University of Texas at Arlington Reviews

Updated June 28, 2015
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  1. Graduate Teaching Fellow

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Graduate Teaching Fellow
    Current Employee - Graduate Teaching Fellow

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington full-time (More than 3 years)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Colleagues are friendly and work hard on the work. Paycheck is not bad compared to other schools.

    Cons

    The need for instructors are highly in demand. class size is too big. Some class have over 100 students and they can't learn well.


  2. PhD student/Instructor - Management department (school of business)

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Enhanced Graduate Teaching Assistant in Arlington, TX
    Current Employee - Enhanced Graduate Teaching Assistant in Arlington, TX

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    UTA is trying to become a 'tier one' research school, so there are currently some resources being devoted to this and likely will be for some time. It is nice to work on a college campus, if you take the time to walk around a bit every day (not during the summer, of course, if you want to live).

    As for the dept of management in particular, relatively low resources devoted to the PhD program means relatively low competition and honestly pretty low politics and petty conflicts (i.e. among faculty, but also other PhD students) to maneuver around. I have not heard of any PhD student being taken advantage of by unethical professors (e.g. stealing research ideas, crazy teaching loads), though in more competitive places, there are horror stories. In fact, unless you have teaching experience already and really want to teach, they don't make you teach until you begin your 3rd year, which basically allows you to finish your PhD classes before having to teach.

    Cons

    In the way of personal disclosure, I decided to get a PhD because I have below average social skills (think high-functioning autism, aka Asperger's syndrome, aka whatever they are calling it these days). While people like me can certainly excel in academia, it can be hard to navigate relationships in a beneficial way in a program (such as this one) that does not have a structure in place for developing professional relationships with faculty.

    Management's PhD has only very recently gone to the system where they offer students pay competitive with most mainstream state school programs. Relatively low resources devoted to the PhD program means that professors have basically no time to spend developing PhD students. You need to either come understanding how the research game works, or spend a lot of time figuring it out for yourself (or get forced out of the program, which on average seems to happen to one student per cohort).

    There is an 'open door' policy, meaning that professors are open to hearing your research ideas, but unless your ideas really have legs, you aren't likely to get much helpful advice. Since the jobs that are worth going through a PhD to obtain are tenure track research positions, it is vital that you graduate with something published and are working with known researchers in the field (realistically this means UTA professors) on 3 - 5 other things if you want to land such a job. Therefore, it is a disservice to PhD students that things are run this way - and in all fairness, it is as much the result of relatively low funding as it is any individual professor.

    Advice to Management

    Implement modern, professional human resource management practices.

    Selecting PhD students - per comments above, relationship/social skills should be assessed and weighted highly. I know it has not been in the recent past, as I was offered an 'enhanced' assistantship (i.e. a paid one) with nothing more than an application (test scores, references, etc.). There wasn't even a phone interview!

    Training (i.e. to support PhD, and consequently the PhD program's, success) - I can't speak for the newest cohort, but up until then, training consisted of a couple of hours of orientation where the program coordinator (a professor) basically went over an ill-prepared outline of things they thought of. This needs to be much more systematic, and profs have the expertise to put this together - if they think it is important. I asked the director the summer before I began if he thought I could benefit from taking a math course or two - he said 'nah.' But he was wrong.

    Development - informal mentoring relationships are indirectly encouraged since being on a student's committee (program of study or dissertation) is considered as the 'service' part of a prof's job. But there needs to be training of profs on how to mentor, a significant effort to match students with profs, monitoring the productivity of relationships, and more direct encouragement/rewarding for successful relationships. It is counterproductive to force these relationships, but this should be the cornerstone of a strategy aimed at ensuring that students get involved in research projects.

    Performance management - We are told not to worry about grades in our PhD seminars and classes, but try making too many B's - a student signs their own death warrant. Be very clear and up front about this policy.
    Provide students with feedback on their ideas and writing in seminars (I finally got feedback on a paper in Year 3, and from a non-management faculty member! And I handed in no less than 6 papers in seminars/classes). Consider actively developing students' term paper ideas early in each semester. Track progress and improvement in research ideas and writing over the course of classwork and beyond.
    Require that students get involved in some research project with a faculty member (which always happens anyway, as there are technically assignments of students to faculty for research purposes), and also require profs to give students feedback on the help they give (and track it over time). Students are required to help profs on anything they might need, and without any promise of authorship credit on any paper that results - I did as much as I could because I wanted to learn how everything was done, and never expected any authorship credit. But I somehow gained a reputation for being lazy and indignant - all without my knowledge, of course, until the reaming I received one day from the dept. head... I have a very hard time with social cues, you see. This could have been avoided with the above advice, which is standard practice in modern, professional workplaces.
    Apart from mentoring relationships, get PhD students some data to crunch to facilitate development of substantial statistical skills. It could be the same data for each cohort, but better still would be an ongoing data collection that the students can run under supervision of faculty. Of course, to do it right takes funds, but I'll bet some students could generate some creative ideas on how to do it under existing circumstances.
    All of these suggestions and more should be in service of a broader strategy that focuses on ensuring that PhD students obtain a higher level of research skills, develop productive professional relationships with faculty, and are involved in research that is published or close to published by the time they go on the job market.


  3. General Review

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at University of Texas at Arlington full-time

    Recommends
    Recommends

    Pros

    Family friendly environment and campus

    Cons

    Salaries are low and non-competitive


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  5. Great Work Environment

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Arlington, TX
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Arlington, TX

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington full-time (Less than a year)

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    Pros

    Relaxed campus setting. A lot of diversity and plenty to do around town.

    Cons

    There is a lot of bureaucracy involved in the job place, much like at any major university.


  6. Office Assistant- Apartment and Residence Life

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Office Assistant in Arlington, TX
    Current Employee - Office Assistant in Arlington, TX

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    Exiting work environment
    Fun Co-Workers
    Events constantly going on

    Cons

    Low wage
    Scheduling Unpredictability
    Unpleasant Residents
    Disrespect towards student employees

    Advice to Management

    Pay the student employees more
    Take greater care into the hiring of Resident Directors


  7. Software Engineer

    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington full-time

    Pros

    Good benefits
    Year end almost 2 weeks vacation

    Cons

    Sate funding is less of lavishness.


  8. It's was a good first job

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - ILL Library Assistant in Garland, TX
    Current Employee - ILL Library Assistant in Garland, TX

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington part-time (Less than a year)

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    Pros

    The workload was not difficult

    Cons

    I was rarely allowed time to study for my classes whenever i finished my work early


  9. Graduate Research Assistant

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Arlington in Arlington, TX
    Current Employee - Arlington in Arlington, TX

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great environment and good labs. Good motivation to do research and publish your work.

    Cons

    More emphasis on current industry related research and faculty.


  10. Graduate Research Assistant

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington

    Pros

    Great work environment
    Great people to work with
    Good salary

    Cons

    I don't have anything bad to say about this place


  11. Great place to work

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Graduate Research Assistant in Arlington, TX
    Current Employee - Graduate Research Assistant in Arlington, TX

    I have been working at University of Texas at Arlington part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great work environment
    Wonderful and down to earth people to work with

    Cons

    Nothing bad about this place



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