Glassdoor Blog » Career Advice /site-us Glassdoor - An Inside Look at Jobs and Companies Tue, 31 Mar 2015 21:30:06 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 5 Things To Consider Before Walking Out On Your Job /blog/5-walking-job/ /blog/5-walking-job/#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 21:30:06 +0000 http://blog-content.glassdoor.com/site-us/?p=17875 quit jobKeeping emotions in check, particularly when you are fed up at your job, can be tough to do. But if you let it get the best of you and quit in anger or in a rage it can come back to bite you. Lots of people at some point have fantasized about taking a page … Continued

5 Things To Consider Before Walking Out On Your Job is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Keeping emotions in check, particularly when you are fed up at your job, can be tough to do. But if you let it get the best of you and quit in anger or in a rage it can come back to bite you.

Lots of people at some point have fantasized about taking a page from Steven Slater, the Jet blue flight attendant who quit over the plane’s public address systems, grabbed two beers and made his exit by deploying the evacuation slide. But following in his footsteps can actually end up torpedoing your career. After all Slater was arrested for his actions and had to pay Jet Blue restitution.

“As much as you feel justified (by rage quitting) you create an illusion that you are the fly off the handle kind of person who can’t keep emotions in control,” says Brie Reynolds, director of online content at FlexJobs. “For future employers you’ll look like somebody you can’t be trusted to keep themselves composed.”

Not only will rage quitting tatter your reputation but it will also be something that stays with you for years to come. Anytime you are on an interview you are going to have to explain your sudden departure and if you work in a specific industry potential employers may have gotten wind of it already.

While it make be hard to control your emotions, especially if you have taken a lot from your current employer, there are ways to temper your reaction and protect your brand. From taking a step back to creating an internal check list, here’s a look at five ways to prevent your emotions from causing you to quit.

1. Know your triggers

Chances are if you are contemplating quitting out of anger and frustration, it’s not the first time you’ve felt that way about your current job situation. One way to prevent yourself from losing it, says Reynolds, is to identity your triggers ahead of time. Let’s say it’s your micro managing boss asking for a status update every ten minutes that gets you in a rage. If you know he or she can be a catalyst for your departure you’ll figure out ways to deal instead of quitting. “Take into account every time you feel tense and frustrated,” says Reynolds. “If you know that sort of thing is coming you are more likely to be able to control yourself.”

2. Take all your sick and vacation days

Feeling fed up can ebb and flow depending on your state of mind, which is why Kathy Harris, managing director of recruiting firm Harris Allied advocates taking all of your available time off to reflect before letting your emotions rue the day. Use that time off to tweak your resume, think about what you want to do with your career and look for a new job. Cooling your heels for a couple of days or a week may be all you need to get your emotions back under control.

3. Think about it from a financial perspective

Quitting may feel good in the moment but if it means you can’t make your rent, put food on the table or otherwise pay your bills it will hurt over the long run. Because of that, Ben Peterson, CEO and Co-Founder of BambooHR, says one way to calm yourself is to think about how quitting will impact your finances. “You don’t sell a car and then try to figure out what car to buy next,” nor should you resign from your employer without having a plan B. If necessary Peterson says to self-impose a rule that you can’t make employment decisions without a 72 hours cooling off period.

4. Talk it over with an alley or mentor

If your boss or co-worker gets you in a rage a way to prevent it from getting ugly is to talk yourself down with a mentor or alley, says Harris. “Sometimes all it takes is to have someone to talk to,” she says. Be careful that the person you are venting to is trustworthy. After all things can get even worse if your alley repeats everything you said.

5. Take a time out

A tried and tested way to calm an irate toddler or child is to put him or her in a time out. For adults who are thinking of quitting in a fit of anger a time out can work for them too. While it may not be feasible to sit on a naughty chair staring at the wall for ten minutes, Reynolds says taking deep breadths or having a place to go whether it’s for a walk around the block or in the bathroom can go a long way in calming you down. “If you feel like you might be on the verge of rage quitting go to the lobby or walk around the block,” says Reynolds. “Remove yourself from the situation.”

