Riot Games Reviews

Updated March 13, 2015
221 reviews filtered by
  • Any Location
  • Any Job Title
4.5
221 Reviews
Rating Trends
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Riot Games CEO Brandon Beck
Brandon Beck
189 Ratings

Pros
  • Everything the company does is to give the League of Legends players the best experience (in 22 reviews)

  • People say there is a lack of work-life balance, but this must vary from team to team (in 9 reviews)

Cons
  • The work-life balance is flexible and adaptable, everyone is really understanding (in 30 reviews)

  • Compensation for some roles is abysmal for the cost of living in Santa Monica (in 16 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Employee Reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1. Featured Review

    Helpful (41)

    Strong on Culture and Teamwork. Finding its Way as it Matures

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Riot Games full-time (more than 3 years)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    I'm not sure how to break this down into a simple list of pros and cons. Everything about Riot is dual-edged and requires consistent grounding to maintain realistic perspectives. If I could summarize, Rioters are given great power. "And with great power comes great responsibility."

    Riot believes in its cultural manifesto. Culture drives everything, but it's not as simple as reading and consenting to the manifesto. Riot culture is a mirror through which Rioters reflect on whether we're winning or losing both as a company and as individuals, and it requires ongoing introspection even after years of working here.

    Riot has lots of perks. Free meals, parties, international trips, lots of swag, relaxed work environment, flexible hours, unlimited PTO, time allotted to play games, playfund (they will pay for you to buy games), etc. Riot takes good care of its employees and strives to create a work environment that is fun and challenging. Many on the outside accidentally mistake this for culture. It isn't. Culture is the set of shared values we can agree upon as being important to us and describing who we aspire to be.

    During the interview process, candidates are screened not only on their raw qualifications (what have they accomplished, can they perform the job function), but on whether they demonstrate clear alignment with Riot's cultural values. Yearly 360-Reviews break feedback down into categories aligned with the cultural manifesto. A large portion of Riot's senior leadership is focused on how to make sure Riot's culture remains intact as the organization continues to grow globally. This has some interesting manifestations as it comes to hiring and career growth.

     - Culture is prized more than raw technical ability in a hire. A candidate may be intellectually brilliant or driven, but will not make it through if they seem to lack humility or a default orientation toward succeeding as a team versus as an individual. I have witnessed any number of amazing engineers either be passed over as a hire or leave the company because at the end of the day they valued building awesome technology more than they valued how that technology was creating better experiences for the player. This is neither a pro nor a con, but it is a reality that potential Rioters should understand and keep in mind.

     - Promotion and career progression are disconnected from how "hard" one works, who they know, or one's particular work quality (unless that quality is sub-par). It's mostly a function of one's demonstrated ability to force-multiply; to help their team or other teams to accomplish more and to drive new ways to approaching problems. "Senior" individuals are not looked at as merely having greater expertise than their peers or having higher throughput. They're primarily viewed as people who are able to create an environment or atmosphere that removes obstacles and makes their peers feel empowered. Thus, longevity or delivery on mere quantity of features doesn't play well for advancement.

     - Everything is done as part of a team. Lone-wolves, no matter how brilliant, will not succeed long term. Individual contributors are not highly valued unless they are also helping to level up the rest of their peers. Individual quantity, throughput, or flashes of brilliance don't really make up for failure in this regard.

     - Internal advancement to senior leadership is primarily achieved through challenging convention - championing some new idea or problem space - and being able to rally a team around it. Waiting for a new department to have an open leadership slot is not very effective. Most senior leaders I've observed that weren't external hires were folks who identified a problem space they cared about passionately, were able to rally others around around it, and ended up proposing and creating the team/department from wholecloth.

     - Management will generally not tell you what to do. This is good for the type of people Riot wants to attract, not so good for those who are fundamentally task-oriented. Leaders at Riot want to clarify goals and expectations, but unless you're an associate level, they don't want to tell you what to do or how to do it. They generally expect that Rioters are capable of thinking for themselves and understand when to reach out to their teammates or leaders for alignment or help. But individual Rioters are expected to own this themselves and figure out what needs to be done. This can be empowering much of the time, but also frustrating when a Rioter lacks clarity and doesn't understand how to seek it.

    Lastly, on the positive side, Riot's culture of open feedback has created an environment where everything mentioned in this review (both in pros here and the cons below) can be (and are regularly) discussed openly. Riot isn't a perfect organization - it's made of human beings after all - but it is an organization that craves feedback and opportunities to learn how to be better all the time.

