PitchBook Reviews

Updated June 16, 2015
46 reviews filtered by
  • Any Location
  • Any Job Title
  • Full-time
  • Part-time
Employment Status

Reset
3.4
Rating Trends
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
PitchBook Founder & CEO John Gabbert
John Gabbert
39 Ratings

46 Employee Reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1. Helpful (1)

    Research Analyst

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA

    I have been working at PitchBook full-time

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Great career opportunity to get your foot in the door.

    Cons

    None, the company is a great place to work.

    Advice to Management

    Continue to keep doing what you are doing


  2. Helpful (10)

    Relationship status: It's complicated

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Marketing Associate in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Marketing Associate in Seattle, WA

    I worked at PitchBook

    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    1. If you want to gain exposure to every aspect of the private capital markets, work at PitchBook. 2. If you want to build a career in SaaS/B2B sales, work at PitchBook. 3. If you want to test your personal and professional limits, work at PitchBook. 4. If you want to become become proficient in a highly useful financial software product, work at PitchBook. 5. If you want amazing new hire and ongoing training, work at PitchBook.

    Cons

    There are truths about PitchBook, and there are opinions about PitchBook. Here are the truths: 1. PitchBook pays significantly lower than many companies in Seattle, especially compared to tech companies. This causes problems for both the acquisition and retention of talent. 2. PitchBook has a lot of organizational dysfunction related to under-developed leadership. By default, the majority of the men in leadership positions achieved those roles as a result of having seniority in a young and rapidly growing company, and not because they are equipped to manage or lead their teams. 3. There are no women in senior leadership roles. As a tech company that operates in the capital markets universe, women are especially scarce and they are not represented among decision makers; a lot of people call it "bro culture," but honestly, PitchBook is not the only place this is a problem, so I don't know whether it is even worth highlighting as part of the PitchBook narrative. Misogyny and male privilege are as equal a part of PitchBook's culture as they are at many other companies. That said, PitchBook is not paving the way for gender equality. 4. PitchBook does not have an executive team, and as a result, the CEO is spread too thin, has his hand in too many projects, and struggles to relinquish control of the daily functions of the company. This really only makes an impact if you're on a team without a solid manager or advocate. 5. There is a certain *type* of person that succeeds at PitchBook. You must be politically savvy, diplomatic, and willing to assimilate. Revolutionary thinkers and people who don't like to party have historically not fit in. If you decide to work at PitchBook, be mindful of how you articulate your ideas and to whom, or it could backfire. Here are my opinions and my experiences: I joined PitchBook in an inside sales role, and I was not successful for a number of personal reasons -- I'm highly analytical, I lacked competitiveness, and I craved more variety in my daily routine. However, I did demonstrate some value in my understanding of PitchBook's industry and product, so I was eventually moved to a different role within the company -- a marketing position -- even though I had never once hit my sales goals. I thought that this new role would be a great fit; I got to collaborate and work on creative projects that contributed to larger, company-wide goals. However, at the time the marketing team lacked a manager and I began to see how hard it was to access guidance, support, feedback, and opportunity. Morale was gravely low. I passionately advocated for change, diagnosed problems and proposed solutions, but it fell on deaf ears. I became frustrated. My delivery became increasingly hostile, both because I felt unheard, and because I encountered very real harassment from a number of men in leadership positions, from comments about my appearance and their apparently inverse relationship with my perceived capabilities, to intentionally created roadblocks in my work product, to actual physical interactions that made me uncomfortable. I don't think this is a common experience, but these experiences absolutely influenced my ability to remain calm and professional in my interactions with key influencers within the company. I lost it and eventually threw myself under the bus, positioning myself as a whistle-blower and purveyor of bad attitudes. So, what do I think about PitchBook? My experience was astronomically bad when it comes to HR issues, but I gained invaluable wisdom and knowledge that I've since applied to my current professional role and aspirations. Because of PitchBook, I know what I want my career to look like 10 years from now, and it's a direction I didn't even know existed at the time I finished college and went on to graduate school. I also learned major lessons in how to better conduct myself when I face challenges and conflicts with coworkers and managers; I learned to "manage up" for the first time ever. Do I regret working there? Definitely not. Do I think it's a healthy place to work? For many people, probably not, but it can be rewarding if you view the experience through the lens of growing pains. It sucks, but you're better for having gone through it. I don't know whether I would recommend working at PitchBook. It was a complex experience for me, as it is for many people, but if I met someone who was applying there, I would encourage them to ask themselves what they value in job opportunities, what they will and will not accept or compromise, and whether a company's values need to align with their own in order to find meaning in a work experience. At the end of the day PitchBook decided that I was not a good fit for it, not the other way around; although, I realize now that PitchBook did me many favors, by teaching me important lessons and by making the decision for me that I should no longer work there. Onward and upward.