5 Things To Consider Before Walking Out On Your Job is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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4 Shocking Job Skills That Will Help You Stand Out /blog/4-shocking-job-skills-stand/ /blog/4-shocking-job-skills-stand/#comments Tue, 24 Mar 2015 15:00:32 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17843 ThinkstockPhotos-103578643You’ve probably heard a lot of advice about selling your skills during an interview. Sure soft skills like adaptability and a positive attitude are just as important as hard skills used on the job. But, there’s a new part of the skills gap employers are seeing. Today’s Millennial candidates are missing key fundamental skills, and … Continued

4 Shocking Job Skills That Will Help You Stand Out is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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You’ve probably heard a lot of advice about selling your skills during an interview. Sure soft skills like adaptability and a positive attitude are just as important as hard skills used on the job. But, there’s a new part of the skills gap employers are seeing.

Today’s Millennial candidates are missing key fundamental skills, and they might not be what you’d expect. Princeton researchers recently administered a test measuring the job skills of adults aged 16 to 65, in 23 countries, and found U.S. Millennials rank lowest in a couple of skills typically learned in elementary school.

Here are four unexpected job skills to play up to help you stand out among the crowd:

1. The ability to follow directions.

Literacy, including the ability to follow simple directions, stood out as one of the top areas where Millennials aren’t quite up to snuff, according to Princeton’s research.

The next time you communicate with a potential employer, demonstrate your unique attention to detail. Ask questions that show you’ve thoroughly researched the company and position responsibilities. Follow instructions on assessment tests and projects with care.

2. Practical math.

Thanks to the calculator feature on smartphones, executing mental math is no longer a requirement for most of us. But this convenience might be more detrimental in the long-run, especially when we have a workforce of employees who cannot perform simple addition and subtraction problems on the spot. That’s the direction U.S. Millennials seem to be heading, according to Princeton.

Now, I’m not suggesting you recite multiplication tables at your next interview. Instead, beef up your basic math skills alongside your job search so you’re ready to solve for X, should you be tested. Though the position might have little to do with numbers, it never hurts to keep your critical thinking skills fresh.

3. Problem solving in technology-rich environments.

Nearly every position out there requires problem solving skills, but in today’s tech-rich landscape, these skills applied to working with technology are even more crucial. Unfortunately, Princeton’s test reveals U.S. Millennials fall behind the rest of the world and other age groups in this skill, too.

It’s not about knowing how every piece of office equipment or computer program works; it’s about being able to troubleshoot problems when you encounter them.

If you have valuable experience working with a troublesome scanner or debugging computers at your last job, share that with the hiring manager. Your proven track record of solving tech problems will demonstrate you can do the same in any role, placing you above the rest.

4. Basic word processing skills.

As much of our business and commerce migrates online, digital skills will be invaluable to remain competitive in the future job market. In fact, they’re already moving into high-demand, according to a recent study by Burning Glass Technologies. The study found 78 percent of middle-skill jobs, or jobs that require an associate’s degree, require digital skills such as spreadsheet and word processing proficiencies.

During your job search, familiarize yourself with the programs your ideal job requires. If there are any you have yet to learn, teach yourself in your spare time. This will show hiring managers you’re proactive and self-motivated.

It’s easy to overlook these basic skills, since many of us take them as a given. As these skills become endangered in the wake of the many conveniences, brush up on them and use them to your advantage.

What other skills do you have that set you apart from your competition?

4 Shocking Job Skills That Will Help You Stand Out is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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3 Reasons Why Longer Resumes Work /blog/3-reasons-longer-resumes-work/ /blog/3-reasons-longer-resumes-work/#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2015 15:00:08 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17839 ThinkstockPhotos-178115173With all the hubbub about short and sweet writing in this attention-deficit disordered culture, shorter isn’t always better when it comes to resumes. Here are 3 reasons why: 1. Context matters. While lean and mean rules when it comes to copywriting, muscle still matters. After all, “lean” and “muscle” goes hand-in-hand, and a more muscular story … Continued

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With all the hubbub about short and sweet writing in this attention-deficit disordered culture, shorter isn’t always better when it comes to resumes.

Here are 3 reasons why:

1. Context matters. While lean and mean rules when it comes to copywriting, muscle still matters. After all, “lean” and “muscle” goes hand-in-hand, and a more muscular story may distinguish you from the next candidate. If you want to prove to your next hiring manager that you know your stuff, then visualize a story with rippling muscles that grip the reader.

