TruGreen

  www.trugreen.com
  www.trugreen.com

TruGreen Reviews

Updated December 17, 2014
Updated December 17, 2014
297 Reviews
2.7
297 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
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David Alexander
44 Ratings

Review Highlights

Pros
  • Good pay with bonuses for hitting targets (in 14 reviews)

  • Base pay is good, The supervisors do the best they can and they know a lot (in 13 reviews)


Cons
  • Long hours and generally 6 day work weeks so be prepared to work a lot (in 31 reviews)

  • It's stressful going door-to-door (in 14 reviews)

More Highlights

Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    Not a horrible company to work for

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Tree and Shrub Specialist
    Former Employee - Tree and Shrub Specialist

    I worked at TruGreen full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    It's nice that they offer medical, dental and vision benefits, even though they cost a lot. Most of my fellow employees were very nice and helpful.

    Cons

    The pay is low in comparison to the demands of the job. It is hard manual labor, long hours and usually 6 days a week. The customers can be an absolute nightmare to work with, and management is always demanding more of you. I would recommend this job to a friend only if they were desperate for work and didn't have young children at home.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Follow through and communication are the two biggest problems with this company. When you say you are going to do something than do it. If you say you are not going to do something (like make employees work a mandatory Saturday) then do not then change your mind on Thursday when people have made other plans and also have to scramble to find a sitter. Positive feedback as well as constructive criticism would be welcome as a new employee. I never knew if I was doing a good job, an ok job or a crappy job because I never got any feedback. And when I did handle a difficult customer well or fixed a problem a brief "good job" would have gone really far for moral and probably improved my work quality and output.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Hard working but feel good at the end of the day

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at TruGreen

    Pros

    work on your own and get to control your days

    Cons

    you have to work in any weather and sometimes have to deal with customers that you wont like

  3.  

    Challenging and very useful.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at TruGreen full-time

    Pros

    Seeing results of your work
    Being outside

    Cons

    Upper management thumb on your back

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Let branches pick what to put on customers lawn in their situation rather then someone from another area saying whatbshould be done.

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  5.  

    You won't last Long

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Outside Sales Representative in Myrtle Beach, SC
    Former Employee - Outside Sales Representative in Myrtle Beach, SC

    I worked at TruGreen full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    Base pay of 20k per year

    Cons

    Mico managing including GPS tracking. You get questioned even if you break route just to go to the bathroom. Sales are good for a few months, but they make the qouto impossible to meet by mid summer and let the entire sales team go every year

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Loosen up on the micromanaging and make quota achievable when the season slows down

  6. 5 people found this helpful  

    Long hours, shrinking pay

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Residential Sales Representative in Minneapolis, MN
    Former Employee - Residential Sales Representative in Minneapolis, MN

    I worked at TruGreen full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    The pay structure they offer when hiring people in the spring pays well.

    Before the call centers were introduced, the local branches had individual offices and felt connected to the community. Really, it felt like a family more than a business. It was a wonderful place to work in the late 90's-early 00's. The pay was great, the people were friendly. The managers knew you as a person, not a number. There were company picnics and pot lucks, baby showers and table tennis. I have very fond memories of the company in those days.

    In most states the employees get a seasonal layoff (which you will need if you work for them).

    As door-to-door became a bigger focus, I was surprised to see the tenured sales people (who had little experience other than fighting for inbound calls) be forced to prove if they could sell. Many d-2-d sales people had felt resentful about that, so it was nice to see management recognize the disparity.

    Cons

    TruGreen went full corporate in the mid 00's. At that point, the focus became to find ways to change the commission structure in late spring in order to increase profitability for the branch for the rest of the year. Incentive-based pay became first on the chopping block (not the manager's pay, of course).

    Back-end commissions (you had already earned months before) vanished as the company forfeited them in the new commission structures.

    Suddenly you had to sell 30% more just to reach the first commission level. Not that it mattered, the weekly new full-program customer goals were always 20% higher than the year before.

    You would finding yourself working 1130-9 Monday to Friday and 9-4 on Saturdays (the entire late spring and summer) chasing a new almost impossible sales goal. Even worse, when your reached your individual commission goal you had to stay/come in on Saturdays if the "team" was behind.

    The same happened, to a lesser extent, with the techs.... who every year had slightly larger routes and longer days.

    Having worked at several branches, it is pretty much a given that at Tru-Green the sales manager will fraternize with certain sales people and these are the people who get promotions and spiffs. Personal politics often matters more than performance.

