TNTP Reviews

Updated August 18, 2015
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TNTP CEO Dan Weisberg
Dan Weisberg
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36 Employee Reviews

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  1. Great Nonprofit

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Operations Associate in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Operations Associate in New York, NY
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at TNTP part-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The staff is very passionate and knowledgeable. The management is well-run and solid. People are super friendly and supportive The pay was very reasonable.

    Cons

    I don't have anything negative to say about TNTP.

    Advice to Management

    I think your flexibility, adaptability and willingness to innovate are tremendous! Keep up the good work!


  2. Helpful (3)

    A cog in a machine

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at TNTP full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    -You may be on the road a lot, but the flexibility of working from home when you aren't on the road is an amazing perk that can't be overstated. -Benefits are generally really good as well, although sadly on a downward trajectory. -The bar for the quality of work is generally really high. After a while at TNTP, it is easy to forget that in most work environments, the majority of your colleagues aren't are smart, competent, motivated and articulate.

    Cons

    In terms of overall direction, the organization has been going through a painful reorganization and feels rudderless. However, this might be short-term pain, while TNTP's biggest cons are rooted in its culture. There is a major gap between how little TNTP shows it values its employees, and how much management constantly talks about how much employees are valued. Senior management clearly works for a different company than the majority of the staff. The hypocrisy between what TNTP preaches as human capital management consultants, and what TNTP practices internally is pretty astounding. A couple of examples: As most reviewers have noted, work-life balance is a serious and perennial problem. Management periodically pretends to care, offering up incredibly lame, ineffective "solutions," (e.g. a series of "tips" on how to work more efficiently). The subtext of these initiatives is always (1) some people like working all the time, so if you don't, the problem is really you, or (2) you're probably just inefficient. Thankfully, these meaningless gestures never seem to last longer than a few weeks. "You are ultimately responsible for your own career growth" is the message explicitly communicated to employees. This is a convenient way of offloading responsibility for developing staff onto employees. Ironically, TNTP touts the career opportunities and professional development it offers professionals...but they only apply to a small portion of the staff. Career opportunities are very political. When they are not about good politicking, they are pretty much luck of the draw, dependent on whether or not you get staffed on a project that is high-profile. It is impossible to truly "own" your own development when you get no say on what you work on. No amount of trainings or PDs attended will actually further your career at TNTP; you need to demonstrate that you have already done the work of the position at the next rung on the ladder. (BTW, nothing you've done prior to your employment at TNTP to fulfill this is considered valid.) I strongly believe that poor opportunities are a huge contributor to employee turnover, and personally know numerous employees who have left in frustration over stagnant career growth.

    Advice to Management

    Address work-life balance. Given us meaningful say in the contracts we work on (staff interest surveys that are subsequently ignored actually highlight how little employees matter, and do more harm than good). Increase base salaries. Reduce the rigid hierarchy - there are a lot of amazingly talented, underutilized people toiling in mid- and lower-level positions who feel dis-empowered. Stop "messaging" to employees and start talking to them. If the organization doesn't intend to tackle a challenge, be honest about it. We are all smart enough to know the difference between PR and substantive action, and the former is frustrating and infantalizing.


  3. Associate

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Royal Oak, MI
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Royal Oak, MI
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at TNTP (More than a year)

    Pros

    Generous employee benefits, strong emphasis on client satisfaction, extremely talented coworkers

    Cons

    High rate of employee turnover, constant change of job duties and expectations. For a company that is in the education field I never felt support if I made a mistake. You learn by making mistakes, trying again, and not giving up until it is correct. Working at TNTP I was always so afraid of making a mistake. It seems like there was no room for error and everyone strove to be perfect in a very imperfect field like education.

    Advice to Management

    Give your employees a chance.


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  5. Great organization

    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at TNTP full-time

    Pros

    work where you live, smart colleagues, impactful organization

    Cons

    Fully remote culture can be challenging, but TNTP tries its best to balance the cons


  6. A Means to an End

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Teaching Fellow in Baltimore, MD
    Current Employee - Teaching Fellow in Baltimore, MD
    Doesn't Recommend

    I have been working at TNTP full-time

    Pros

    A fast way to land a full-time teaching job with minimal training. The salary and benefits from the district are good. Also you get to meet some interesting people in your cohort. If you're able to jump through the hoops and cope with all the BS, you'll earn a teaching certificate. Once you pass the program, you have the option to earn a Masters from Hopkins in under a year.