For example, instead of just saying:

Before: Completed 30,000-seat stadium painting, repairs and cleanup.

You might say:

After: Withstanding triple-digit temperatures and complicated scheduling, and often operating alone, performed labor-intensive maintenance to support peak operating conditions of sports facilities, including:

  • 30,000-seat stadium painting, repairs and cleanup.

By providing the context of challenges withstood (triple-digit temps and complex scheduling, while working alone), this candidate proves she can handle the heat and work independently to achieve timely goals.

2. Culture matters: A meatier resume affords opportunity to weave in your unique personality traits that set you apart and also help to court a right-fit employer. While a resume that blends narrative with concrete results may seem counterintuitive to just-the-facts resume speak, it works, because it connects emotion (and culture of the candidate) to his performance.

An example Narrative Lead-in:

Ablaze with focused energy, Joseph Carter fuels his sales management brand by: Funneling sales into the pipeline, breeding partnerships, driving sales efficiencies and innovating joint strategies across large, diverse geographic territories.

3. Robust Stories Matter: Often, in an effort to be short and sweet, careerists omit critical chapters of their story. While it’s true, the intention of a resume is to land the interview, and you want to entice them to call you with ‘just enough’ information, don’t shortchange your story by assuming you’ve captured their attention with only a few words.

Sometimes, the value of providing a bit more detail—a multi-chapter approach—is building a stronger case that keeps your resume in the ‘call’ pile versus tossed in the trash.

For example:

Chapter 1

  • Spawned a sales team epiphany as to the value of ‘winning (bigger) in collaboration with diverse others.’ As result of multilayered, driving initiatives, revenue grew aggressively to >$950K in programs 1st year, before fanning out to multiple other markets.

Chapter 2

  • Within 12 months, the B2B partnership accomplished its sales plan, focused on gross profit, and within 24 months, became largest companywide, with >3.2M in sales.

3 Reasons Why Longer Resumes Work is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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5 Reasons Why A Creative Resume Will Do You More Harm Than Good /blog/5-reasons-creative-resume-harm-good/ /blog/5-reasons-creative-resume-harm-good/#comments Thu, 19 Mar 2015 15:00:54 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17829 136398587In the highly competitive job market, job seekers are always seeking creative ways to stand out. A tactic for many is to step away from the black and white text of a page and craft a creative resume to draw attention. However, these creative additions to your resume might be hurting more than helping. Here … Continued

5 Reasons Why A Creative Resume Will Do You More Harm Than Good is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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In the highly competitive job market, job seekers are always seeking creative ways to stand out. A tactic for many is to step away from the black and white text of a page and craft a creative resume to draw attention.

However, these creative additions to your resume might be hurting more than helping.

Here are five ways your creative resume is hurting your job search:

1. It’s not customized. Almost 40 percent of executives say the most common mistake job candidates make on a resume is including information that’s not targeted or job-specific, according to a survey by The Creative Group.

Each time you apply for a new position, change your summary to reflect the impact you will make at the company or in the industry. Include specific skills that align with position needs, and leave out the ones that don’t.

2. It has too much flair. Stick with the tried and true black, easy-to-read fonts like Times New Roman or Century Gothic. Leave off the “about me” rainbow pie charts and other infographic stylings.

If you’re applying for a creative position, bring your colorful portfolio pieces and personal marketing documents to the interview. Your resume’s priorities should be clarity and accessibility.

3. It’s oversaturated with keywords. You might still believe the lie that your resume will only be seen by hiring managers if it’s stuffed with the right keywords. Employers use screening software to perform comprehensive searches; if you’re qualified, your resume will be seen. Designing your resume for a computer program will not make it appealing for human eyes.

4. You didn’t cut the fluff. Include relevant information only. In the Creative Group survey, 27 percent of executive respondents said another mistake candidates make on their resumes is including either inaccurate or too much information.

Don’t widen the margins, decrease the font size and call it a day. Be brutal. Take that backspace key and trim off all those filler words and redundant statements.

5. You left dates off. You might think this is a smart way to hide your short stints at previous jobs or how long you were out of work. Or, you might not want employers to know how old you are to avoid age discrimination. But, it will backfire.

