Ubisoft Reviews

Updated March 25, 2015
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3.5
302 Reviews
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Ubisoft Cofondateur et Président-Directeur Général Yves Guillemot
Yves Guillemot
181 Ratings

Pros
  • good work-life balance, and it is difficult to find others (in 17 reviews)

  • Casual work environment; everything gets done over coffee (in 20 reviews)

Cons
  • If you don't speak French, your pay scale is different (in 7 reviews)

  • de la haute direction prend des ann (in 6 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

Employee Reviews

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  1. Great, innovative company to work for!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Singapore (Singapore)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Singapore (Singapore)

    I have been working at Ubisoft full-time

    Pros

    -High profile and motivating projects
    -Very nice people and working environment
    -Opportunity to work with stars from the industry and grow one's expertise
    -Opportunity to work in a truly multicultural environment and learn from that
    -Company truly cares about its employees
    -Fun to work there, very cool company culture!

    Cons

    -need more sharing sessions from the Senior staff
    -industry is still young locally
    -more parties!

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    -Keep innovating!
    -Organize more teambuildings/ get-together

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
  2. Online Programmer

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Contractor - Online Programmer
    Current Contractor - Online Programmer

    I have been working at Ubisoft as a contractor (more than a year)

    Pros

    Their systems, ideas, innovations, and the concepts of creating and inventing games are incredibly amazing. You are also not restricted to get the "tight time" to work as your shift time. You can get the leisure times whilst working as long as you can finish the task within its deadline and properly finished. The coworkers are nice and we all do love gaming and we enjoy creating games!

    Cons

    The challenges are vary from each role to another role. My challenge is: to help this company having the most competent online gaming experiences and reliable in gaming industry, especially in its Online Service. You have to work hard to make it happen, though. The challenge is in yourself - whether you want to work hard or be lazy.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    I'm satisfied with our company's system.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  3. Bien

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Ubisoft

    Pros

    Ambiance agréable et beaucoup d'avantages sociaux, rémunération convenable et acceptable, primes méritées, services gratuits tel que la garderie et le médecin

    Cons

    Heures supp mal payées, stress, contrats très précaires, pas de sentiment d'appartenance quand les contrats sont aussi courts et précaires

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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  5. 5 people found this helpful

    Fancy a Career in Politics? Join Ubisoft Singapore NOW!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Ubisoft full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    You can be assured that when you quit within the first six months, you would have had the world's best crash course in politics. More than that, we offer you the chance to work horrendous hours (past midnight for 8 months at a time), for poor pay and no bonuses*.

    Ubisoft Singapore - Training Presidential Candidates from Around the World.

    *There are no bonuses at Ubisoft. No performance bonus. Not even a thirteenth month. Employees are given "profit sharing" which is dependent on the performance of the game that they work on after it is released. Working on an online game? Expect nothing until it actually becomes profitable. Even when it DOES become profitable, you can probably expect about an average of half a month's pay at best (average salary at Ubisoft is typically horrendous as well). Additionally, please note that this is only paid out the FOLLOWING year. This is a tactic to encourage "employee retention". Yes, employee retention at Ubisoft Singapore is so horrendous that they have had to resolve to withholding employee's (half a month's pay) share of profits for a whole year just to get them to stay.

    Cons

    I'm going to be painfully honest in this review.
    I worked at Ubisoft Singapore as a senior manager for a lengthy amount of time. When I first joined I was enthused to be part of the largest AAA studio in Singapore. I looked forward to great job experience and opportunities. I was sorely disappointed.

    The Ubisoft Studio in Singapore is plagued by several huge issues that have taken senior management years to acknowledge (and are still unresolved). I will list them briefly and then elaborate with examples below.
    1. A performance review system that encourages politics and backstabbing
    2. A lack of proper recognition for performance (as a result of 1)
    3. An ineffective HR department and complete lack of HR support for employees
    4. A predominantly French culture that discriminates blatantly against non-French speakers

    I will illustrate points 1 to 3 with the following explanation and example:
    The performance review system at Ubisoft is based on a bell curve - which is fine (many companies follow this model). You are given a grade based on your performance which decides your position on the curve. The problem with this is that your grade is NOT decided by any measurable KPI.

    In fact, most Ubisoft employees have no job descriptions and no KPIs whatsoever. Let me repeat that for you - most employees at Ubisoft Singapore come to work each day with no formal definition of their job. They come to work each day, and sign a blank cheque to do whatever task is given to them whether legitimately part of their job scope or not because there is NO formal job scope. Putting aside the obvious possibility for abuse (I had a colleague who was a project manager who was doing overtime past midnight on a regular basis everyday for 8 months. He ended up spending a significant amount of his time doing pointless tasks such as switching on, moving around, and updating "production televisions" which arguably had nothing to do with his actual job function of managing the project).