    There is also a look-the-other-way attitude by branch managers when managers of various sections (sales, office, production) cross the line in the way they speak to their employees. Screaming sales managers are unfortunately a very common thing. Now that I think about it, almost all of the most inappropriate things (sexual or otherwise) I've ever heard in a work environment was said by a sales manager at Tru-Green. Other parts of the branches were more integrated, but in my experience the sales rooms were places where jokes about female and gay employees were tolerated (if not outright encouraged).

     Branch managers also can have some odd rules (such as salesmen having to wear pants and buttoned up shirts in 100+ degree heat) or not allowing someone to sign up for service unless they prepay for everything up front.

    Upper management (above the branch level) spends too much time meeting with other managers and very little time actually doing anything (other than coming up with new ways to cut incentive pay). Well, I'll give them a little credit: they also spent time cooking up new sales training modules . . . problem was, the new sales methods (STAR reps, etc) were cooked up by people who knew nothing about selling. It was nothing but wasted time and money (that could have been left in employee pockets).

    In recent years, sales goals would be met occasionally but even then there never was enough technicians/trucks to do the work. There would be aeration-overseedings still being done when snow was in the forecast. Free service calls to customers would be a week late (well after the guaranteed 48 hour turn around time).

    It is common to have customers that have cancelled not actually be counted on the books. (Local managers control the books with basically no auditing by an independent source. Sandbagging sales is common.) Uncancelled cancelled customers can cause problems since any day it rains you will be calling people in endless computer-programmed phone campaigns.

    Of course, if the branch gets fined for violating the do-not-call list, the employee gets scapegoated.

    It's a shame because the company wasn't broken when it became part of Service-Master, yet management and bean-counters found a way to turn the company into a well-oiled national corporation that is disconnected from the places they serve and the people who work there.

    A textbook study in how stockholders, executives and management can destroy a company.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    #1) Ditch the call centers. People don't want to talk to someone 2000 miles away. People want to talk to someone who knows how the weather has been and can come look at their yard.

    Also, call center employees stole a large number of sales from employees at the last branch I worked at. It was very frustrating to call someone back that you knocked at a door to talk to, only to find corporate had signed them up and you got no credit for it!

    #2) Stop with the ridiculous production/sales goals. It's the managers at the branch who communicate the message, it is upper management who sets the goals. If the company has never increased its business more than 3% in a month year-to-year, does it make sense to set goals 20% higher (than the year before) every summer?

    #3) If you are going to make your employees work six days a week, then you should have to work on Saturdays as well. No one should have to work more than 48 hours in a week without any OT pay.

    #4) The company has slowly been losing market share due to the way you monkey around with employee pay. Was it worth making first quarter goals in 2007 to now have the company slowly disintegrating due to workforce attrition and over-aggressive sales tactics?

    #5) Allow your experienced sales people to pick their own territories instead of office politics dictating who gets to sell where.

    #6) if you hire someone at a certain pay level, then don't pull the rug out from under their feet four months later. It's an insult to the employee to say they aren't worth as much as they used to be.

    #7) If you must cut someone's pay, you should understand regular people have budgets and it is not fair to take away someone's back end commission they have already earned.

    That pay should be grandfathered in. (I don't know if that is legal or not, but it is highly unethical to take back those earnings.)

    #8) Don't call the customers 20 times a year. A lot of people cancel because the company is so endlessly persistent.

    #9) The order of seasonal layoffs should be based on merit, not politics.

    #10) It should be made crystal clear that any manager caught screaming, swearing, harassing or insulting employees should be demoted/fired. If it were my business: all sound in the sales room, front office and smoking area would be monitored.

    #11) Some customers get freebies year after year with baseless complaints . . . they abuse the system and hog resources and yet are rewarded year after year with free services when they call/e-mail upper management. These people are NOT profitable to the company and should be screened out.

    #12) Allow the local sales people the ability to offer the same deals that the call center people do!!! It's absolutely unfair to have non-local people undercut you and steal your sale. (Or even worse, having the customer Google a coupon while you are at their door and then the customer opting to call in to get the cheaper price even though you did all the work..)

    #13) This will never happen, but I would fire all the levels of management between the executives and the area managers. They are a massive drain on the company and are not worth the amount of money being spent on them. If the CEO were reading this, I'd ask him/her what do these people actually produce? Do they have any purpose other than nagging those below them and cooking up half-baked training modules?