Leaving your career timeline open for interpretation is a major red flag to employers. They know it’s a cover-up and cannot see your career progression.

Have you used a creative resume in the past? Did it result in a job offer?

5 Reasons Why A Creative Resume Will Do You More Harm Than Good is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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6 Steps To Find Your Voice In The Workplace /blog/6-steps-find-voice-workplace/ /blog/6-steps-find-voice-workplace/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 15:00:29 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17795 GettyImages_170083558There’s good news and bad news in the workplace of 2015. The good news is that there has never been a better time to be a work professional than right now. The bad news is that there is still entirely too much suffering in silence going on. Too much leading by intimidation and too much … Continued

6 Steps To Find Your Voice In The Workplace is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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There’s good news and bad news in the workplace of 2015. The good news is that there has never been a better time to be a work professional than right now. The bad news is that there is still entirely too much suffering in silence going on. Too much leading by intimidation and too much fear caused by bullying.

The fix? Speaking Up. Silence is the enemy.

In my work as a trainer all over the world, I see that the number one challenge staff face is to find their voices to speak up to their managers and colleagues. A close second (in challenges, that is) is that too many undervalue their worth. They say, “I can’t speak up. I’m afraid of losing my job.” I say, “If you keep staying silent, I’m afraid you are going to lose you.”

Here’s the thing. If you speak your mind respectfully, directly, and with specific details, you not only will not lose your job, you will mostly likely be setting the stage for a promotion, not to mention improved self-confidence, self-esteem, self-respect and the respect of others.

What are we staying quiet about? Lots of things…

  • Voicing a concern about a difficult manager or co-worker
  • Saying what we need to do our work better
  • Expressing a differing opinion
  • Negotiating salary during the interview process (Only 5% of women will negotiate)
  • Asking for a raise and/or promotion
  • Confronting a bully
  • Reporting the toxic behaviors of bullies
  • Discussing a brewing problem
  • Talking about the need for training
  • Justifying a promotion
  • Asking for time off

True Story
I’m so sorry. I had no idea.” Angela’s executive of three years was moody and often abusive. He yelled, used profanity, and publicly humiliated Angela and other staff. He ruled with fear and intimation and most everyone was frightened to say a word. The stress level was off the charts because it was getting worse.

One day the executive pushed Angela too far and she snapped. She followed him into his office and closed the door. She told him that he was chasing good people away in droves and that the disrespect was intolerable. She told him specifically what he said and did that was offensive and that it needed to stop “right now.” Angela turned around, left the room, and went back to her desk. She was shaking but had zero regrets.

In a few minutes her boss came out of his office with tears in his eyes and said, “I am so sorry. You are absolutely right. I had no idea my behavior was so bad. It won’t happen again.” It didn’t. The executive apologized to the rest of the team. The kicker? Angela has now been with her executive for 26 years.

We have heard stories similar to Angela’s many times. Some assistants find it difficult to believe that a bully can be unaware but it is true. Standing up and speaking out directly and in detail is a strategy that is effective and reduces tremendous angst in the office.

How Do You Speak Up? Here’s the 6-Step Plan.

  1. Practice saying the words out loud. The more you say them out loud, the easier it will be to say them. Many people will say that they don’t speak up because they will cry. Practicing saying the words will minimize the chance of crying. The main problem with tears is that they diminish your message.
  2. Pick your “battle” and choose your moment. Ask for time alone with the person. No public humiliation. What you need to say is between the two of you. There is great power in speaking to the elephants in the room by asking the questions, “Can we talk?” or “I can see something is bothering you. What can I do to help?”
  3. Stay calm, clear, and direct. Be specific and factual in your examples. Say, “It made me feel X when Y happened yesterday and Z happened last week.”
  4. Allow the other person to save face. Say, “I know that you might not know how this impacted me so I felt it was important for me to tell you.” Speak only for yourself and not for others.
  5. Prepare something in writing to clarify what you are saying. Putting these ideas on paper communicates the seriousness of the issues.
  6. Stop Talking. Once you speak your mind, be quiet and wait. Tolerate the awkward silence until the response comes. Even if the person does not come around all the way, your relationship is forever changed. You are now known as a person who will not stay quiet when there is a problem and that is a very good thing.

