Highest and Lowest Rated Tech Companies

Highest and Lowest Rated Tech Companies

2009-12-22 13:09:39

We buy their gadgets, use their software or work with their hardware every day, but when it comes to the people who work at the companies who make these products or services, is it really as impressive as it seems from the outside packaging? As we wrap up the end of the year, Glassdoor offers an inside look into the technology companies whose employees work to make our lives easier, more efficient and more productive to find out: Is the packaging on the outside reflective of what’s happening on the inside?

The list of highest and lowest rated technology companies comes as part of the Glassdoor Employees’ Choice Awards, which was previewed last week on GigaOm. The award honor the top 50 Best Places to Work in which the company achieves at least a 3.0 or greater company rating and whose CEO garners a 50%+ approval rating. First we look at a list of the highest rated tech companies* that exceeded these minimum requirements – Juniper Networks, National Instruments and Google come in as the three highest rated technology companies in respective order.

A Juniper Networks Senior Software Engineer gets straight to the point about the benefits of working at Juniper:

“- excellent compensation
- best in class technology, plenty of great projects
- good balance with personal life
- excellent hardware and software engineers
- good information by several on site tech talks each week by industry experts and project teams”

A National Instruments employee comments, “Company has a play hard – work hard attitude toward its employees – it’s awesome here.”

And a Google Developer writes in, “What has made Google really great are the brilliant minds that work there…Somehow, Google has managed to preserve an open culture where people really aren’t arrogant.”

In terms of CEO approval, it’s Steve Jobs at Apple who holds top spot among CEOs on the highest rated technology companies. Google’s Eric Schmidt (87% approval) and National Instrument’s James Truchard (85% approval) follow Jobs’ closely behind.

Highest Rated Tech Companies

But it appears that not all technology employees feel their companies have been on the nice list this year. In fact as you’ll see there have been 13 leading technology companies to make the highest rated list but 15 who have made the lowest rated technology companies list. The lowest rated tech companies* list is based on those companies who received a 2.5 company rating or lower and a CEO approval rating less than 50%. Xilinx, Affiliated Computer Services and Hewlett-Packard are the lowest rated among technology companies. Here are some highlights from among the respective company reviews:

“Has lost its way in innovation and leadership. No longer empowers employees in the decision making process.” – Xilinx Employee

“I got to a supervisor possition very quickly, but career ends here. Made very clear by upper management. A degree is needed for almost anything, but it does not matter what the degree is in.” – Affiliated Computer Services Supervisor

“I can’t wait till the economy is on the upswing and jobs are plentiful. I predict a mass exodus. I hope Hurd has a contingency plan.” – Hewlett-Packard Business Partner

Lowest Rated Tech Companies

Do you work for these companies? Do you agree with your fellow colleagues when it comes to how satisfied you are with the company? If you haven’t already, share your company review and give insights into how you feel about the career opportunities, compensation & benefits, employee morale, recognition & feedback, senior leadership, work/life balance at your company.

* Highest and lowest rated companies have received at least 25 reviews during December 1, 2008 and December 1, 2009 from US-based employees.

Categories: Reviews

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