Public Outreach

  www.publicoutreachrecruitment.com
  www.publicoutreachrecruitment.com

Public Outreach Reviews

Updated October 30, 2014
Updated October 30, 2014
42 Reviews
3.4
42 Reviews
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John Finlay
16 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    Public Outreach

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Fundraising Representative in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Fundraising Representative in Boston, MA

    I worked at Public Outreach part-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Great to meet new people, development of intercommunication skills

    Cons

    Unpredictable days, quick turn around

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    -

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    Extremely Unprofessional Environment

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Fulfillment Coordinator in Seattle, WA
    Current Employee - Fulfillment Coordinator in Seattle, WA

    I have been working at Public Outreach full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    The office culture was very organic--lots of fun sometimes, but lines are often blurred between manager and friend. Overall I enjoyed my coworkers.

    Cons

    The compensation is very poor. In my interview we discussed having a typical 9-5 schedule, which actually turned out to be 10:30-7 (or 8...or 9...). Policies are constantly changing and the fundraisers are both unethical and unprofessional, which makes the job very difficult for those of us who have to represent our fundraisers when on the phone with donors.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    More transparency! Spend less money on travel for fundraisers and senior leadership to fly all over the country and more money compensating your employees that are in the office until 9:00pm.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  3.  

    DON'T BOTHER

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Professional Fundraiser in Oakland, CA
    Former Employee - Professional Fundraiser in Oakland, CA

    I worked at Public Outreach full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    no Pros for this job unless your a snotty teenager looking to crap on everyone else.

    Cons

    Public outreach is a sales job scam.
    As a Former employee of Oakland Ca Public outreach office I can certainly tell you when they say this is not a commission based job so that you won't have pressure in trying to meet quota to get paid ITS A LIE. Just because they say its hourly doesn't mean anything. you still have to meet a quota or you just might as well not even come back to work.
    This is especially bull for this type of job because it depends all on people signing up just for you to keep your job.
    And since people are becoming so anti social now a days, I'm going to get a lawn chair and some popcorn and watch this company falls to pieces while i laugh my socks off.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    if you want to pressure your employees with quotas then make this a sales commission job like it's suppose to be.
    Other wise your going to continue to have a high turn over rate and eventually your going to run out of business from firing so many potentially good quality employees.
    GOOD LUCK

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
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  5.  

    Senior management not trained in conflict resoloution

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Public Outreach full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    -flexible work days
    -nice coworkers
    -easy to get hired

    Cons

    -untrained leaders
    - strong cap on growth within the company

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Do not just promote based on numbers but also quality or managerial and leadership abilities.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  6. 2 people found this helpful  

    Bad experience. Beware!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Fundraiser
    Former Employee - Fundraiser

    I worked at Public Outreach full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Friendly, supportive staff and co-workers, generally positive environment. Good pay for entry level
    position, but not an easy job. They played group bonding games during breaks which everyone seemed to enjoy because they already knew each other, but personally, I was embarrassed because they were playing loud games in public places where people were walking by and staring like we were children.

    Cons

    They said extensive training would be provided, but it was NOT. After a long presentation about the charity's background, they put a lot of pressure and emphasis on quotas and meeting number requirements. It was very much like a sales job. Basically, if you don't make the quota, they can fire you. They previously stated that they don't do commission because they don't want to pressure employees, but they omitted the quota requirement until after I was hired. Then they handed us a script, told us to memorize it verbatim literally overnight, and dropped us off in some neighborhood to knock on doors alone. I had no relevant experience or training at that point.

    There were MANY discrepancies between the job ad/interview and actual employment. I was told during the interview that we would fundraise in teams or pairs and very rarely have to do it alone. On the first day, they told me that everyone primarily fundraises alone. Keep in mind that they fundraise after dark so that's
    definitely a safety issue/concern, especially for female employees. Again, you have to knock on doors alone (very dangerous at night)!