Awesome things happen when you find your voice to speak up about the things that matter. Most of all, you matter. I am rooting you on.

6 Steps To Find Your Voice In The Workplace is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Unemployed? Here Are 5 Things You Should Do /blog/unemployed-5/ /blog/unemployed-5/#comments Thu, 26 Feb 2015 19:00:25 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17766 GettyImages_136262193Losing your job often comes on suddenly. Even if you had seen signs of your job’s demise and were planning an escape hatch, the actual dissolution of your job still can feel like a smack in the face. In many cases, losing a job is like a death. As such, many people find themselves grappling … Continued

Unemployed? Here Are 5 Things You Should Do is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Losing your job often comes on suddenly. Even if you had seen signs of your job’s demise and were planning an escape hatch, the actual dissolution of your job still can feel like a smack in the face. In many cases, losing a job is like a death.

As such, many people find themselves grappling with unfamiliar emotions while they also must gear up for and conduct a job search, quickly. Feelings of unworthiness, fear, insecurity and even anger may circulate, leading to tears, aggressive behavior, reclusiveness, over-sharing, desperation, paralysis by analysis and more.

All the while, the drumbeat of finding a new job marches on, with or without your positive energy. And each day that passes without a job offer feels like weeks, weeks feel like months. Figuring out how to wrangle down bills until the next paycheck spurs further anxiety.

However, examining and unwinding from the negativity that has you all knotted up—if done well–can allow you to move ahead while also creating residual gains only possible from such a loss.

Some of the potential gains of job loss follow.

You can:

1. Reconnect with and sharpen your goals. Encapsulated in the borders of a day-to-day job, you kept your mind on the company goal but had no time to focus on personal aspirations. Your own goals, therefore, began to fade. With more time to examine and percolate on your next steps, you are now free to create a new picture ‘target’ that helps you aim your arrow.

2. Build a new story punctuated with the exclamation points of your achievements, including the nuances of your unique value. Take time to articulate your resume in a way that not only makes your future employer’s heart race, but also makes your own heart sing.

3. Feel vulnerable. While many of us feel at our strongest when our jobs and our lives are humming along, we often begin to take it all for granted, feeling over-confident. Outside storms, circumstances, personalities, the economy, marketplace shifts and many other factors can disrupt your life and career in an instant. A loss of a job is just one result of such a disruption.

Allowing the feelings to flow can be therapeutic and sensitizing. You can use this period of heightened awareness and sensitivity to make modest, or even major changes that may have a profound and lasting effect on your (and your family’s) future.

4. Ask for help. Reaching out for help, whether it’s professionally to a career strategist or to a friend or family member. is an opportunity to allow others to serve you during your struggle. People instinctively like to help others who are hurting, and if you reach out for help, you often can find solutions that you never would have come up with on your own.

5. Get healthy. Often losing a job is in tandem with leaving a toxic work environment. If that is the case for you, then unsuctioning yourself from the noxious office walls will actually shore up your attitude and possibly even, your physical health. Workers caught up in the web of toxicity often report ulcers, migraines and even much worse, as a result of internalizing stress and pressure. By leaving this negativity behind, you can chart a new, more vigorous course, physically and mentally.

Unemployed? Here Are 5 Things You Should Do is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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5 Ways Your Hiring Manager May Be Lying To You /blog/5-ways-hiring-manager-lying/ /blog/5-ways-hiring-manager-lying/#comments Thu, 26 Feb 2015 16:00:05 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17785 GettyImages_489271637Rebecca is a marketing professional who graduated from college in 2014. When she accepted her first job offer, she was promised a promotion after six months of employment, at which point she would also receive a five percent raise. After a year of working at ABC Marketing Group, Rebecca is still in the same position … Continued

5 Ways Your Hiring Manager May Be Lying To You is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Rebecca is a marketing professional who graduated from college in 2014. When she accepted her first job offer, she was promised a promotion after six months of employment, at which point she would also receive a five percent raise.

After a year of working at ABC Marketing Group, Rebecca is still in the same position as when she started working and hasn’t received a raise. Rebecca inquired with her boss numerous times about what she was promised during her interview, but her boss hasn’t followed through.

Feeling confused and hurt by her employer, Rebecca begins to think about finding her next job.