    Cons

    Pre-service training in the summer is hell. It's a complete life-suck, and many people drop out or "fail" the training and can't teach for the district. If you do pass pre-service training, you're subject to a year of "ACE" observations and threats of not being recommended for a teaching certificate. The staff is young and inexperienced and incredibly inauthentic, sometimes even cult-like. Weekly 3-hour seminars during the school year are a total waste of time and are comprised mainly of BS "practice" teaching to fellow residents (as if that's an appropriate approximation of teaching children). Coaches by and large do not do enough to support residents and advocate on their behalf. Furthermore, both coaches, evaluators, and staff are outside the inner-city culture and refuse to seriously talk about the challenges of teaching in an urban district. If you ask any kind of serious or sincere question, all you'll get is a scripted response with a bunch of "Teach Like a Champion" jargon in it.

    Advice to Management

    Be completely upfront about the possibility of failing the program (I didn't realize this until I had already moved 3,000 miles across the country to do the program, and I was really upset that BCTR wasn't more upfront about it. That information should be all over their website and their countless video orientations). Staff needs to be more contextual. Hire more experienced teachers to coach, evaluate, and teach seminars. Acknowledge that urban teaching has its own particular set of difficulties and help residents to navigate and understand the culture. Stop being so high-stakes and cut-throat about everything, first-year teachers have enough stress as it is.


  7. Teaching Fellow

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Exceptional Children's Teacher K-2 in Charlotte, NC
    Former Employee - Exceptional Children's Teacher K-2 in Charlotte, NC
    Recommends

    I worked at TNTP full-time

    Pros

    Positive can do attitudes. Tenacious teacher training weeds out the weak. Continuous support. Top notch information and unique training gives teaches a 4 year head start.

    Cons

    High work load. Stress inducing nd energy zapping boot camp. Idealistic at times. Easy acceptance into the program allows for negative and pessimistic people with poor work ethic which ruins morale.

    Advice to Management

    The quality of the coaching can make or break a cohort. Provide more support through out the school year and less work requirements on the portfolio.


  8. Helpful (1)

    Ed Pioneer

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    Very , very smart, committed people.

    Cons

    Definitely take themselves too seriously.


  9. Helpful (1)

    Coach

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at TNTP part-time

    Pros

    A big pro is this company main goal is to help new teachers. They want to develop teachers so that they will have a positive impact on student achievement.

    Cons

    There are alot of type of A people there. Type A is good but it would be nice to a have a balance.

    Advice to Management

    It will be helpful to have more employees who can directly relate to the students they serve. Some employees have a false sense of understanding.


  10. Helpful (1)

    Program operations

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at TNTP part-time

    Pros

    Very professional, productive staff members who are there to work and take their jobs seriously. Generally a transparent environment where people will know how they're doing. Strong emphasis on personal professional development.

    Cons

    Way too understaffed--people singlehandedly running and managing huge operations that really require at least three or four other people to run smoothly. While it can be nice that everyone takes their jobs seriously, some of them take their jobs too seriously and it can be grating. Mostly staffed by TFA alumni who no longer want to be in the classroom for whatever reason. TNTP has its employees actively enforcing policies that may or may not be best practices for fellows. Part-time work is tricky for an organization like TNTP. They are pretty well set up to offer part-time work, because they have a variety of projects that are seasonal or short-term, but working part-time for TNTP is like working full time for anyone else, without the benefits or salary. They will constantly contact you outside of the agreed upon hours, and because their sense of urgency is so extreme, it can be really stressful. Work-life balance is a constant struggle, especially during the crazier parts of the enrollment season/school year. As someone who has spent the better part of my career working out a work-life balance that I feel comfortable with, having those boundaries violated for a low-paying part-time position was a deal breaker for me. People who enter TNTP after having worked in inner city schools will understand that work-life balance is critical to working effectively in education management.

    Advice to Management

    Reconsider your staffing numbers at certain sites. Create stronger boundaries and guidelines in protecting part-time workers from being exploited by their salaried supervisors. Focus on retention and keeping staffers in the same departments or at the same sites over constant internal promotion, which upsets the carefully created balance at regional offices.


  11. A great opportunity to develop teaching skills in the summer

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    Pros

    Increased familiarity with proven TLAC techniques Leadership experience gained working with adults

    Cons

    Dis-organized at times Felt like a sorority at times



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