Triage Consulting Group Reviews

Updated August 27, 2015
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3.3
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Triage Consulting Group CEO Brian Neece
Brian Neece
55 Ratings

Pros
  • The work-life balance is phenomenal for consulting and the company really cares about the well-being of its people (in 30 reviews)

  • Tons of fun stuff--happy hours, teambuilding, paid volunteer time, team events (in 9 reviews)

Cons
  • The work is 10% Consulting and 90% arguing with insurance companies about collections (in 11 reviews)

  • Promotions are primarily based on time rather than accomplishments (in 3 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

73 Employee Reviews

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  1. Featured Review

    Helpful (8)

    Great opportunity for college grads

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Current Employee - Senior Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Triage Consulting Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Accelerated career track: Most of your first year at Triage is spent learning (how to use our Access database, billing guidelines, industry information, client perspective). For me, that didn't mean just making phone calls all day, but everyone has a different experience based on your project mix. From 12-21 months you are given more client-facing responsibilities and get to train/manage newer employees. From 21 months on (if you have gotten solid evaluations) you are leading your own team. I don't think I could have gotten to a project manager role this quickly at many other jobs out of school. And I rarely call insurance companies anymore... The people: I've made great friends that I'll keep for life. I've made great connections with people that moved on to other companies (built-in networking). There are very few people that I've not enjoyed working with. No 'politics': Until Manager promotions, which are 5 years in and only affect a handful of people, you don't need to pull any House of Cards moves to succeed. If you are good to work with and produce a good work product, you will be promoted - simple as that.

    Cons

    Diversity?: This is a common subject in reviews lately so I should touch on it. I'm not a minority, but I'm not from an upper middle class, greek, sports background. Trust me when I say you can find your people no matter what your background is. I think we aim to hire younger, ambitious, friendly, and capable people, and that's part of why our culture is so great. Not sure this is the diversity crisis it's painted to be; I would chalk it up to the immaturity of some recent college grads. A lot of our events end with/focus on drinking beer, but I don't see that as very different from my friends' companies... Burnout: If you aren't willing to put in the time on the front end to learn the work, you probably won't stay long enough to be Senior and reap the benefits (proj management experience, great pay for the hours worked). For most people this is their first job out of college so I would think this is a standard concept... Merit: If you are a high performer, you are rewarded with more work (which can be great experience/exposure) but no extra pay and few perks. This works for the ambitious go-getters but I know it rubs some people the wrong way. There is a lingering feeling of being replaceable at any time (and it's mostly true, a result of the hiring model) which also makes some high performers uncomfortable.

    Advice to Management

    Some employees will always complain/push for more from you, which is probably necessary for an organization to move forward. However, when something can't happen, we at least appreciate when you justify why and show some transparency. Often there is a business reason that isn't obvious to us and whenever you communicate your organizational perspective in a clear way, you earn trust with your employees. This happens sometimes, but the more the better. Also, Yammer is pretty weird.


  2. Associate

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Current Employee - Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Doesn't Recommend

    I have been working at Triage Consulting Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The people are amazing, the transparency within the company is great, and you know whether you are on track for promotion

    Cons

    Our salary is well beneath what we should be earning, and we log hours down to the quarter hour rather than focusing on specific tasks.


  3. Great company to start out with , especially for a career in the medical field.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Analyst in San Francisco, CA
    Current Employee - Analyst in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Triage Consulting Group full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Young people, fun atmosphere and continual training. This job gives you plenty of opportunities to learn about the corporate world of healthcare consulting while allowing you to develop socially as a professional.

    Cons

    No bonus program to entice better performance. A person who busts their back to get ahead will be compensated equally to an employee who squeaks by. Company can seem a little too fraternity/sorority oriented after a while.

    Advice to Management

    Look into creating a more competitive environment, that includes a bonus system based on performance.


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  5. Helpful (4)

    Great opportunity to live like a college student as a post grad

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Triage Consulting Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    -The people, the people, the people. Triage does a great job of hiring social college students who will go out of their way to make the most of a fun, post-Greek-life company culture. -The hours are steady at 45 hours per week. I never had to stay late, never answered an email outside of the office, and never had to come in on the weekend. -If you are competent and have a decent attitude, you will get promoted to Senior Associate at 21 months. No sooner, no later. If you dislike uncertainty, this could be a great pro. This is a fairly quick path to actual project management. -If you are intelligent and ambitious, you can leverage the job into a far better one. The top 10-25% of Triagers leave for solid jobs in tech, banking (occasionally), or top 10 MBA programs. -There is a focus on developing professional, soft skills that is useful for college grads with no real full-time business experience prior to this job.