One reason an employer might lie during a job interview is to attract the best talent. According to an October 2014 study by the Career Advisory Board, only seven percent of 524 hiring managers surveyed believe most job seekers have the right combination of skills need to fill open positions.

Unfortunately, many employers make candidates read the job offer through rose-colored glasses. Here are five ways employers lie to candidates during job interviews:

1. “We’ll be in touch for future job opportunities.”

If you get turned down for a job, it’s very common for hiring managers to say they’ll be in touch when a new position opens. The reality is, it’s up to the candidate to stay in touch with the hiring manager.

To avoid missing out on future opportunities with the company, make sure you develop a relationship with the hiring manager. Check in with the hiring manager every few months to send them samples of your latest work and ask about opportunities. This will keep your name and application fresh in their mind.

2. “We offer room for growth.”

Practically every job seeker wants to land a job where they can grow with the company. Unfortunately, many employers make this promise without knowing whether they will be able to offer the candidate a promotion in the future.

Ask the hiring manager what the timeline typically looks like for an employee to receive a promotion. You should also ask what your future would look like at the company. This will help you determine whether the company truly offers room for growth.

3. “You’ll love our company culture.”

While many employers hire for cultural fit, it’s important to find out as much information about the culture before accepting the position.

Ask the employer if you can job shadow for a day before accepting the position. You could also ask to talk to employees who’ve worked with the company for a while. This will help you get a better taste of what the culture is like.

4. “You’re allowed to work from home.”

Many employers realize their employees want to work from home. In fact, a 2013 report published by FlexJobs discovered 83 percent of 1,300 the respondents said they’d be more loyal to their employer if they had flexible work arrangements.

Although an employer might mention flexible work options during the job interview, it doesn’t mean they’ll always follow through on it. Make sure the employer clearly outlines its telecommuting policy in your job offer if this perk is important to you.

5. “We offer professional development opportunities.”

Professional development is an important perk for many professionals. However, every employer has their own idea of professional development.

After the hiring manager outlines professional development opportunities, ask for specific details. For example, will the company pay for memberships to professional organizations or provide you with skills development classes? This will help you determine whether the employer can offer the development you desire.

As a job seeker, it’s absolutely necessary to be an empowered candidate during the interview process. Employers will do whatever they can to hire the best talent for their company. Once the job offer is made, make sure everything they promised is in writing.

What is the biggest lie an employer has ever told you?

5 Ways Your Hiring Manager May Be Lying To You is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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6 Ways To Damage Your Relationship With Your Recruiter /blog/6-ways-damage-relationship-recruiter/ /blog/6-ways-damage-relationship-recruiter/#comments Thu, 26 Feb 2015 15:00:05 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17769 GettyImages_166195708Love it or hate it, recruiters are a key component of a comprehensive job search. Not only are good recruiters clued into the market, but they know whose hiring and often get word of new opportunities before the rest of the world does. Yet far too often many job seekers don’t recognize that. They begrudgingly … Continued

6 Ways To Damage Your Relationship With Your Recruiter is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Love it or hate it, recruiters are a key component of a comprehensive job search. Not only are good recruiters clued into the market, but they know whose hiring and often get word of new opportunities before the rest of the world does. Yet far too often many job seekers don’t recognize that. They begrudgingly turn to a recruiter for help and end up torpedoing what could have been a mutually beneficial relationship.

From lying about your experience to going off script when it comes to salary, here’s a look at six surefire ways to lose the support of one of the key players in your job search.

Mistake No. 1: Lying to your recruiter

Most relationships are built on trust, and that’s true of the recruiter/job seeker relationship. A quick way to turn that into mistrust is to lie about your background and experience. “Recruiters are here to help,” says Tom Gimbel, president and CEO of LaSalle Network, the staffing and recruiting company. “They need to know if there are any skeletons in your closet, your honest salary expectations and what you are looking for in your next role.” Recruiters put their reputation on the line when they recommend you for a position and if they get burned because you lied about your experience, education or background it could hurt the recruiter’s reputation too, say Gimbel.

