Yeshiva University Reviews

Updated October 2, 2014
Updated October 2, 2014
40 Reviews
2.8
40 Reviews
Rating Trends

Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Yeshiva University President Richard M. Joel
Richard M. Joel
26 Ratings

Employee Reviews

Sort: Popular Rating Date
  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Unfortunate

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - IT Tech in New York, NY
    Former Employee - IT Tech in New York, NY

    I worked at Yeshiva University full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Flexible work hours, jewish holidays, good vacation and enough sick days. Room to expand if management considers it and if you are in the right department. You will also get chance to learn/break/fix since there is no immediate pressure from mgmt like you would see in corporate/for-profit/finance company. The real resources (people) are the best at this company.

    Cons

    This is mostly for ITS since I don't know how other departments work but they may go through many issues/challenges ITS also goes through.
    Major CONS:
    - Low Salary + Salary Freeze + cuts via lowering retirement contribution)
    - Not enough people
    - Politics (LOTS OF IT)
    - No financial management (not sure what the finance department does all day)

    Overall, the management is very bad (probably the upper mgmt). If you work at YU, you will affirm that management doesn't know anything about technology and they also do not know who the valuable/important employees are because they don't believe in meetings or spending time with their team. There is a PMO office that doesn't do anything. In my 5 years, I have never seen or heard from a PM about any projects we did and we did some huge projects (Datacenter/physical/hardware/virtual moves of production systems). The MGMT spends more time with consultants than the regular employees who actually know what is really happening. Wrong people (idiots) get promoted and the real people who do the work usually get left behind.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    No advice for management because this place will never change. The culture is what needs changing; not mgmt.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    I worked at Yeshiva University and it was a great place

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Yeshiva University full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Fantastic university for those that have a Jewish culture and experience. Friendly employees great environment for people early in their career to advance

    Cons

    The university has faced a number of lawsuits and the culture has begun to change. It is not as competitive as it once was

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  3.  

    Great Place to Work

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Director in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Director in New York, NY

    I worked at Yeshiva University full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Allows for entrepreneurial spirit. Very solid benefits. Lots of vacation. Good community. Visionary leadership that was looking for new ideas.

    Cons

    Fiscal problems led to some cut backs. At times, felt like promotions amongst leadership were for wrong reasons.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be careful who is placed in leadership positions. Continue to cultivate great culture.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  4. Is this helpful? The community relies on everyone sharing – Add Anonymous Review


  5. 2 people found this helpful  

    Putrefying, stultifying environment caused by long-time pervasive poor management which has been self-perpetuating.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Systems Administrator in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Senior Systems Administrator in New York, NY

    I have been working at Yeshiva University full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Lots of (Jewish) Holidays. Leave work at 2:30PM on Friday.

    Cons

    A professional disrespect for employees and disdain of employees technical ideas.

    The irony between what Yeshiva University advertises itself as and what it is like to work this is astounding. YU pitches itself as a University Education with a human touch. But the work environment does just the opposite. People who go in with useful marketable skills. Over time, employees loose the ability to reason, to be motivated about their professions, and thus become useless to society, should they lose their jobs, which ultimately will happen.

    How could it be like this? The upper management lives in its own hermetic bubble. Think Dr Sues' "Yertle the Turtle" meets "The emperor who has no clothes"

    At the highest levels of management, ill-advised decisions are made and promulgated down without regard for those who have to carry them out.

    For example, in order to meet largely artificial deadlines, contractors had been called in. Often they do a poor job because they managed by those who don't know what they are doing and are not held accountable. When they leave, employees are expected to take things over and largely they can't because they are ill-trained and ill-equipped to do so. Since they didn't have any say in what was done, they aren't that motivated.

    Let me give an example here. I once had a manager where if I said, "let's go right" he'd say "no, we'll go left". If I say lets try this, he'd say, "no I think that is better" and so on. In many cases the differences the two were inconsequential. After a while, I would think, why bother offering a solution? Why put any emotional investment in any of this no matter how inconsequential?

    But the brain is a use it or lose it kind of thing. I routinely asked software developers if they had any automated tests any of their code, and to my great surprise, one said "I used to do that in a job before I started working here." She said this as a matter of fact not as a criticism. And if she started doing this practice on her own at YU, her manager wouldn't have understood it, let along be supportive of it. Tasks get passed down but it is very hard for ideas to percolate up. So after a while people just stop trying.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Create a technically engaging environment. Engage employees for how to solve a problem rather enforce your own or accept what your management, your peers, or customers have given you. It is just as important to listen to your employees as it is to listen to needs of people at your level and above. Yes, the customer comes first, but it can't always be at the expense of your ability to provide stable, reliable service or at expense of people who need to make this happen. When the group suffers, you as manager ultimately suffer too.