    Another of my colleagues got his job description and personal KPIs only 8 months into the job. They became irrelevant within 3 months and he never was given any new KPIs thereafter until he left the company. When he requested for his Job Description and KPIs from his superior, she flatly refused (she was French and hence senior management closed an eye and let it happen). When he went to HR to ask for KPIs, HR told him that "his manager had refused to give him any KPIs and therefore there was nothing that they could do".

    With no f formal measurables for work and contributions, you will have zero chance of having a fair review at the end of each cycle. This will impact your career advancement, profit sharing (no bonuses are given at Ubisoft), and pay increase (which is often meagre at best).

    How then is performance at the Singapore studio measured? It is decided by a group of "power-players" inside a closed door session. Many of these individuals you may not have worked with before. This lack of any proper KPI system for measuring and review performance encourages employees to spend their time cosy-ing up to those who will ultimately have an impact on their review. Often this comes at the expense of their actual work - which is then passed around to others. This leads to an environment of politicking and backstabbing in order to "climb" the review curve at the expense of others. The general philosophy at the company is: "Why do my work? Pass the buck so it can encumber my competitors, that way I free up more time to score a better grade for myself".

    Throw team work and culture out the window. Everyone at Ubisoft Singapore is a veritable political Bismarck (or should I say Robespierre in honor of their French culture?).

    The HR department at the Singapore studio is toothless because they report to the very same individuals who hold sway over the review system. They themselves are on the bell curve. If you go to HR with a human resource problem, you can be assured that anything short of sexual harassment will be swiftly swept under the carpet because they do not want to offend anyone. This is illustrated by the same example above.

    The HR department consists of less than 5 individuals at any one time looking after a studio of around 300 people. Unrealistic at best. The main purpose of the HR department at the Singapore Studio is to function as the propaganda department for senior management. They toe the line and keep the metaphorical "sheep" within the fences. They do not effect change. They do not support employees. They support management and keep employees in check. Any employees who do not toe the line are swiftly "managed out" (unless they are French).

    4. A predominantly French culture that discriminates blatantly against non-French speakers
    Are you an Asian who wishes to polish up on your French speaking abilties?
    Then I strongly encourage you to join the Singapore studio of Ubisoft.
    You will have French spoken around you constantly at meetings and at your desk. The Singapore studio has a large and very overbearing French population. Informal work conversations are conducted in French. Formal work conversations are ALSO conducted in French - especially when the French are hoping to exclude anyone else in the room. It's a handy trick when you are the dominant race in the studio (and visibly supported by management and HR).

    To put things in perspective - Ubisoft HQ has recently mandated that all official presentations at the senior management level MUST be conducted in French. Don't speak French? Kiss your hopes of any career advancement goodbye.

    Not only is French as a language an issue. If you are not a French speaker in the studio, you will be actively discriminated against. The poor guy I mentioned above who did overtime being the informal TV IT dude? He was local. He had a french-speaking fellow project manager who joined around the same time and at the same level that he did. The french speaker was given two consecutive AEs (Above Expectations - the highest possible review grade) in the time that they worked together. Everyone else, including the poor "TV Project Manager dude" above, were given "Pass" grades. The French speaker hardly did any overtime. At 7pm sharp everyday you will suddenly hear less French in the office as most of the French leave on time, leaving the dirty work to everyone else. If you are not French, expect to work late on a regular basis (post midnight), poor pay and poor career advancement.

    All of the above has been regularly brought up with HR and senior management. Nothing has been done. The people who have raised these issues have either been "managed out", left in frustration, or are thinking of leaving.

    My sincere advice to you is to think thrice before deciding to work here. If you do not speak French, it is a dead end career move.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    The studio was vibrant and had a great culture for a period of time, especially on GRP.
    1. Revamp your review system to encourage fairness and transparency.
    2. Get a proper HR department.
    3. Be fair in your review system and you'll find your capable employees stepping up while the duds will be exposed. At the moment, every thing is being decided on what language people speak and which political "clique" they belong to. This is a dead end long term strategy that can only lead to the studio going downhill as talent drains out of the company while the poor performers stay and continue to leech company resources.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  6. 3 people found this helpful

    Disappointed.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Developer in Bucharest (Romania)
    Current Employee - Developer in Bucharest (Romania)

    I have been working at Ubisoft full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    I work in the production department. Decent benefits, good atmosphere for lollygagging and collecting a paycheck while doing a minimal amount of work. If you want a secure stress-free job without having to work too hard then this is the place for you. You don't even have to make up excuses why your progress is slow, because most of the time will be spent on waiting on other people to complete your work. Even now as I type this, there is a guy that is playing Diablo III and has been doing that every day, all day for at least 4 months back. Of the times I've passed by his desk on my way to the bathroom I've seen him either playing D3, or sleeping (Diablo 3 is hard work, that poor soul). Once or twice he had a spreadsheet or word doc open. If you wanna be like that guy, come work at Ubisoft you'll fit right in.

    The people I work with provide an above average social experience at the office.