    Is there really so much innovation and change in this industry that it requires a massive executive presence? Millions are spent on their payroll, is it actually worth it?

    #14) There should be a certified horticulturalist at every branch.

    #15) Route all service calls to the branch and have the local office personnel handle them. Calling a 1-800 number for a service call is not as efficient as calling someone who can go look in the driver's bin and leave a note on the production manager's door. The ever-increasing delay in service call completion is directly connected to the gutting of the local branch offices.

    #16) Most of the people I worked with were wonderful intelligent people with big hearts and a connection to the place we lived and worked. The damage done by the corporate restructuring was devastating. The past damage cannot be undone, but maybe the company can create another nurturing well-paying environment and try to get back to what made the company so great back in the day.

    More likely, if any executive actually did read this and felt spurred to do something about it, the result would be another misguided waste-of-man-hours training module.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  7.  

    Good pay but too focused on numbers and disorganized

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Lawn Specialist
    Current Employee - Lawn Specialist

    I have been working at TruGreen full-time

    Pros

    The pay is pretty good, better than most places for those without a college degree.
    Minimal supervision (usually)

    Cons

    Senior staff too worried about $ numbers, which leads to poor customer service strategies.
    Products used at the wrong time of year so by July a green lawn is yellow and covered in weeds.
    Lots of mixed messages from corporate level supervisors.
    Supervisors dont listen to field technicians (they have a "who cares, just go fix it" attitude)
    HORRIBLE customer service department and scheduling (for both technicians and customers)
    Customer survey system is seriously retarded. Everyone knows it sucks but nothing is done to fix it and technicians are blamed.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop worrying so much about sales and quotas. If we take our time treating each individual lawn we can greatly impact how our customers feel, and their neighbors as well. This will automatically lead to greater customer retention and sales without hardly any effort. This also means we need to use our products more effectively, and stop cheating customers out of the service they expect (ex. We use pre-emergent that last 6 weeks on a lawn, so by July crab grass, dandies, and other weeds come back full force. This is blamed on the technicians, which is ridiculous because we have no control of when products are applied unless we use something without telling anyone. Corporate needs to take responsibility!).
    Part of this is efficiency and effectiveness of our products. The way they tell us to mix and use our products would literally take a semi trailer full of tanks and backpacks with all sorts of different products. Stupid! Give me a single product to kill weeds that will give me the ability to resolve my customers' issues with one stop!

    The Tree & Shrub service is a joke if I ever saw one. Not only does it not work but I have seen "senior" technicians use the same product (containing 2-3 insecticides and fungicides) and spray people's houses with it for foundation bug control instead of using a backpack. Would you want your house sprayed with those chemicals to the point of being soaked? Didn't think so.

    I'm going to milk the cow for what its worth but doubt I will return next season unless I really need the money.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  8.  

    TruGreen

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at TruGreen

    Pros

    Good field training with follow up visits from the manager.

    Cons

    Ridiculously long hours, over 50 per week.

    Doesn't Recommend
  9. 1 person found this helpful  

    Terrible employer

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - CRS in Youngstown, OH
    Current Employee - CRS in Youngstown, OH

    I have been working at TruGreen full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    None. ..if you're thinking about applying, don't. Your doing yourself a favor.

    Cons

    Terrible management, unrealistic expectations and lack of disclosure on almost everything. They spend more time hiding things than actually just telling you what you need to know. Zero training, and they allow people to talk to you however they see fit. Not a good environment. Pass if you can

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Fire them all and start over

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  10. 1 person found this helpful  

    Could be a good place to work if management was replaced

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Sales Representative in Mobile, AL
    Former Employee - Sales Representative in Mobile, AL

    I worked at TruGreen full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Customers, hours, days, potential commission

    Cons

    lack of training, rate of pay, commission scale, and most of all MICRO MANAGEMENT

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
  11. 1 person found this helpful  

    Sat around making cold calls for the entire day. Huge turnover rate and a lot of senior staff that only cares about numb

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Sales Representative in Denver, CO
    Current Employee - Sales Representative in Denver, CO

    I have been working at TruGreen full-time (less than an year)

    Pros

    If you can hit your goals the pay is pretty decent. The other employees are pretty cool and fun to hang around

    Cons

    you have to start out working the bad hours and can only move to the better ones through good sales. The company has no ethics

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Just help the staff more

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

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