    Cons

    -There is almost no differentiation between high performers and mediocre performers. As mentioned before, if you are truly incompetent or have a poor attitude, you will not get the Senior Associate promotion. Otherwise, you will get promoted, and high performers can lose steam when they realize how easily others can coast along and receive the same evaluation score. -Don't expect "consulting" work for the first 2 years. Expect to audit hospital claims data, peruse through the shorthand notes of claims administrators, and spend the vast majority of your time navigating through insurance phone webs trying to find out where a specific claim’s reimbursement process went wrong. Unless you want to work in healthcare management or a hospital billing department, you'll learn a lot of the minutia about one very specific niche of healthcare that won't apply to your future career. -If you rent an apartment in SF, the starting salary does not go a long way.

    Advice to Management

    With no external differentiation between high and low performers, Triage is relying on the personal drive within high performers to keep them motivated. If people aren't channeling their drive towards their work work, they'll channel it towards job hunting. Management could incentivize Associates with a promotion path contingent on performance. The very top performers are ready to be a second Senior on their fourth or fifth project, while others could be promoted at their sixth or seventh project. Rather than striving to be “good enough” to get promoted at 21 months, your top performers would work harder to prove that they are ready for more responsibility and a raise sooner than others.


  6. Great place to work

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Comp & Benefits
    Former Employee - Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Triage Consulting Group full-time

    Pros

    Triage has great perks like lunch allowance for out of town work, Friday happy hours, baseball games at ATT park and company events. They encourage a good work life balance, and once you leave work, you do not work, which is something I really appreciated after my last two jobs. The office is also in a beautiful location!

    Cons

    The work can get monotonous and there is little room for promotion, other than Senior Associate and then Manager, which both of these take years to reach.


  7. Great People, Repetitive Work

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Summer Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Former Intern - Summer Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Triage Consulting Group as an intern (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Everyone at this company is awesome and they promote a great culture. It is a young company with lots of energy and fun events.

    Cons

    The work can get repetitive and there is about a 20% turnover rate.


  8. Helpful (13)

    Senior Associate

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Senior Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Triage Consulting Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Early Responsibility: The promotion to Senior at 21 months, granted that you have consistently produced solid work and earned positive evaluations after every project, is incredibly valuable. If you are promoted and consistently perform well, your growth in responsibility might look something like: @ 21 Months: Paired with a more tenured senior and co-pilot a large project of between 4-8 associates. This help learn the ropes of the senior role and provides some semblance of training wheels for your first meaningful client interactions. @ ~2 Years: Run your own small project (potentially a team of just you or maybe 1-2 associates if you're a top performer). This is where you really get to "be your own boss" on a day to day basis. You can still expect to do a lot of the associate level work due to team size being small, but you also have more say in the direction of the project and more frequent interaction with clients and upper Triage management @ ~3 Years: Run a project of 2-3 associates (maybe more if you are a rock-star they are grooming for promotion down the road). This is the point at which you get to separate yourself from the daily associate level work (to an extent) and start focusing more on project strategy and driving client value @ ~4 Years: If you are around by year 4, you will have a very good idea of where you stand (favorite for promotion at year 5 or not). If you find yourself in the former group, you will likely be leading a large project of anywhere from 6-8 associates and focusing almost exclusively on managing your team as well as working closely with Triage management on a daily basis I my opinion there is a level of diminishing returns here, but in the early stages following promotion, the experience is something you simply wouldn't be getting at many other places. If you can perform up to the level where you are managing several associates in year 2, you will find yourself advanced well beyond many of your peers in your ability to manage a team, think critically about long term project strategy and planning, and interact confidently with both clients and executives. The People: I will caveat this with saying that by the time I left in early 2015, I had noticed a worrisome, negative trend in terms of firm morale, and it felt like less and less people were truly engaging in what was previously and unrivaled company culture. That said, from 2011 - 2013, I made some of my absolute best friends out of my coworkers and some of my best memories and company events (those put on by the company and otherwise). Triage loves to float a saying created by a former Senior Associate: "Triage is a good job made great by exceptional people." I support this 100%; however, if the social bonds that connected these exceptional people beyond the workplace start to dissolve, then that saying may only be applicable for so much longer. Exit Opportunities / Built-In Networking: The places that the top 25% of people leave Triage to go to are simply exceptional. It's a common occurrence to see 3rd and 4th years leaving the firm for top flight B-Schools (Kellogg, Hass, Anderson, Yale, etc.), Med Schools, manager roles in the healthcare space, or for other top 10 consulting firms. Because of this, it makes it very easy to start networking either within or outside of healthcare almost as soon as you decide it's time to move on. I personally have the job I have now in part due to a former peer at Triage

