US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

www.nrc.gov

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Reviews

Updated December 19, 2014
Updated December 19, 2014
29 Reviews
3.8
29 Reviews
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US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Allison M. Macfarlane
Allison M. Macfarlane
5 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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  1.  

    Comfortable government job

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Lead Secretary in Rockville, MD
    Former Employee - Lead Secretary in Rockville, MD

    I worked at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Stable, competitive pay and benefits, great co-workers and pretty laid back work environment

    Cons

    Slow seasons like summer can be brutal, staff uses their accumulated vacation pay to pretty much take the entire summer off, its is slow. Not very challenging work and little to no room for creativity.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Taking a lot of time off affects the the entire team.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    I worked as a Student Engineer (summer intern)

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    Former Employee - Summer Student Engineer in Rockville, MD
    Former Employee - Summer Student Engineer in Rockville, MD

    I worked at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    Pros

    The pay is great for an intern and I became a big fan of the flex/credit hours.
    My supervisor sent me to a training class to learn about nuclear reactors and the regulation process - very interesting!
    I gained a lot of "life skills," such as learning responsibility, how to use public transportation, how to dress for office environment, etc.

    Cons

    My office ran out of things for me to do about half-way through the internship, so I spent a lot of time browsing the intranet reading up on NRC history, past nuclear disasters, etc.

  3.  

    Quality of Experience Depends On Office

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Worked with some really great people. Overall the work was generally interesting.

    Cons

    And worked with some really bad people. While the agency didn't have high turnover, my office did, with four different supervisors in less than 3 years.

    Doesn't Recommend
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  5. 2 people found this helpful  

    Resident Inspector

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Resident Inspector
    Current Employee - Resident Inspector

    I have been working at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    Good pay with a 40 hour work week. There's some amount of stress in my job, but that's because I'm an above average employee and volunteer as things that come up.

    Most folks who work at the NRC have zero stress and enjoy a solid middle class salary with no fear of being laid off. Obviously, no one is getting rich working for the government (unless you're an independent contractor), but the pay isn't bad and at least the government isn't going to kick you to the street when the economy sours.

    Cons

    Management varies widely depending on which office you work in. Region II (Altanta, GA) is highly political, but other regions seem better. Management in Region II does not want to do their job and fire bad apples as this requires higher levels of approval and thus makes them look bad for hiring the person in the first place.

    Being a federal agency, they are required to give veterans preference for internal job postings. This means that 90-95% of upper management is ex-navy. Basically, if you are not ex-military and want to succeed and get promoted, there is little chance of becoming a division manager or higher. There are some female division level managers without navy experience, but this is needed to offset the mostly male ex-navy managers.

    It is possible to become a branch chief (in charge of 10-15 people), but it will take years longer versus being ex-navy. If you aren't ex-navy and want to move up as much as possible, it is very true what the other folks say about needing an engineering degree. I think there's a definite bias toward promoting engineers, as there should be since the work can be technical. There's no escaping the importance of being able to understand technical issues, as this is crucial in being a good regulator.

    There is truly no upside in working for the government once you've been there a few years and reach full performance grade. Sometimes I wish I'd have stayed in the private sector, but I would have been laid off in the last downturn. However, there I'd have to prove myself without being a veteran, and have the full potential to move up according to my work output, people/networking skills and intelligence.

    Lastly, the biggest drawback to federal employment is our dysfunctional elected government officials who are ultimately in-charge. It seems now days we are nothing but pawns to them. Value wise, it is easy to see my salary gives me less purchasing power than I had 6 years ago, but it seems our government will not give cost of living increases.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Talking without any actions is viewed as pointless by a lot of folks. If you truly believe in your work force, why not let them do their job without push back from management.

    It would be nice if there was a way to monetarily reward hard workers only, but it seems this is unlikely to happen. I know there is a huge work load difference between my job and others in the region, but year after year I see folks that work less than I do get the same performance awards I receive.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  6.  

    Meaningful and fulfilling work supporting public health and safety

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Reactor Engineer in Rockville, MD
    Current Employee - Senior Reactor Engineer in Rockville, MD

    I have been working at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    Great agency with a meaningful mission. Staying technical still provides advancement opportunities. Preaches and practices an open and collaborative work environment. Work balance opportunities are excellent.

    Cons

    Staff management is in flux due to retirement of seasoned regulators.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  7.  

    Good development for fresh grads, poor at honing technical skills

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Project Engineer
    Former Employee - Project Engineer

    I worked at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Its training program is very good at development young graduates and its flexible scheduling is excellent at having a good life and work balance. Since it is government, it has amenities like onsite child care and metro reimbursement.

    Cons

    Unfortunately, many women who are promoted quickly are those without relationship or family. It speaks volume about getting to the top and the sacrifices these executives takes. There are female leaders of course, they are likely to sit at same managing position for years and years. And many new hires are older folks who would like just to do their jobs and retire instead of teaching principles and ideas to younger generation.

  8.  

    good summer intern experience with a lot of training.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Summer Student Engineer in Rockville, MD
    Former Employee - Summer Student Engineer in Rockville, MD

    I worked at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    very stable government agency.they also worked to train new employees and interns.

    Cons

    at times the day would be a little slow and not very exciting.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    make sure that if an intern is coming to the company, that there is a fully laid out plan and projects for the interns to accomplish

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  9. 1 person found this helpful  

    Hypocritical of what they say they are

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Electronics Engineer in Rockville, MD
    Current Employee - Senior Electronics Engineer in Rockville, MD

    I have been working at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    The general idea of a regulating agency with a requirements structure with the sole purpose of maintaining the safety, health and well being of the public with experts in their field leading the way sounds like an noble and necessary service by the government.
    They set out to to that with excellent benefits and a reasonable pay structure.

    Cons

    Trying to do things right. It is not a technology or engineering based company. Decisions are made by management and their own priorities, whatever those are. And yes things should be rejected or denied for simple common sense reasons that do not require a Phd to identify. There is some validity to the nickname "Nuclear Rubberstamp Commission"

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Let the staff do their jobs. At least let them review the licensee submittals first and let them provide their recommendations. Constant manipulation of the staff on a daily basis to get them to accept your priorities, whatever they are, limits the staff effectiveness significantly. In fact you could use administrative aids much more if you don't want the advice of senior technical staff. The use of retaliatory measures to staff that do not agree with you is obvious and common place. It is like beaning in baseball - it is a fact of life that no one talks about.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  10. 1 person found this helpful  

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission is a very good place to work.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Program Analyst in Rockville, MD
    Former Employee - Program Analyst in Rockville, MD

    I worked at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    The work life is great because you can use telecommuting or a number of other work schedules that fit into the employees specific needs. The pay is really really good.

    Cons

    It is a unique challenge working as a regulator. Most of what is done requires specific rules and regulations. Also, it is a very regimented environment because many of the managers are from the military.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  11.  

    Good place to gain experience with regulatory field.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Summer Student Scientist in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Summer Student Scientist in Washington, DC

    I worked at US Nuclear Regulatory Commission as an intern (less than an year)

    Pros

    Excellent exposure to nuclear regulatory work and licensing enforcement.

    Cons

    Having to ride the shuttle to different buildings may consume time.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

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