    Cons

    Pay and advancement: There are a lot of little cons depending on what you are looking for. First it's the salary. They will never pay you more than you're worth. Some of the people I work with are very good at what they do and they aren't getting what they are worth. Advancement is also very hard. You would have to be twice as competent than you would need to be moved up to the next rank, for example junior to regular. It seems that Ubisoft is capitalizing on their name on your resume, and they will use that to pay you less. Looking around I don't see anyone over 30. There are a lot of young ones, so what happened to all the veterans? They probably packed up and left after they realized the same old "carrot on a stick" story wasn't going to pan out. This company just isn't the best place to be at if you're looking to climb the corporate ladder. You would have to be good at politics and be friends with the ones making the decisions. Merit alone is not enough.

    Ambient noise: Ubisoft loves open environments. If you're trying to program and you don't like noise, this isn't the place for you. You could put on some headphones and blast music to cover the chaotic noise and hear something more orderly, but is that really a solution?

    Bureaucracy: Nearly every project we undertook went *way* over the deadline due to constant unnecessary communication between different departments. I've had projects I've worked very hard on then got canceled at the last minute because they took too long. The server and network security specialize in dragging out opening a simple firewall rule (which should have been there in the first place) into a 2 week long ordeal. Combine that with HR's reluctancy to promote and increase salary and they have a very good excuse as to why they will not give you a raise. They will tell you "well you haven't really done anything important here yet" You're doing the best you can, but others don't respond to your emails, or doing their job and you end taking more and more tasks to fill up your time and then you end up in a situation where you're constantly juggling complex tasks. If you're a programmer or you actually get some satisfaction out of getting things done, this is a recipe for unproductivity and/or frustration.

    Pointless meetings: Every week we have at least 2 meetings in which topics are discussed which do not affect me or my work. They will fill your head with useless information that distracts you from your current work.

    Lack of control: Combine the above negatives and realize that the company is too big to listen to one little ant complaining. Change will not come easily if at all. No one actually cares if you are happy and productive (a good thing if you don't care either). If you're like me and you want to grow and make a difference, this isn't a good, long term opportunity.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    I don't expect management to listen, but here goes:

    1. Cut down on bureaucracy and unnecessary communication. Small businesses do more work in a week than one department in Ubisoft gets done in a month. The company should be structured so that departments and teams can make trivial to moderate decisions more independently. This also means trusting leads more and providing them with a direction in which to go.

    The pay and other cons, I don't have anything to say... If the fool will not quit his job, why pay him more? More pay doesn't lead to more productive employees, it just lead to employees that won't quit when everything else besides pay is a problem.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  7. 1 person found this helpful

    Great Environment for those who want to make a difference!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Singapore (Singapore)
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Singapore (Singapore)

    I have been working at Ubisoft

    Pros

    Open environment - Really helps on communication. Just take the initiative, anyone from senior management to junior employees are always willing to talk.

    Great Business Mind - Talk to more people who manages projects, department(s) and studio. You will pick up more knowledge about the company and business direction. The future of the organisation is bright in this competitive industry. There are many senior guys whose first job start in this company. That explains!

    Knowledge sharing - A lot of time, effort and money is spent in development of knowledge and training of the employees. There are many workshops created developed especially in the last few years. Values a lot on sharing expert advice (internally and externally). Not many games developers are doing to this extend!

    Local Talent Development - The Singapore studio emphasis the importance of developing top local talent. That's a very good area to develop and strongly encouraged!

    Cons

    Works with multiple studios collaboration. A lot of functions works with various studios and offices. Can be challenging when it comes to time zone collaboration. Which MNC has no challenge on this? However, it is also good that every studio is learning from one another yet growing the expertise knowledge at the same time.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be a bigger risk taker and adventurous. Continue to develop the local talent. They could be your next Technical Director or Creative Director for Assassin's Creed series 10!

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  8. Best if you are staring out in the industry

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Game Tester in Pune (India)
    Former Employee - Game Tester in Pune (India)

    I worked at Ubisoft full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Get to learn with the best in the industry

    Cons

    Compensation is bad. Do not expect a decent size salary.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  9. Good Place in all

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Marketing in San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Marketing in San Francisco, CA

    I worked at Ubisoft full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Leadership is fiercely loyal to their workers. They would often cut heavily into budgets to avoid laying off.

    Cons

    No upward mobility past Director level

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Just because you built it doesn't mean it is the best way.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  10. Ubisoft Montreal

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Programmer in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Current Employee - Programmer in Montreal, QC (Canada)

    I have been working at Ubisoft

    Pros

    _ Great games
    _ nice place
    _ challenges
    _ events.
    _ very good management and RH.

    Cons

    _ sometimes too big.
    _ gamers sometimes hate too much this entreprise (for bad reasons).

    Recommends
  11. 1 person found this helpful

    It was a great experience in Ubisoft (though it was short: only 6 months) working with a lot of passionate people

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Montreuil, Ile-de-France (France)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Montreuil, Ile-de-France (France)

    I worked at Ubisoft

    Pros

    - Great atmosphere
    - Challenging projects
    - Great games to work for

    Cons

    - Very few interns are hired for a full-time position after their internships

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

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