Mistake No 2: Keeping your other job searches under wraps

You may think you are maximizing your chances of getting a new job if you use multiple recruiters. but if you aren’t telling them about each other you are going to end up with a bunch of angry ones. Nobody is going to want to invest time into you only for you to turn around and go with another job elsewhere. That doesn’t mean you have to be exclusive, but you should be forthcoming. “Your recruiter genuinely wants to act in your best interests but needs to know the lay of the land,” says Paul Slezak, co-founder of RecruitLoop.com, the recruitment website. “If you’re interviewing elsewhere, or even if you’ve applied for other roles, please just be up front about it.”

Mistake No. 3: Overselling your interest in the position

If you waste your recruiter and the company’s time going through the motions when you aren’t really interested in the job, it’s going to sour the relationship and possibly tarnish your reputation in the industry. It’s ok to test the waters, but just be up front about your interest in the role. “Recruiting is a small world,” says Jason Buss, recruiting innovation officer at SmartRecruiters. “A lot of people know a lot of people so how you treat your recruiter is going to impact your future.”

Mistake No. 4: Going off script when it comes to salary

Part of the process of working with a good recruiter is figuring out your salary range. Once you are both on the same page, your recruiter can then seek out opportunities for you. But if you flip the script during a job interview and ask for more money, both you and your recruiter will look bad.“If you said you are looking for something in the $50,000 range and you get a $55,000 offer and counter with $60,000 that will impact your relationship with your recruiter,” says Buss.

Mistake No. 5: Blowing off your recruiter

Whether your recruiter has a potential job for you or he or she wants feedback from an interview, it behooves you to keep the recruiter in the loop. And that doesn’t mean getting back to them five days later. Any recruiters’ worth their salt aren’t going to set up an interview without first speaking to you which is why it’s important to be responsive. Same goes for feedback after the fact. If the recruiter doesn’t know how things went how is he or she able to go to bat for you with the employer? “They might be your agent … but feedback is a two-way street,” notes Slezak.

Mistake No. 6: Not treating your recruiter well

When it comes to meeting with a recruiter, it’s important to keep in mind they are the gatekeeper to your future job and therefore should be treated with the same respect a hiring manager gets. That means being on time, dressing appropriately, and above all maintaining a professional demeanor. “The more professional you appear to them, the more they will promote you,” says Mark Renn, Chief Executive Officer at The CS Team, a career management company. “Get them to like you, it won’t hurt.”

6 Ways To Damage Your Relationship With Your Recruiter is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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How to Energize a Dull, Demotivating Culture /blog/energize-dull-demotivating-culture/ /blog/energize-dull-demotivating-culture/#comments Wed, 25 Feb 2015 12:30:31 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17760 GettyImages_180410172Being happy at work may seem counterintuitive for some people, but it is possible. While business tasks can be tedious and difficult, when a culture of positivity exudes, even the most challenging projects are more bearable, even rewarding. If you feel your current office culture doesn’t meet expectations, don’t lose hope. Whether you’ve been on … Continued

How to Energize a Dull, Demotivating Culture is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Being happy at work may seem counterintuitive for some people, but it is possible. While business tasks can be tedious and difficult, when a culture of positivity exudes, even the most challenging projects are more bearable, even rewarding.

If you feel your current office culture doesn’t meet expectations, don’t lose hope. Whether you’ve been on the job hunt for a few months—or even a few years—shift is possible.

For example, you may find yourself in an environment lacking lightheartedness and levity. If you are a bubbly, outgoing personality with extrovert tendencies, you may seek a more demonstrative manager or teammates with whom you can feed off one another’s energy.

A culture where the overall tone, from the CEO to the front line staff is consistently serious may come across to you as humorless and deflating. You may not be happy in this environment over the long haul because being more open and sociable is fuel that motivates you to perform.

How To Initiate the Beginning of a Culture Shift

  • Request a meeting with your boss with a multifaceted goal to discuss future objectives, while also airing your concern. Propose a solution, related to the energy drain the culture has on your spirits, your teammates’ attitudes and overall office productivity.
  • A possible initial solution to gain culture shift traction may include asking your boss (or your boss’s boss; or even the company owner, if it’s a small organization) to employ regularly scheduled ‘walkabouts’ where he/she simply connects with the staff, on a more personal level.
  • The walkabout agenda is simple: walk around the office every Friday and strike up conversations about everyone’s plans for the weekend, or simply ask, “How are you doing?” Ask about their family, their extracurricular activities, their new child, grandchild or dog, whatever might light them up.
  • Perhaps even a bit of joke telling humor can be incorporated into the mix. If the boss’s personality doesn’t lend itself to such comedic behavior, he or she can defer to the extrovert in the group to spin tales of humor and add levity. Just be sure to bring a smile and a chuckle to the party. The point is to connect on a lighter level and warm things up, as work that is “all work” can often feel stifling and demotivating.