    Cons

    Same with the pros above, I don't consider these purely negative, but they do present some challenges. Most of these center on how Rioters communicate effectively as the scale of the company increases.

     - Hiring feels SLOW. The need to maintain Riot culture in addition to finding highly qualified candidates can make it feel like you're constantly searching for a unicorn. It's super important to find cultural fits. But if your team needs to hire 5 people to succeed, get ready to feel like you're short on resources for the next year.

     - Immature communication channels. Riot is gradually figuring out how to manage team interactions as the company grows across multiple offices, but this can often be painful. There is still some startup mentality where people think they can just call folks into a room/meeting and everyone will be on the same page. This can sometimes lead to a sense that you need to be "in the room" in order to have your opinion matter.

     - Too many recurring meetings. As Riot grows and it becomes harder to have casual face-to-face conversations with all stakeholders, lots of folks try to schedule meetings as a replacement. These drain the productive juices out of many participants. Be prepared to push back on any meeting invite that doesn't have a set, clear agenda. They will try to take over your calendar.

     - Weak meeting facilitation. Riot prides itself on being a flat organization. Bosses don't dominate the discussion and all Rioters are encouraged to participate. Riot tries to create a meritocratic environment for surfacing ideas in meetings, where anyone is encouraged to speak up at any time. But without strong facilitation, this often leads to people who are willing to interrupt or those whose style is to "think out loud" to be the majority of the voice that gets heard. This has led to an impression among many that when it comes to getting your vision across at Riot, only alpha personalities are valued. This is an unfortunate (and inaccurate) perception, but it's not helped by lack of strong facilitation during meetings. Riot needs to learn stronger facilitation techniques in order to maintain meritocratic interactions without accidentally promoting a culture that values "waiting to talk" over listening. Be prepared to exercise patience here.

     - Side-effects of a strong culture of ownership. Usually this is a great thing, as it encourages teams to take responsibility for what they create end-to-end without pointing fingers when they assumed another team would handle something for them. But a side effect one will notice over time is that some teams come to believe they own an entire type of problem space for the company and can become territorial when other teams start to tread in their domain. This is something management seems sort of aware of and is gradually dealing with over time, but it can be a pain point. People who excel at inter-team collaboration and relationship building will be most effective under these circumstances.

     - Individual Rioters are responsible for maintaining their own work/life balance. This is a positive in principle, but I think the company could do more to arm new Rioters with some practical tools & techniques. Nobody makes you stay late or work weekends, but it's very easy to fall into doing that at Riot if you don't make a conscious effort to stay on top of it.

    Advice to Management

    Keep the strong focus on culture as the company continues to grow. Do more to articulate this externally with prospective hires. Riot culture is something with a lot of nuance, and many potential hires are coming into this with little understanding of how Riot actually thinks about its own values.

     Riot places a lot of emphasis on leadership and cultivating leadership qualities. Start to place equal emphasis on communications and facilitation as the company grows in order to allow leadership and teams to scale, and to ensure all Rioters feel they have adequate venues to contribute their ideas.

  2. Helpful (2)

    Great Humbitious company

    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Riot Games

    Pros

    Really focused on their manifesto

    Cons

    Growing up company.. need to refine system and polices

  3. Helpful (1)

    Friendly, modern, and ambitious work environment of talented and unique people.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Publishing in Santa Monica, CA
    Current Employee - Publishing in Santa Monica, CA

    I have been working at Riot Games

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Networking, prestige-factor, excellent benefits, work environment, and pay

    Cons

    Many management levels makes it difficult to get any game-changing, significant changes done to existing systems

    Advice to Management

    Narrow down on priorities and work with lower levels to produce the best systems and updates possible

  4. Is this helpful? The community relies on everyone sharing – Add Anonymous Review


  5. Helpful (2)

    You'll feel empowered without feeling adrift.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Technical Game Designer
    Current Employee - Technical Game Designer

    I have been working at Riot Games full-time (more than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Riot invests heavily in people. This means they take recruiting seriously, really want to provide employees training, opportunities and support, but then they get out of the way at the end of the day and let you make smart decisions. I have never seen a company that operates like this before and it's incredibly empowering.

    Riot really believes in players and every decision is made in terms of its player benefit.

    Management is really open to change. In fact, you are required to fix things that you find broken, not just complain about them.