    Many of the methods I witnessed from long-time fundraisers made me uncomfortable. They were pushy, aggressive, and bothersome. They wouldn't leave when asked to, and wouldn't take "no" for an answer. They used questionable tactics such as guilt and flattery to persuade people to donate.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    You need to be upfront and honest about what the job actually requires, from the beginning. Where was the extensive, great training I was promised? Try giving employees the tools and tips to succeed instead of pressuring them into getting enough sponsors and scaring them with termination. They act like they're so compassionate because they represent a charity, but it's really just about money.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Public Outreach Response

    Aug 6, 2014National Recruitment Manager POUSA

    It's unfortunate that your experience of talking to the locals in the area on a great non-profit was not a great one. Often times getting the opportunity to talk to someone at their home is a great ... More

  7. 3 people found this helpful  

    Numbers-driven: not for everyone.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Fundraising Representative in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Fundraising Representative in New York, NY

    I worked at Public Outreach full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    *Working on behalf of companies with great causes of humanitarian benefit! :D
    *Above-average competitive pay
    *Rapid advancement and lots of opportunities to grow within the company
    *Very flexible schedule
    *Great benefits

    Cons

    *All day outside - rain, sun, heavy snow, blistering cold, scorching heat - It doesn't matter what weather it is, you have to be there.

    *It feels more like sales than fundraising, despite Management assuring otherwise. The same manipulative techniques used in sales are disguised in different names and used to get people's information to get them involved in something they don't really want to be a part of.

    *Another point on the "sales" vibe - it's all about *immediate* numbers. Management talks occasionally about "quality", but they don't care about how many people you turn into long-term, "quality" donors if those people elect to become involved via phone call instead on the streets. But the truth is, nine times out of ten, the more mature, genuinely interested and financially responsible potential donors will do this, because they are willing to make a long-term investment, want to make sure that the organization whom they invest with truly guarantees what they promise, and they know better than to give out sensitive financial information on the sidewalk - regardless of how many cops are on the corner.

    *Double standard for newbies and "staff". The pressure is put on newbies to make a quota in a specific amount of time (and they'll claim it's not a quote but a "recommended amount") while (not all, but a lot of) the "staff" stands around and gossips, zones out, secures less donors and gets paid a lot more. It doesn't matter that you're punctual and diligent, worked ten times harder, spoke to more people for the day, scheduled more phone follow-ups with quality people, or actually CARE about the cause you're working for. If at the end of the stipulated time, you don't make that quota, you're out. But at the same time, you're not allowed to take specific types of donations, "because you're new and only staff can do that" - never mind the fact that you already know how to do it. Numbers, numbers, numbers...

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    *Consider the idea of a portable card reader for your street fundraisers. You may gripe about the initial cost of it, but from a business perspective I see much more benefits than demerits from investing in a card reader. Less time is spent filling out detailed personal and financial information on a paper form, the card and most of the donor information goes through immediately, there is a lower chance of wrong information due to human error, and donors themselves feel more comfortable knowing that you didn't just spend ten minutes looking at all their sensitive information, after which you will be carrying it around with you in a binder than can easily get wet, damaged, lost or stolen. Then, since a transaction will take about 1/3 the time it currently takes with paper forms, there is a lot more time for you fundraisers to talk to other people - and thereby secure even more donors than before.

    *Stop focusing solely on numbers and neglecting the entire body of potential a new hire has. I understand this is fundraising, but at the same time not EVERYTHING is about numbers - especially for newbies who have no prior experience doing this kind of thing, but have the passion and determination to become great, if given a little bit of time to break in their new position, learn the ropes and given the opportunity to put all of their talent to use.