While it is ideal to research a company’s culture prior to accepting a new job (you can do this through Glassdoor’s company reviews as well as through various social media channels), the fact remains some cultures decline over time or do not live up to expectations. If this is the case, take the reins and see what you can do to steer your company’s culture back on a positive course!

How to Energize a Dull, Demotivating Culture is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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9 Things To Say “Yes” To In 2015 /blog/9-2015/ /blog/9-2015/#comments Fri, 30 Jan 2015 17:00:35 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17690 say yesDo you feel overwhelmed with a wildly overflowing plate of responsibilities and not enough hours in the day? If so, you are not alone. However, 2015 is a new year and a great time to say “yes” even though your first instinct might be to say “no way!” to anything new. After all, aren’t you … Continued

9 Things To Say “Yes” To In 2015 is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Do you feel overwhelmed with a wildly overflowing plate of responsibilities and not enough hours in the day? If so, you are not alone.

However, 2015 is a new year and a great time to say “yes” even though your first instinct might be to say “no way!” to anything new. After all, aren’t you drowning in work already? The irony is that saying “yes” opens door to unexpected and welcome opportunities that can actually tame these wild times

1. SAY YES to learning something new every day. Go onto your favorite news app and read up on something about which you know nothing. Doing this is guaranteed to broaden your perspective, expand your mind, and make you a more interesting person. You just never know how this information will come in handy. Learning is empowering and addictive and feels great in part because of the dopamine it creates. One of my colleagues wrote after reading a compelling article, “My brain feels so happy right now.”

2. SAY YES to your manager when she asks for a volunteer on a complicated and not so fun project. Do it with a smile and a positive attitude. Watch the opportunities flock your way as you become known as a team player who runs towards a problem rather than away from it. Behaviors like this also spell job security.

3. SAY YES to being a mentor to a colleague or two. Of course you are pressed for time but helping someone else is not only personally gratifying, it is a great skill to add to your resume. It also makes it easier to find a mentor of your own.

4. SAY YES to being active in a professional organization. People do things for people, not companies. When the going gets tough, (if you suddenly need a job, for example) the people who will come through to help will be those who know you and with whom you have a relationship. Yes, this involvement will take time but the benefits can be extraordinary.

5. SAY YES to speaking your mind in a compassionate way. Most people appreciate and respect a straight-shooter. Don’t beat around the bush or shove the issue under the rug. Say what you think without any sugarcoating and others will be inspired to do the same.

6. SAY YES to your career dreams. Don’t allow your workload or fear or money to stop you from doing what you need to do to achieve your goals. It’s so easy to find reasons not to take that workshop or attend the conference or go to the networking meeting. Not enough time or money or energy, right? And, your manager might say “no.” But…he might say “YES.” In a world that is moving very fast, making yourself a priority is critical to managing the wild workplace.

7. SAY YES to a healthier lifestyle. Sit less, exercise more, drink water, eat less gluten, sugar and dairy, and get more sleep. Eating right gives you more energy to make the most out of your day and stay sane. Oh no! It turns out your mother was right about all these things.

8. SAY YES to achieving at least one of the goals on your long-term To-Do List. Whether it is to learn the guitar, take salsa dancing lessons, or to sky dive, pull the trigger and do it. Your confidence and self-esteem will thank you and the benefits will spill over into your work life. Confidence is your secret sauce and it is impossible to miss, isn’t it?

9. SAY YES to having fun. Time is flying and 2016 will be here before you blink. Hang a large laminated year calendar on the wall to plug in the big events of your life so everyone can see it. This includes vacations. Yes, plural! Did you know that American workers voluntarily gave up 169 million paid vacation days last year? Having worked for over 30 years, I can promise you that the work will still be there when you get back. GO and be a role model for others to do the same!

9 Things To Say “Yes” To In 2015 is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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