    The spirit of empowering and trusting individuals extends everywhere. There is no official vacation policy; Rioters really are permitted and encouraged to take whatever personal time they need. There is little intrusion from accounting or finance. Projects are measured in terms of player resonance, not revenue.

    Compensation is high for the industry, but Santa Monica is an expensive place to live.

    The new office is going to set a new high standard for the industry.

    Cons

    Hope you like League of Legends. While there are R&D projects underway, it's still hard to fit in if you aren't a die-hard League player.

    The environment is chaotic. There are always a million things going on. This is not a good place for people who just like to be handed their next task (versus going out and finding work to do) or for people who have to be informed about everything (versus trusting that the right decisions were being made).

    The studio is growing really fast as it tries to make its commitments to players. It is a challenge to maintain company culture and values in the face of such rampant growth and Riot always lacks sufficient leaders.

    Advice to Management

    Your processes are not as efficient as you believe. Riot thinks that it operates quickly, but it is a very slow studio. What Riot does earn with the way it works is incredibly high morale.

    Slow down growth! It's terrifying.

  6. Helpful (8)

    Riot’s a fantastic company, but not for everyone

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Santa Monica, CA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Santa Monica, CA

    I have been working at Riot Games full-time (more than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    - Mission: Riot is so authentically committed to its mission. Every decision we make is always in interest of players. Even when we screw up, we think about how we could’ve made it better. The mission singularly aligns all of us to use our best judgement to always prioritize what brings the most value to players.

    - Empowerment and growth: Since coming to Riot, and for the first time in my 11 year career, I feel like I can bring my whole self to work. I don’t feel like a round peg getting pushed into a square hole. Not only am I empowered and encouraged to be myself, being at Riot has help mature me into the best version of me. There is an incredible group of peers and leadership that care so much about my growth, that they’re willing to invest hours upon hours in my professional development. This isn’t unique to just my experience - Rioters care so earnestly about leveling one another up, the growth is exponential.

    - Autonomy and entrepreneurial spirit: Rioters are expected to write their own story. It’s up to us to define what our path is, and Riot provides the environment where we can make that happen. Autonomy doesn’t mean going rogue or bulldozing your own ideas - they still require stakeholder vetting and buy-in. What this means is we’re in an environment where we’re encouraged to pursue big ideas, and find ways to make them real, but as a team. Managers also won’t hold your hand and tell you what to do. Riot is constantly working in ambiguity - if you need an ultra regimented or structured environment, Riot’s not for you.

    - Culture: This is what makes Riot special. Riot has such a firm sense of who we are, and who we’re not. The Riot Manifesto is real inside our walls, and there are stories for each one. It’s also a crucible - our limits get put to the test, and it can be really tough if you’re not prepared to handle it.

    - People: Rioters are the most passionate people I’ve ever met - it’s practically contagious. Most Rioters are interested in working as teams to achieve awesome stuff, and are not interested in drama or nasty-politicking.

    - Work/life balance: I used to be in the camp that felt that Rioter work/life balance was really bad, and that Riot needs to step in to manage/coach us better at this. Over the past year I had a lot of personal obligations come up that required me to take time off, sometimes at inconvenient times. I was able to make every wedding and family function last year (and they all required travel). Why was I able to? Because Riot’s unlimited PTO, flexible schedules, and results oriented environment allowed me to make the call if I can get my stuff done in order to commit to these personal obligations. It’s true that Rioters spend a lot of time at work, but we’re also responsible for finding the sustainable balance that’s right for us. We shouldn’t rely on Riot to coach us on how to adopt sustainable behaviors as professionals.

    Cons

    - Leadership gaps: Our hiring philosophy tends to favor hiring those with growth for potential over raw talent. This has worked for us, but we now are dealing with major leadership gaps in critical parts of the org. There are bottom heavy teams, where junior managers are managing over 20 reports (seriously). Even though Riot’s identified this weakness and have prioritized hiring leaders in these key roles, there’s lots of chaos between managers, and teams are severely undermanaged as a result until we’re able to find and put those senior leaders in place.

    - Bro culture is real: This comes up a lot in other reviews because it’s true. I perceive that we have a higher male to female ratio compared to previous game/tech companies I’ve worked at in the past, but it doesn’t seem to discourage bro culture at Riot. Default gender pronouns tend to be “he”, jokes among team members can be inappropriate, women more often expected to take on administrative responsibilities (even amongst male peers). More recently these behaviors have surfaced as areas we have to improve, and there are groups inside Riot to be change agents - it’s far from being a toxic environment, but is a major weak area that needs to improve sooner than later.

