Pew Charitable Trusts Reviews

Updated July 2, 2015
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104 Employee Reviews

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  1. Helpful (4)

    Disappointing.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Manager in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Manager in Washington, DC

    I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Lots of resources. Millions of dollars devoted to single projects. Ability to retain great talent.

    Cons

    Too much organizational re-structuring. Elimination of key segments of the organization without any real explanation.

    Advice to Management

    Start over.


  2. Helpful (1)

    Out of Date

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC

    I have been working at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Like many other thoughts about the organization: the health benefits and days off are great; you work with smart, talented people; and when you go home at the end of the day, you go home. I would recommend this organization to someone who is solely looking for a paycheck, nothing more.

    Cons

    It is a culture of fear in which people are scared to do or try anything. Decisions are made at the top unaware of how work gets done or who is doing the work. There is little concern for the employee or morale of the organization and employees are seen as strictly headcount rather than real staff. It is impossible to get recognized for the work you do and after two years at the organization, your income is far less than what your peers in other organizations are making.

    Advice to Management

    It's the people that make an organization not the other way around.


  3. Helpful (5)

    Make it work

    Current Employee - Officer in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Officer in Washington, DC

    I have been working at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    very smart people, interesting topics, make it work for you, good work-life balance

    Cons

    challenging structure, short project timelines,


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  5. Helpful (5)

    Work hard, don't get recognized with any type of pay increase or career advancement

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous
    Current Employee - Anonymous

    I have been working at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Benefits- full employee medical and vision paid by company. Family medical may also be free after one year of employment.

    Cons

    If you're not caucasian, then this is NOT the place for you. All the caucasian employees will walk by you staring at the wall, ceiling, or floor just because they don't want to say hi to a non-caucasian employee.

    Advice to Management

    Provide chances for career advancement and don't have the stupid 2 year rule for any chance of advancement. For outsiders looking to join Pew, the only way you can move to a higher lever position is after working in your current position for 2 years. It cab take you up to 6 or 7 years to become some type of manager. Definitely not worth it.


  6. Helpful (7)

    Check your ethics at the door -- Worst place to work

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Some people are really nice and want to do well. Can make some good connections if your management allows you access. Reputation of organization.

    Cons

    1. Reputation far outweighs the reality of the work. Most programmatic work is outsourced. When compared to the for-profit world, staff is lacking in knowledge, skills and ability. 2. Program management "bullies" the rest of the organization. Managers in program areas cannot manage and tend to blame others for their shortcomings. 3. Decisionmaking centered at the top. Top managers are afraid to make decisions or to take a risk. Often, in order to make sure that a manager or associate cannot be blamed for a mistake/error, managers and associates make ethically questionable decisions and statements.

    Advice to Management

    Need to decentralize the power and allow staff to be empowered to make decisions. Managers need autonomy to lead and direct their departments without fear of retribution if need to change course.


  7. Helpful (9)

    Generally a positive experience working on interesting and meaningful issues.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts

    Pros

    Good work-life balance, above-average compensation for the nonprofit world with excellent benefits, and the employees are of a very high caliber. Pew produces high quality and generally well-respected work. It also has good brand recognition.

    Cons

    Little room for advancement and promotions. The well-known secret is that it is often easier to get promoted by leaving and coming back to the organization than by staying, working hard, and proving your loyalty. There are also many bureaucratic hurdles to jump through and it is a very hierarchical organization.


  8. Helpful (6)

    Regret taking the job

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Officer in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Officer in Washington, DC

    I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    1. A small handful of people in the organization are great at their jobs and passionate about the work. 2. The prestige of the organization gives you access to federal and state policymakers, and other key organizations.

    Cons

    1. The pay is not competitive and it's nearly impossible to get a real raise. Annual salary adjustments are less than the standard of living increase.
    2. It's nearly impossible to get a promotion. Good staff are better off leaving than to stay.
    3. The benefits are OK--but they are cutting them.

    Advice to Management

    Value your employees, without just lip service.


  9. Helpful (4)

    Great place to start, inequalities are stark, no room for advancement (former employee)

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    Pew offers their name, great benefits and really smart people. For someone who is starting a career and intends to stay in non-profit sector (or even venture out), or even wants to move to grants management, Pew will give you a solid understanding of what it takes to successfully run this type of business. They have a lot of systems and processes in place which you may or may not find in other places. They are constantly overhauling these and many of the SoPs may not make sense. Until you get to a place that has ZERO systems and processes, an experience like this may not mean much. But if you do, it sure will give you a lot of knowledge of how to structure things.

    They will also teach you what it means to be a "brand ambassador" of an organization. Some people may call it "pew brainwashing" but I believe it is a good skill set to understand how to best represent and organization, and Pew being a "family organization" really drives this home.

    Cons

    If you are a recent (under grad) college grad and begin trying to "climb the ladder" at Pew as an AA, don't expect to get very far. It is very difficult to switch from administrative to program staff in this organization which offers little to no career advancement for young people, which is really a shame.
    Additionally, there are major gender gaps in pay, including from the very beginning, starting as an AA. During my time there, I found out that someone who was hired, also fresh out of undergrad, who was a "known slacker" and went to a less reputable college than myself, was making $4K more a year than myself, and was male. That was extremely disheartening. And as I found out, it continued up the chain.

    They also claim to support training and educational opportunities but I have never known anyone who worked here that managed to actually utilize those benefits, because everyone works very hard and is very busy.

    Advice to Management

    Consider creating better career tracks for recent graduates who demonstrate promise, employee cultivation and retention could go a long way to improving your brand.

    And examine your pay policies, it's pathetic that a company whose motto is "speak truth to power" AND has a female CEO, would have such unbalanced compensation.


  10. Helpful (10)

    Wasted potential

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (More than 5 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Salary, benefits; smart and capable colleagues; work mission; Pew reputation garners attention and respect, making it easier to meet goals; very good programmatic resources.

    Cons

    Culture of mistrust; staff are seen as replaceable; no opportunities for advancement; constant restructuring; the more senior the staff, the more miserable and self-interested they are; programs are constantly up for renewal, leaving a feeling of poor job security; unending bureaucracy; poor reputation among partner groups; no work schedule flexibility and no telecommuting allowed.

    Advice to Management

    Commit to projects and people. Trust more, restructure less. Pew hires the best of the best; staff can do the job if you let them. Enter the 21st century re: flexible work options.


  11. Helpful (8)

    Great people, great work

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Associate in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Senior Associate in Washington, DC

    I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (More than 3 years)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Terrific, smart, wonderful colleagues, as others have noted. Interesting work, beautiful work space. The issues are compelling, particularly if you are interested in environmental issues. Great staff parties twice a year and amazing benefits. Managers make it easy to leave at 5:30, which is unusual in DC.

    Cons

    Younger staff tend to complain - a lot

    Advice to Management

    Given the size and complexity of the organization, better training for junior staff might be helpful.



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