    Cons

    The Work: There are two types of people that go into Triage: those that want to be consultants and those who want to be involved in healthcare (with a business tint). If you are among the latte, are truly passionate about healthcare, and want to someday be in management at a health system or hospital, then the work might actually be a Pro. However, if you are among those that are of a consulting mindset and want to touch a broader swathe of project and tasks, then you will find yourself disappointed early and often. The rapid career progression goes a long way in masking this, but when rubber meets the road, you will spend 45 hours a week engaging in the same three tasks: (1) Working in an access database to try and convert PDF contracts between insurance companies and hospitals into a series of queries that determine how a hospital bill should have been paid, (2) researching claims where payment doesn't equal what you expected, and (3) corresponding with insurance companies via phone and mail in order to try to explain why payment should have been more than what it was. Occasionally, something different will come across your plate, but in the interest of being candid and honest, this will comprise 90-95% of your weeks up until your 3rd year or so when it will dwindle to around 60-70%. A Lack of Vision / Willingness to Change: If you are passionate about innovation or working on projects aimed at developing efficiencies or better processes, then Triage will frustrate you. There is a top-down culture of "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" that is universal and is not going to change any time soon. This philosophy governs everything: recruiting, types of projects people can work on, compensation, the products and tools that teams work with, etc. As an aside, I ultimately think that this particular con will eventually prove to be the firm's achilles heel and what will allow other firms and the clients Triage serves to catch up and pass them in terms of technical proficiency and scale. Compensation: If you are strictly egalitarian, then stop reading, you will love it. Otherwise, you might be like me and believe that different people, performing at different levels as evident by their quantifiable evaluations, ought to be compensated differently. Stated another way, if you believe that the person at the very top of the class and the person on the verge of being terminated for performance issues should receive the same base and bonus amounts each year, then Triage would be a perfect fit for you. Musings aside, total compensation at Triage (both base and bonuses) varies exclusively based upon tenure. There are no exceptions made for this rule. You can be the brightest star or the laziest bum, and so long as you started on the same date, you will be paid the same. Triage maintains that it is a "meritocracy" in that promotions to Senior and Manager are based upon merit, and while this is true, a meritocracy that only provides two distinct points in 10 years to differentiate from your peers in terms of compensation based recognition is hardly what you would call dynamic (especially considering that over 80% of associates make Senior and less than 10% of Seniors make Manager). This may sound a touch like a rant, but think long and hard about whether or not this will bother you long term before you make a decision. I didn't think it would matter to me, but it can definitely wear on your morale, sap your motivation, and if left unchecked, diminish inherent desire to achieve (something I feared very deeply in the months leading up to my decision to leave).

    Advice to Management

    1. Take advantage of your employees strengths and diversify employee roles in a meaningful way. Keeping everyone on the exact same track through the first 21 months is likely wise in that it exposes everyone to everything and gives them a chance to identify what they may love / excel at that they wouldn't have otherwise realized. However, there comes a point when some degree of specialization (beyond simply joining a squad that you spend 2% of your time on) is good for both morale and for the bottom line. If you have people passionate about technical progress, building new tool, and driving innovations, then let the builders build, don't stifle innovation by failing to utilize this potentially powerful asset. If you have people passionate about recruiting, then let then act as your ambassadors, don't simply force whomever is on the team closest to the university to act as your recruiters. If you have people passionate about building a fun social culture, equip them with the resources to host great events. 2. Made good on the promise of "meritocracy." I can support keeping everyone's base salaries the same within windows of tenure, but in terms of end of year bonuses, reward people individually for their accomplishments that year. The resultant morale boost and motivation to drive value day in and day out will more than pay off any additional investment you are making in your labor expenses. If someone in the bottom 25% is so offended by not receiving a bonus that they decide to leave, then maybe they weren't a great fit in the first place. 3. Innovate. In my nearly 3.5 years at the firm, I saw zero truly game-changing innovations fully brought to fruition. There were several out there that if supported by upper management may have emerged as one, but they were squashed by a downward pressure to focus on exclusively on core project work.