    *Understand that people are different - impulsive people, people who aren't busy and preoccupied with their own lives and problems when you meet them, quick thinkers/decision makers, those without privacy or security concerns and audio learners are the most likely ones to give immediate information. What about the rest of people? The ones who DO care, DO want to make a difference and DO want to get involves - but are visual learners, or people who need to sit down with the information and go through everything in excruciating detail; or have had security/privacy issues with their personal and financial information so are inclined to do their research before making a bad move again; or those who need to not be in a hurry and fix their personal issues for the day before they can help others. Those are the people you neglect, or pay less attention to, because they're not of any immediate benefit to you. But those people are precisely gems that our organizations need to achieve the goals they set, and those are the people who will stay and help them for as long as they possibly can.

    *Understand this is the kind of position where those numbers you care so much about do not solely depend on how well a person works, especially when there are so many guidelines about who can be a donor and how much can be accepted from them. It also depends a LOT on weather, location, the demographics of the area and the issues affecting the population at the time - both on that specific day and in general. It's absurd and unrealistic to expect every location and every day to be as good as the last - and lay the blame on workers when a required amount is not achieved - when it's so greatly affected by (very obvious) things that are beyond our control.

    *You pride yourselves on being a meritocracy, but too often people are kept because of their "experience" or length of time with the company, despite their blatant lack of caring for the cause and failing to reach goals. Stop being hypocritical, and become the meritocracy you claim to be. Give credit where credit is due, promote where potential is blossoming, and get rid of those who are doing nothing yet making money from you, because they're your friend and you don't want to let them go.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Public Outreach Response

    Aug 6, 2014National Recruitment Manager POUSA

    Thank you for your feedback on your experience with our company. You mention numbers quite a bit in your response, and the reality is since we are paid out of a charities fundraising budget we have ... More

  8.  

    Lots of opportunity to grow for entry level folks.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Public Outreach full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    A good place to get your feet wet with everyday skills in sales and leadership.

    Cons

    Limited growth/pay potential once in the "Fundraising Manager" position.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Innovate past the entry level positions.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9.  

    I wasn't there long enough to rate it fairly, but the employees seemed satisfied.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Public Fundraiser in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Public Fundraiser in Los Angeles, CA

    I have been working at Public Outreach full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Regular raises, opportunity to grow in the company, working with great people. The employees seemed happy and satisfied.

    Cons

    The public fund raising is grueling, and you are outdoors rain or shine. If you don't make your quota after a while, even due to person problems or illness, you might get fired. I spoke with two employee who told me that happened to them.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    There could be some improvements made with the training. Maybe people in the evaluation period should be given a little more time to shadow their supervisors. One of the employees in the eval period said he would like more training on closing the sale. I noticed that a few times I needed help with closing with good, potential monthly donor, the supervisor didn't see me flagging him or her. I was only there three days.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10. 1 person found this helpful  

    Best, most rewarding job I've ever had!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Coach/Supervisor in Vancouver, BC (Canada)
    Current Employee - Coach/Supervisor in Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    I have been working at Public Outreach full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    - Ethically responsible on all levels
    - GREAT team culture
    - Great appreciation of employees
    - Great benefits package (after 6 mos)
    - Thorough training and ongoing support
    - Hourly wage with rapid increase

    Cons

    Performance-based job (however, I believe commission is unethical for charity fundraising)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  11.  

    Great Job Opportunity!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Fundraising Manager in Toronto, ON (Canada)
    Current Employee - Fundraising Manager in Toronto, ON (Canada)

    I have been working at Public Outreach full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Working at Public Outreach has been a great experience for me. It challenges you to grow and develop skills that are highly valuable for future workplaces. I've learned a lot about talking with people confidently, sharing my passions, and developing the skills of people the work alongside me. Public Outreach is an energetic working environment that gives you a platform on which to be a part of much needed change both locally and globally.

    Cons

    Because Public Outreach focuses on raising funds for charities, its important that we keep our response high. This means that there is pressure on canvassers to turn their conversations into charitable contributions. For me, this is fun and rewarding, however it's understandable that this is not a job that suits everyone's personalities.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    I've seen a lot of positive changes being made by upper management that gives more opportunities and better benefits for staff, in the past few years. My advice would be keep that up!

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

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