    - Professionalism: Maybe this is a sign that I’m a curmudgeon, but Rioters are rowdy...and sometimes not in a fun way. More junior Rioters run the gamut of unprofessional behaviors: consistently late to meetings (or not responding to invites), inconsistent follow up/through, being super loud in open workspace (especially while playing games), leaving common areas like conference rooms super messy...and it doesn’t end there. I don’t think Rioters do this to be intentionally discourteous, but it’s super frustrating nonetheless.

    - Noise and distraction: It’s just loud. Our open floorplan + bad noise management in the building makes concentration at your desk nearly impossible. I rely on working from home more often in order to get work done - I would normally opt to find a phone booth room to sequester myself in, but with the shortage of conference room space at our current HQ, it’s just easier to stay at home. I hope that this is resolved in our new space /crossesfingers

    - Communication: We just super suck at this, across the board. Teams get spun up and down constantly and many individuals possess tribal knowledge and don’t pass them on to others. There are lots of situations where you find out two teams are working on the same problem, but in different ways, all because they don’t know to talk to one another. We really need to identify how to connect teams locally and globally to one another.

    - Feedback: Riot’s a feedback oriented culture, except Rioters are terrible at giving feedback. It’s common these days for Rioters to assume feedback means it’s critical in nature. There are many junior Rioters that were surprised to discover that there is such a thing as positive feedback. This exists because you have a ton of uncoached people giving feedback in a number of ways, many of which can be either untactful or just plain unhelpful. Riot claims to be good at this, but we’re not. Instead of just saying, “give feedback to this person”, we need to coach Rioters on the ways to best give and receive it.

    - Culture misfits: I’ve detected a number of Rioters in influential positions who feel like culture misfits - those who are seeking to engage in ugly politics and glad-handing. I worry that because of their senior roles they will poison their groups, but go undetected because of their effectiveness at managing up. Long term this is especially worrisome because the larger Riot is, the more likely the subculture goes undetected.

    Advice to Management

    Continue to focus on hiring leaders, but carefully vet for culture fit. Some of the leaders in the org raise lots of concerns in being culturally aligned, but are so adept at talking the talk that they may go undetected. Ask around, gather insight (and not just from their reports), but also from peers that may offer more unfiltered feedback. Good people will leave in droves if there’s a perception that politicking Rioters who glad-hand with the right leaders succeed over those who don’t.

  7. Amazing company with good culture

    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Santa Monica, CA
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in Santa Monica, CA

    I have been working at Riot Games part-time (less than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Everything works from the culture to the workplace

    Cons

    It's hard not to spend the entire day there

    Advice to Management

    Keep up the good work

  8. Helpful (4)

    "Working hard for something we don’t care about is called stress; working hard for something we love is called passion"

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Hong Kong (Hong Kong)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    I have been working at Riot Games full-time (less than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    When looking to leave my last job, for about 12 months I explored numerous opportunities at various MNC's and Financial Institutions, always leaving the interviews a bit disheartened by the lack of emphasis that was put on Talent. When I was invited to meet with the guys at Riot, on conducting my pre-interview research, I was delighted to read about the employee focused culture, but I also maintained a healthy portion of skepticism as so many companies talk the talk, but so few walk the walk. I have now been with Riot for 6 months and I am thrilled, amazed and relieved to be part of a company that wholeheartedly practices what it preaches.

    Riot views its Talent (aka Rioters) as its number 1 resource. Aside from the benefits like unlimited holidays, flexible hours, top of the market health plan, free snacks/fruit etc..... for me, it is the empowerment/ownership that Riot offers which demonstrates the true value that is put on staff. You are hired as an expert in your respective discipline, and treated as such. Bizarrely, in today's market this is a rarity (from my experience).

    A talent focused culture creates an environment where people will go the extra mile, not because their boss is telling them to, but because they are incredibly passionate about what they are doing, and embrace the opportunity to transfer their passion to our players. By ensuring that everyone is on the same page when it comes to hiring new talent, and never dropping the bar for the sake of a 'quick fix', an environment has been nurtured where everyone is pulling in the same direction, with the same goal of improving the player experience for everyone that comes into contact with Riot or a Rioter.