    In order to solicit ideas or have group consensus, you need to meet with the group you manage. So have regular group meetings. They can be short, but in those meetings make sure you don't do all of the talking. In fact it's best if you do the least amount of talking.

    Don't just filter things up from management, but filter down as well. Instead of emails that start off offering a task to be done, start off describing the problem. Only after laying the groundwork should you describe what you think should happen. But even better, don't offer a solution even if it may be obvious. Instead let the employee instead suggest (the possibly obvious) solution. If that doesn't happen you can always offer your solution.

    If you find yourself sending an email that start off "Can you...?" you are probably not approaching things optimally.

    Don't just be a switchboard operator where you get a message from X and then forward it to Y in a reply all. Use judgement in reply all email messages. Rather than a back-and-forth email discussion cc'd to people outside your group, work one-on-one and summarize to others what the problem and or solution or approach that was taken.

    Encourage employees to keep up-to-date technically. This is a university, so it wouldn't be uncommon for someone in the group to prepare a talk or lead a discussion about some emerging technology. This could be done say at lunch if there is no desire to spend precious work time.

    The CEO/President of the University generally does hold "Town Hall" meetings. That is good. He sometimes mingles with the employees, too often surrounded by his unguent minions.

    But I have heard from others that although he puts up a good show and is entertaining, they don't believe he is taking action on the grievances. I've heard people say they feel this is just to allow people to let off steam. And given the overall poor results, this probably has validity.

    Although the CEO has town meetings at no lower level is that typically done.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  6. 1 person found this helpful  

    YU - a university without proper leadership and oversight

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - IT Tech in New York, NY
    Current Employee - IT Tech in New York, NY

    I have been working at Yeshiva University part-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    flexible work schedule, low pressure work environment, competitive salary, prestigious name, easy commute from most of the metropolitan NYC

    Cons

    salaries frozen for several years, ineffective and unresponsive management, operates with a lot of bureaucracy and politics, very little top level oversight, no drive to improve, never any money to upgrade or improve infrastructure and operations, HR is a pain to deal with

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Try actually doing your job and working your paid hours! If you don't know much about computers you should not be a manager of an IT dept!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  7. 1 person found this helpful  

    Summer Library Aide

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Summer Library Aide in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Summer Library Aide in New York, NY

    I worked at Yeshiva University as a contractor (less than an year)

    Pros

    Got to be around books all day, they allowed you to keep the ones they were throwing out.

    Cons

    Only one of the bosses was a real scrooge but she might not work there anymore.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Is the AC adjustable?

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  8.  

    food handler

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Yeshiva University full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    great place to work, excellent benefits

    Cons

    keep your mouth shut and not open

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
  9.  

    Many opportunities if you seek them out.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Accounting Tutor in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Accounting Tutor in New York, NY

    I have been working at Yeshiva University part-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Working here makes your resume look a little better.
    People are generally nice and easy to work with.

    Cons

    A bit bureaucratic at times.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  10.  

    Top notch faculty and students, but administration gets in the way of progress

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Research Assistant in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Research Assistant in New York, NY

    I worked at Yeshiva University part-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    The students and faculty are top rate. Many students will choose Yeshiva University over Ivy League schools due to the Jewish studies department. This results in a large number of very motivated and intelligent students.

    Cons

    Faculty does not support the sciences. Research building will be shut down and locked randomly, which helps the budget but makes serious research a big challenge. Lack of support for any type of innovative programs in the sciences.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Listen closely to what your faculty and students have to say. They are what makes your school worthwhile.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  11. 2 people found this helpful  

    Horrible place to work

    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Yeshiva University

    Pros

    Lots of time off with regular and Jewish holidays. Weren't very many perks other than that.

    Cons

    Overall employee morale continued to get worse and worse the longer I worked there. Many people just stopped caring altogether and just came to work to collect a paycheck. There was a complete lack of communication, and there were no raises in the time I worked there. I worked with several people who were clearly not competent to do the job they were hired for. There was no accountability for doing a poor job, and daily work was chaotic, where I was in constant "firefighting" mode, which left little to no time to make progress on projects. There was little to no appreciation from upper management. I was miserable and constantly frustrated on a daily basis. The place seems like a sinking ship and I had to leave before I drowned.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Appreciate your employees. Find ways to improve morale and improve communication.

Yeshiva University Photos

Work at Yeshiva University? Share Your Experiences

Yeshiva University

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.