    Advice to Management

    1. Seriously consider revising compensation and benefits. The company is missing out on, or losing existing talent because of more competitive offers. 2. Expand the executive team. I currently work at a different SaaS company across town that also launched its product in 2009, has roughly the same employee count, and similar revenue numbers, but with a 12 person executive team (including multiple C-level and director level positions, and the two founders, not to mention a 6 person legal team and an 8 person HR team to assist with major decisions). Make sure to promote or hire deserving executives. PitchBook needs actual leadership. Come up with a cocktail of current rockstars and new ninjas from the outside that actually works. 3. Get an HR team. The person who currently fills this role is kind and competent, but a company of PitchBook's size needs a larger, more experienced team of professionals to both support employees and protect the company from a number of risks and liabilities. 4. Be kind. Actively pursue your own growth and development, as well as management and communication skills. Empathy is the missing piece and it is evident in nearly every arena, from compensation, to the lack of formal review or feedback processes, and embracing employees who are different from the ideal candidate pulled from the PitchBook catalogue. 5. Be a company of integrity. Don't cut corners with ethically questionable and exploitative business practices. In a changing economy, the benefit of outsourcing and crowd sourcing will be short lived. 6. Start innovating again instead of just trying to be the answer to whatever your competitors are doing. PitchBook blazed trails for years, but has fallen behind because innovators are silenced and ridiculed. That is a cultural and strategic problem, not a problem with the product itself or the people who make it. 7. Listen.


  3. Helpful (6)

    Embrace and Drive Change

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at PitchBook full-time (Less than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    -Cool product, cool industry -Opportunity to work with some really brilliant, fun people -Decent location on the peer -Enough ambiguity to keep you entertained -Decent growth path for sales and research YOU SHOULD WORK HERE IF: -You like the work hard/party hard environment -You don't intend on staying at any one company much longer than 1-2 years -You enjoy helping to build a company -You are good at identifying inefficiencies/problems and are also willing to find/carry out solutions -You are willing to work with difficult leadership

    Cons

    Senior management that shouldn't be senior. Many of those in senior positions are highly inexperienced, and have been forced to live within the paradigm of JG-style management. Because of that, their own growth is massively stunted, along w/ their ability to effectively manage and mentor employees. A CEO who just can't let go long enough to let people do their jobs. Everyone lives in constant fear of the JG control freakout in which he zeros in on one specific department, makes everyone's lives a living hell and then at some point, is (miraculously) distracted long enough by a different department to move on. No established growth path for people that come in with experience. So, PitchBook has gotten smarter and aren't ONLY hiring people right out of undergrad (though it still happens). But because of this, they don't really know how to accommodate the career growth needs of these mid-level professionals, who are some of the more competent employees. A sad benefit package and compensation compared to other companies: Others have touched on the pay aspect so I'll talk about benefits. PitchBook pretty much does the minimum required. You get stock options that vest long after you will inevitably leave the company (or the company is bought out). A 401k "match" that isn't much of a match. Three weeks vacation with no sick leave. You have the option to pay $60/month for CrossFit, if thats you're thing (if not, you're SOL). They have an education reimbursement form but I've never actually heard of anyone being reimbursed, unless your in sales it's unlikely you're going to be sent to any industry events, there's no flexible working environment, an embarrassing two weeks paid maternity leave...I can keep going here. Oh, but the culture. They will try to sell you on the culture. Yes, the one time a year that we happen to go to a Mariners game together is fun, if you consider fun to include massive amounts of drinking starting at about 9 am. The holiday party is also more or less a frat party (Last year there were certain members of management licking people on the face and peeing in the sink). Sometimes there are gatherings, sometimes there's food and beer there. There's a coffee machine and a soda fridge. If that's all you need for perks, then come on down to PitchBook. If you want more, then I'd look elsewhere.

