The Washington Institute for Near East Policy

  www.washingtoninstitute.org
  www.washingtoninstitute.org

The Washington Institute for Near East Policy Reviews

Updated December 4, 2014
Updated December 4, 2014
4 Reviews
3.9
4 Reviews

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  1.  

    For research assistants, interesting work, amazing access, wonderful mentor relationships

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Research Assistant in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Research Assistant in Washington, DC

    I worked at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy

    Pros

    One's experience will depend on his/her relationship with the senior fellow he/she is paired with. Overall, great, collegial atmosphere, very little hierarchy, and research assistants tend to be very tight knit group. Senior fellows are very approachable and have open-door policy, so research assistants (RAs) have access to them and other senior officials who pass through the Institute. The Institute produces top notch work and the senior fellows are extremely knowledgeable, experienced, and well-connected. Along with the interesting research projects and amazing access comes the expectation that RAs and interns will do much of the grunt work -- this means arranging tables and setting up food for events, cleaning up afterwards, and covering for the receptionist about once a week. Interns are expected to do much more admin. work like make copies, deal with the mail, etc. For RAs, the breakdown of research work to administrative work is probably about 75% to 25%. Most people I know who were RAs at TWI maintain their relationships with other RAs and senior fellows for many years.

    Cons

    The admin work can be a drag, but if you do it with a positive attitude you will have no issues. The people who complain about it or try to avoid their duties get into trouble. Because interns and RAs are expected to clean up after events, it sometimes feels like there is no expectation for guests and senior fellows to clean up after themselves, which is unfortunate. Not much room to move up the ranks, as is the case with most think tanks. There are many women on the administrative staff and among the interns and RAs, but very few at the top levels. This is something TWI is conscious of, but apparently hasn't been able to change much. Pay isn't great, but don't think it differs much from other think tanks.

    Recommends
  2.  

    No promotions

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy

    Pros

    Work with the experts in the field

    Cons

    Never receive credit for research

    Recommends
  3.  

    Well connected and impeccable work environment/culture - Just pay me

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Research Intern in Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Research Intern in Washington, DC

    I have been working at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    The senior fellows here are heavy hitters in the realm of diplomacy/foreign policy with easily approachable personalities to boot. Speak to them regularly - they are an invaluable resource and most are willing to help you how they can with your future career. The Institute is unbelievably well connected - you won't know who'll show up and speak at our conferences next short of the president of the United States.

    The work is challenging and keeps you on your toes during busy publication periods. Editing, research, fact checking, occasionally drafting.

    Cons

    The Institute is surprisingly tightfisted for their already huge, and still growing budget. Interns do real and difficult work for no pay. Pay is paltry for entry level jobs - barely covering the cost of living in this insanely overpriced city.

    Be prepared for physical and administrative tasks: setting up conferences (cleaning, moving tables/chairs/food), making expense reports, filing business cards, reserving meals, plane flights, taxis, running phone calls and the reception desk, etc.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
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  5.  

    Great place to learn the ropes of research

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Research Intern in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Research Intern in Washington, DC

    I worked at The Washington Institute for Near East Policy as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    The Washington Institute was a great place to wet my beak and get a feel for the field. Many interesting people focusing on many different subjects. In general, most fellows were open to discussing work with interns outside of their own portfolios, so it was an ideal place to learn from a variety of styles.

    Cons

    If unsatisfied with his or her workload or feeling underutilized, the intern can find it difficult to address branch out and take on more responsibility. However, the structure of the intern program allows for this and makes it possible to address the problem so that the issue doesn't get out of hand.

    Recommends

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