technologies as company evolves from print to digital age.

    Cons

    Latest re-structure effort is a mess.
    Little upper management communicating down the lines, employees left in the dark, and bewildered. Lost too many talented folks on the Tech Ops side. With the lack of guidance coming from upper management, the exodus of talent and their willingness to run business units into the ground, Pearson is heading down a slippery slope.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop the re-org's and invest in your home grown talent.
    Listen to the folks that have built the business units that you have acquired.
    The world does not evolve around England!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  11. 8 people found this helpful  

    Director

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Director in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Director in New York, NY

    I worked at Pearson full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Large company with lots of opportunity to learn from different types of professionals. Well funded and great name to drop when you need to accomplish something.

    Cons

    They create growth by buying technology and products, but they don't integrate the companies that bring them, but expect the technology to fall into their cookie cutter platforms. Problem is those platforms are flawed and added to the business reason they needed to go outside for growth.

    You loose great people that way, and the ones who wanted to stay and make positive change quickly loose motivation due to politics.

    Eventually you're let go for lack of motivation or being on the wrong side of a political line.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    When you buy a company put some effort into figuring out what it's real value is - the people who created it.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

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