    Advice to Management

    #1: Care more about the people that work for you. PitchBook is full of employees that care deeply about the industry, the product, the clients, and the company. Unfortunately, many of them end up leaving because they don't feel like the company cares for them as much as they care for the company. These people are invaluable. They are your key to figuring out ways to solve so many of the the problems outlined in ALL of these reviews. Find them, make sure they feel valued, use them to help improve the company. #2 Please, raise another round and use it to: -Hire qualified middle and senior management (and pay them appropriately) along with a functioning, legitimate HR presence -Provide better benefits and pay for your employees (You should be aware that the cost of living in Seattle has risen significantly, as well as the average starting salary). -Get an in-house dev team -Hire a consultant group to help you set much needed operational processes (ie review/career paths for your employees) #3 If raising another round really isn't going to happen, then at least be explicitly clear about your intentions with the company. I know JG has a large stake in the company (per an article found on PE Hub). Some chance he's only going to allow the company grow w/ minimal resources before he cashes out. #4 JG, if the above isn't true please read up on effective leadership as a founder/CEO. We all get why things the way they are. it's your company. But things could be so, so much better for you, your employees, your company and your clients. Embrace and drive change, right?


  4. Is this helpful? The community relies on everyone sharing – Add Anonymous Review


  5. solid if your on the right team

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at PitchBook

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    great people, fun enviornment, growing fast

    Cons

    some departments teams are clearly not prioritized


  6. Research Associate

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at PitchBook

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Fun work environment, great employees

    Cons

    Work can be repetitive and dry

    Advice to Management

    None


  7. fantastic growth

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA

    I have been working at PitchBook full-time (Less than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    Pros

    growth, culture, opportunity, business, knowledge

    Cons

    Not expecting any cons, excited


  8. Helpful (5)

    dead end company and job, weigh your options

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Account Manager in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Account Manager in New York, NY

    I have been working at PitchBook full-time (Less than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    if you like to drink they go out a lot but more often than not it's on your dime not the company's you can dress as scrubby as you want People wear shorts, yes shorts, to work nice people that work there (most of them are working scared though)

    Cons

    you have to pay for a % (15%) of your benefits. it's very sneaky how they do it No equity, it's not even discussed no career growth the CEO is very very frugal lots of screen time no cohesion across departments management is very shaky tons of turnover they expect to pay AM's in NYC 50k, with the promise to crush commissions (2%) of whatever the sale is dont think for a second that this could be a stepping stone to working for a pE/VC firm

    Advice to Management

    pay your employees


  9. Helpful (2)

    It is all about the people

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Executive Assistant in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Executive Assistant in Seattle, WA

    I worked at PitchBook full-time (More than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    PitchBook is great because the people are great. Nearly everyone on every team is accommodating, sharp and dedicated to the company. Most of the team is young and exceptionally talented which translates to a constantly engaging work environment. If you are looking for a company to launch your career, gain invaluable experience, work with an amazing team and be professionally challenged, PitchBook is it. Three important things to know when considering a role at PitchBook: 1. Your colleagues will be for you. PitchBook, across all teams, is hugely collaborative and everyone is willing to help, teach and challenge each other. 2. Your work will make a difference. Admittedly, some roles are more mundane than others but because the company continues to grow rapidly, there is always something to do. Many teams have established career paths and for most employees, the opportunity is what you make it. One of my favorite PB stories is of a colleague who in 3 years time, created a new department and continues to grow a team under her. 3. The culture cannot be beat. Although the company culture continues to evolve, you can still count on having fun at work. The management team has put in a ton of effort into keeping their teams connected and engaged. You can plan on regular company events, impromptu gatherings and team happy hours.