  9. Helpful (3)

    Great company -- work experience, leadership opportunity, and balanced lifestyle in a fun environment.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Current Employee - Senior Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Triage Consulting Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    I see what some comments say about the daily work being a "con", but I encourage people to think bigger picture. There is time on the phone and tedious parts of the day, but you get so much more than just phone skills you can use to negotiating your cable bill. You get: leadership roles as early as 21 months, exposure to C-level hospital clients, exposure to internal management, "extracurricular" event planning and involvement if you want, and extensive formal and informal training giving young college grads real life business experience. The compensation package as a whole (salary + benefits + VTO + PTO...) is fair and there are opportunities for increases and bonuses at certain milestones. I think that anyone who leaves Triage (especially early on) because they don't like the work will find that most jobs have parts that are more and less desirable. Once you factor in the people you work with, the environment both here in the office and on the road, and the mentoring and support, and the value we add to the hospitals we work for, the reasons for working at Triage outweigh the reasons not to -- especially if you keep your focus on the big picture.

    Cons

    I think Triage's conservative nature causes it to be a bit reactionary to avoidable issues (shortage of office space, shortage of staff). I know that budgeting and risk assessments go into these decisions but it would be reassuring to see a more proactive attitude about some of the problems that we see year after year.


  10. Helpful (5)

    Stagnant and cookie-cutter

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Triage Consulting Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    *Good work-life balance and low-stress if those are your priorities *Looks good on a resume *PTO/benefits

    Cons

    Diversity is a genuine problem. The fact that a significant number of people have expressed concerns about an exclusionary culture, but someone more tenured posted a review undermining those personal experiences, is telling of the general company culture at Triage. Diversity is a widespread complaint behind closed doors for many people who don't fit the limited Triage stereotype. The demographic seems to be 80% white and many employees coming from Greek life, which is partly why reviews are so divided between "College part 2! Love the people!" vs. "meh." Work culture aside, the day-to-day is procedural and repetitive. You do learn a lot of knowledge within the first couple months, but it is within a small sliver of the healthcare industry. If you are genuinely interested in account research, calling insurance reps, claims and billing, and contract language, then you might enjoy the work. However, this is definitely not a management consulting/strategy role no matter how much Triage tries to brand it as such. Evaluations and recruitment can be laughable and not professional. This is less of a problem higher up with Managers and Principals, but I have heard Associates (22-23 year olds) write candidates off at career fairs for having a foreign accent, subjectively not liking them, or giving them chances because they were physically attractive. This lack of professionalism and value system would never be accepted at most companies I know of, and it is unfortunate that the environment tends to allow and foster this type of behavior. For evaluations, many employees feel that politics/personality fit outweigh merit and productivity.

    Advice to Management

    Transparency during the recruiting process, as well as lowering the bar in terms of candidate caliber, might aid in employee retention and happiness. Higher-performing employees leave fast because there are so many administrative tasks in the job that do not require education from a top-tier school.


  11. Helpful (2)

    Excellent place to work. Great people, experience, and work-life balance.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Senior Associate in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Triage Consulting Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Culture: Triage has an exceptional work environment. My colleagues were hard-working, fun, and extremely supportive. They have been able to maintain a very collaborative culture and emphasize strong work-life balance. A 45-55 hour workweek can be expected regardless of what level you reach at the company. Professional Development: Triage invests heavily in its employees from a training/professional development standpoint. Furthermore, you get great management/client-facing experience at a very young age. Very few companies will let you manage multi-million dollar engagements between the ages of 23-25. The project management and staff development experience is extremely valuable. Network: The Triage network is very tight-knit. You will get to know a very vibrant, diverse group of people who will go on to be successful in a hundred different ways, both inside and outside of healthcare. Triage is a great place to build a career, and can also be a great steppingstone for whatever else you'd like to get into outside of healthcare finance.

    Cons

    Mundane work: Triage's breadth of services is fairly narrow, and can be very mundane. If you don't enjoy the work, it can be a grind sometimes and the learning curve can level-off for long stretches between promotions. No pay for performance: Triage's promotion track, salaries, and bonuses are all static - at present, there is no mechanism in place to financially reward company superstars. They do not incentivize people to excel which makes it difficult for their most talented people to stay.

    Advice to Management

    For the most part, well done - keep doing what you're doing. My one piece of advice would be to work on some sort of merit-based compensation. Whether that's increased bonuses, accelerated promotion tracks, or being more willing to allow really talented people to take their careers within Triage in an alternative direction where they could really drive a lot of value (e.g., technical applications, Legal Services, practice development, etc). I think it may go a long way towards motivating staff and keeping morale high as people would really feel like they are rewarded for going above and beyond.



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