    Cons

    * Riot is not for everyone - a culture of true empowerment is extremely satisfying for some, but can be very daunting for others. If you are considering applying to us, have a very honest conversation with yourself as to whether this is something you want
    * Being in a company of hardcore gamers, I always get beaten when playing!
    * Buckets of passion it great, but I can imagine it burning people out if they don't make time for friends, family and health. Riot actively encourages this, but it can be forgotten!
    * The interview process can be very lengthy, but this thoroughness is essential in ensuring we are hiring the right people. Also, as we are smaller in Hong Kong, things can happen a lot quicker!

    Advice to Management

    * Keep doing what you are doing
    * Don't let our rapid growth lead to dropping the bar when it comes to hiring (be it in passion or aptitude)
    * We are a global company in the truest sense to the word. Make sure we are viewed as such both internally and externally

  9. Helpful (5)

    The Truth About Riot Games

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Player Support Management in Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)
    Current Employee - Player Support Management in Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    I have been working at Riot Games full-time (less than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    When I say this is literally the best place I have ever worked, I mean it. This is accounting for a full career in leadership and management roles spanning 20+ years, 10 of which have been in the games industry working for the most recognized names in gaming. Every place I have worked has had a set of "core values", but only 2 of them have ever really shown some belief in those values (Riot being one of them), and only Riot has fully nailed them from aspiration to execution, while truly living those values through their actions, extending to (and especially in) the "customer service" side of the business.

    Below are some bullets of the things that make Riot the top of the list for me:

    Ethos/Culture - What you do proves what you believe. The Riot Manifesto isn't just some catchy words or phrases that a group of execs put together to communicate what they aspire to be as an organization. It isn't pasted around the office on brightly colored posters pontificating how you should behave to be a Rioter. The Manifesto and it's guiding principles are the foundation of every action, decision, and endeavor that Riot undertakes. Each individual is able to articulate how their contribution impacts the player experience, and while the recruitment process is brutal (more on that later), it is designed to identify those that share a deep connection with and belief in those principles.

    Empowerment/Trust - At Riot, you can make mistakes as long as you don't repeat them, and as long as you are learning in the process. I have never in my career in leadership and management roles been so completely empowered. There are no strings attached, and I know that as long as I am accountable and responsible while demonstrating a strong, guided reason for my decisions, I can do pretty much anything. That isn't an exaggeration ... I am trusted to make decisions that impact Riot as a whole, and that trust is as common at Riot as grains of sand on a beach.

    Intellectual Stimulation - I am working with some of the most intelligent people I have ever met, hands down. And I don't mean just smart ... these people are next level. Riot's philosophy on hiring extreme talent with shared ethos and passion has resulted in a work space that is continuously stimulating with healthy, engaging debate, conversation, and work. The bar here is exceptionally high, and because of that you are constantly meeting new people that continue to raise your expectation of what amazing is. Also, I might add, without the pretentious bullsh*t.

    Passion/Engagement - Riot cares, and the people do to. That is because everyone shares that common ethos and a passion, not just for League of Legends and gaming in general, but for achieving excellence and mastery. And if excellence has been achieved, they celebrate it ... then raise the bar again. It is an endless quest for perfection in a group of people that love what they do. Imagine that for a moment, and what it is like to work with those people every day.

    Personal/Professional Growth Opportunities - Leveling up is an integral part of being a Rioter. As I mentioned before, there is an endless quest for mastery and Riot supports this at every turn. There is a constant stream of educational and development opportunities through a variety of channels, and if there is something unique that you want to do that will help level up both you and Riot (even sometimes not directly related to your current role), there is support for that as well. As an example, I recently wanted to take an academic accreditation in a specific methodology for leadership, management, and communications. From start to finish, the approval for this took a day despite the fact that there was a cost associated with it ... that should tell you something about how Riot operates and looks at professional growth. No one has to tell me that the expectation is that I will take what I learn, bring it to Riot, and level up the other Rioters around me by sharing this knowledge. And damned right I will.

    Cons

    Recruitment Process - The recruitment process can be incredibly brutal. There can be long delays in communication before and after screenings and interviews, and the overall process is lengthy as well due to the number of people in various locations involved in every new hire process. They are working on making this process better, but it is still quite painful for many applicants.

    Ambiguity - Riot doesn't really do black and white. If you are looking for a data and process driven work environment with people telling you what to do and when to do it, you probably wont fit the majority of roles at Riot. Riot uses data to inform decisions, yes, but context is king. You don't get to lay back and say "well the numbers say x so y is correct". You have to figure out a lot of things, and in some cases this is great ... in other cases, it is a sign of missing direction or leadership and this is something that Riot is beginning to tackle, though it is pretty rare from what I have seen. The result in these rare situations is misalignment, which in turn can cause confusion and frustration.