    Cons

    PitchBook continues to grow rapidly and it is no surprise that one of the biggest challenges is scaling. The company growth goals are aggressive and at times this means there is too much to do without adequate support. I fully believe that as the management team grows and key positions are filled, issues like communication, professional development and internal resources will be addressed.

    Advice to Management

    Y'all are awesome and make working at PitchBook a positive experience. Keep doing what you are doing and leading well.


  10. Helpful (11)

    Weigh Your Options First

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Manager in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - Manager in Seattle, WA

    I worked at PitchBook full-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    • Super low pay - can easily get more money other places. Better places to start your career • Boring roles - very focused positions that don't allow you to see more of the business • No stocks options - weird as haven't seen many companies these days that don't offer options • Very few career progression options - pretty limited career growth • Disappointing CEO - the guy doesn't get it, has a big ego, pushes out a lot of senior leaders

    Cons

    • Fun people - good folks overall • Great office location - doesn't beat working by the water • Some neat events • Cool product - although starting to fall behind competitors

    Advice to Management

    Provide stock options to all employees, check ego at the door, and train managers on leadership.


  11. Helpful (3)

    A great place to launch your career.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - User Experience Designer in Seattle, WA
    Former Employee - User Experience Designer in Seattle, WA

    I worked at PitchBook full-time (More than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    I was on comparatively smaller team (Product), so my experience is not necessarily indicative of the majority of roles within PitchBook (i.e. sales, research, account management, etc.), but I feel confident about the following: PitchBook is a great place for young professionals. Working here will give you exposure to just about every side of the SaaS B2B industry. People get promoted quickly and fairly, and more recently they’ve put in place established career paths for Sales, Research and Account Management. Furthermore, PitchBook gives employees ample opportunity to move departments according to their interests. All of this amounts to being an incredibly useful experience for people who are fresh in their career and want exposure to a variety job functions. It’s like boot camp for your career; you’re going to learn a ton and feel very well equipped on your path. PitchBook is what you make it––literally. Along with the internal mobility, employees have the opportunity to create their own roles. There were numerous instances of employees encountering roadblocks/suboptimal processes, proposing solutions and essentially getting hired to execute on that proposal. PitchBook has great people. Everyone is very nice and open; PitchBook has a very team-oriented and collegially competitive atmosphere. People work very hard, but you’ll also have many happy hours and company/team events. Some of the smartest and most capable people I know I met at PitchBook, and I’m confident that it’s a breeding ground for strong future talent. As a designer, I appreciated the opportunity to work on an extremely complex platform. From a user interface and visual design perspective, my time at PitchBook provided many opportunities for tackling design challenges such as organizing an immense amount of data, creating a usable interface and navigational structure, designing useful rather than "just pretty" data visualizations, and the constant tug of war between what functionality to show vs. what to hide (discoverability). As a disclaimer, everyone should know that succeeding at PitchBook requires having an interest in learning about the Private Equity, Venture Capital and M&A space. PitchBook is an extremely sophisticated product in an extremely complex niche. It's impossible to do your job well without understanding the unique needs of this space and the people that operate within it. Luckily, PitchBook has one of the finest employee training/knowledge development programs I've ever encountered. It's a rarity to find such a well-developed program in a tech company of its size/age.

    Cons

    PitchBook is one of the fastest growing companies in Seattle, and it has even shown up on similar national rankings. As such, it’s no surprise that it’s biggest challenge is one of scale. A process/unit of infrastructure that works for a startup likely does not work for a globally distributed company. Practically speaking, this means that communication between departments/teams can be difficult. Furthermore, a more robust middle-management structure is needed to mitigate these challenges and better distribute decision making authority throughout the company. Better understanding who can make decisions and empowering more middle and lower-level employees to do so still remains a challenge. From a design perspective, I think PitchBook needs to improve in the areas of user data gathering and testing both during and after product launches, and making data-driven decisions in general. I know senior management is aware of this need for improvement and at least have the intent of addressing it moving forward.

    Advice to Management

    I know for a fact that executive management is aware of the issues I detailed above and is trying to improve upon them. Changing core processes is difficult and not always quick, but I’m confident that senior management is committed to the task.



Showing 46 of 50 reviews
Reset Filters
RSS Feed </> Embed

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.