Radyne Reviews

3 Reviews
3.1
3 Reviews

Recommend to a friend
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Justin Mortimer
0 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    Senior Engineer

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Radyne

    Pros

    Good compensation, interesting work, stock options.

    Cons

    Commute was difficult. South Phoenix a little rough after dark.

  2.  

    Cutting Edge

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Radyne as an intern for less than a year

    Pros

    New technology and processes that contribute to a "green" environment; timesaving

    Cons

    More exposure needed to get the public to know about the product

    No opinion of CEO
  3.  

    Not the company it could have been.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Software Engineering Intern  in  Milwaukee, WI
    Current Employee - Software Engineering Intern in Milwaukee, WI

    I have been working at Radyne as an intern for less than a year

    Pros

    Some of the pros? Well, there's not many. The field of work is interesting, involving a little-known field of induction heat treatment, and the company seeks a competitive edge by establishing a base for research and development of new technologies. The projects they are working on are quite interesting, at least in theory, and it provides an interesting mix of shop-floor work and high-level engineering. Those wanting practical applications of control theory, interested in induction heat treatment, or who may be looking for a decent manufacturing or mechanical engineering position, may be further inclined to explore this company's offerings. Benefits are okay, but only really apply to full-time employees.

    Cons

    As far as cons go, this company has quite a few. There is little planning, testing, or requirements analysis, which, considering my position as a software engineer, is a very bad thing. Our projects are consistently under-planned, often over-budget, and usually sacrifice stability and maintainability for the sake of additional minor features implemented at the last second, at the request of management. Our sales team decides to sell products far before they are completed, forcing the engineers and technicians to crash projects with money, people, and resources. Interns are hired for one role, and are forced to pick up slack in other roles due to employees quitting, projects crashing, or people not having adequate experience for their intended roles. Very few major project decisions are documented, and there is either too much or too little centralization of engineering decisions and details, which are often bottlenecked through specific employees, and rarely ever made easily-accessible or even available to the rest of the company. Productivity tools and basic development resources are poorly supplied, and are often introduced or purchased by the employees themselves. Communication between employees and management is extremely one-sided, and critical concerns regarding safety, procedure, and basic functionality are downplayed in favor of often-trivial concerns, or are not identified before development is begun, leading to major issues later on in project life cycles. No risk analysis is done during project planning. Safety protocol is occasionally blatantly disregarded on the shop floor, and there is little respect for work space organization outside of the parts tracking system. Products are often hacked together due to lack of adequate development time, and unrealistic expectations from management. The overall level of employee job satisfaction is extremely low. Very little project training or introduction is done for new employees, since no one has full project knowledge or the resources to be able to present and introduce a project adequately. The amenities for employees are present but poor-quality, and there is very little room for the engineers or technicians to work, or even to park their cars, although an expansion to the building and parking lot is planned. The pay rate is terrible for a Milwaukee-area engineering internship, and there is one pay rate for interns, regardless of field or expertise. All in all, this company really needs to shape up how it operates across the board, or they will soon be out of business.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Learn how to listen to and leverage your engineers' knowledge, advice, and abilities instead of telling them what to do; having that knowledge and advice is why they get to call themselves engineers. Learn how to really build a project business plan, and analyze the business requirements of a project. Get over your irrational fear of engineering process, model-based engineering, and test-driven development. Track progress during the development cycle, and record historical data on the capabilities of this company and of your employees, and use these tools as a baseline for planning the level of expected work for your projects. Do this, and the company will start seeing happier employees, more complete and on-time projects, and increased overall revenue and reputation.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

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