    Blistering Pace - Things are constantly changing and evolving ... some people love this, some people don't. I love it and thrive in an environment that moves at a fast pace, but I know there are a lot of people out there that prefer a more consistently stable and routine work environment. Riot really is a culture of work hard, play hard. If you can't keep up, chances are you will be left behind. To use an anthropological analogy, Riot is hunter friendly, not farmer friendly.

    Cost of Living - Dublin, while a super cool city, is incredibly expensive in terms of cost of living. Rents are so expensive that as a sole provider in your family, things can be tight even on an above average salary, especially if you want to live in a family-friendly area around Dublin without a hellish commute to the office. That can add extra pressure if you aren't prepared for this change when moving to Dublin. If you are single and going for an entry level role, chances are you will have to find a flatmate if you want to live close to work.

    Advice to Management

    Preserve the Culture - Do not let even one person in at a level of influence that doesn't genuinely share your ethos. Even if it is the most highly recommended well respected so and so from the biggest most successful company in the world. I have witnessed first hand the at first slow, then rapidly accelerating decay of an aspirational set of core values and a passionate culture because of a middle-management layer that doesn't give a damn about what we do or why we do it. Instead, they are there only to drive their own career and ego at any cost. And that cost is usually your good people and your precious culture.

    My biggest fear for Riot is that they somehow let that one person through that is really good at managing upwards and diverting the leadership levels of the organization from the culture destroying actions that they are perpetrating on those that they are responsible for, however subtle those actions might be. Just as your games are nothing without the players, your business is nothing without your passionate people. That being said, I hope that the open feedback culture will help prevent this scenario.

  10. Helpful (1)

    Great people make a great place, the company embraces the philosophy.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Publishing Manager in Santa Monica, CA
    Current Employee - Publishing Manager in Santa Monica, CA

    I have been working at Riot Games full-time (more than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    High growth company that kept strong roots. Good and involved founders and early leadership; who trust the people they bring in. The company will take risks, if it drives positive value. Riot actually walks the talk on being Player Focused, a rare truth in game companies.

    Great options to grow if you'll push yourself. Great, modern, tech workplace that is more focused on self improvement as a means of driving value overall than many in the game space. Amazing commitment to data science.

    Cons

    Growth means change, and rapid growth means...well...rapid change. "Adaptable" has gone from a modest requirement, to an absolute one. For example, this can mean work gets re-prioritized well into the process, and that can feel brutal. It is usually for a clear reason or emergent issue, but it does require a flexible person and a flexible team. If you're not up to change, this is likely not the right place for you.

    Advice to Management

    Stay focused on hiring the right people, never surrender the culture you've built.

  11. Helpful (5)

    Great place to work if you are a cultural fit

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - China - Talent in Hong Kong (Hong Kong)
    Current Employee - China - Talent in Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    I have been working at Riot Games full-time (less than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Everyone believes in our core mission: We aspire to be the most player-focused game company in the world. It's the first company I have worked for that has every team member believe and live by the company's mission.

    This is a great entrepreneurial work environment that gives people the ability to work on what they believe is right. Giving this level of trust means that there is an expectation that you fit culturally here, and your judgement is aligned with Riot.

    Managers here don't tell you what to do here. They are mentors and coaches who give feedback and help you align better to Riot Culture value. They are invaluable in giving you a different perspective on an issue you may not have thought of.

    I am hardcore WoW player, and it's great to finally work at a company where I don't need to be embarrassed that I play games during work hours; as long as I get all my work done of course. So I get to keep up with my Garrison Missions!

    Cons

    If you don't believe and live by Riot culture values or have poor judgement, you will stick out like a nail. Rioters will quickly recognize this, and you will find it hard to succeed; just getting the job done isn't enough here.

    If you like socializing with co-workers after work, there are limited ways due to our startup office size. There are basically two groups right now: core gamers and Chinese speaking. I think this will improve as our office gets larger and more diverse set of Rioters are brought onboard.

    It's really hard to find Chinese leaders that have Riot DNA. We have so much we want to do, but getting the right people to help is hard :(

    Advice to Management

    We should consider a plan to groom high potential talent, as finding experienced Chinese leaders that inherently live by Riot culture values is very difficult.

Work at Riot Games? Share Your Experiences

Riot Games

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.