Glassdoor Blog » Jobs /site-us Glassdoor - An Inside Look at Jobs and Companies Fri, 27 Mar 2015 15:00:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Want to Get Hired as an Intern? Try These Cities /blog/hired-intern-cities/ /blog/hired-intern-cities/#comments Wed, 25 Feb 2015 12:58:45 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17774 GettyImages_153734070While Glassdoor has identified the 25 Highest Rated Companies for Internships in 2015, college students may be wondering which cities offer the best opportunities to actually get hired as an intern. Based on the top 20 U.S. cities by population, Glassdoor is also revealing which cities have the most open internships and where your best … Continued

Want to Get Hired as an Intern? Try These Cities is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
While Glassdoor has identified the 25 Highest Rated Companies for Internships in 2015, college students may be wondering which cities offer the best opportunities to actually get hired as an intern. Based on the top 20 U.S. cities by population, Glassdoor is also revealing which cities have the most open internships and where your best chances are of getting your foot in the door.

According to Glassdoor jobs data, New York City has the most open internships with 2,500 available. The San Francisco Bay Area follows closely with 1,500 open internships (and is the city with the most companies on our Highest Rated Companies for Internships in 2015 report) and Los Angeles, with 1,400 open internships, rounds out the top three cities.

See where else across the U.S. you can get hired:

Glassdoor Open Internships U.S. (2)

Also, to help you find an internship or entry-level job, Glassdoor is excited to launch Glassdoor for Students, a free job search resource customized to meet the specific needs of today’s college students, allowing you to find and research the latest internships, entry-level jobs and salaries, career tips and more. Read more about Glassdoor for Students.

Where do you want an internship? Check out all open internships.

Want to Get Hired as an Intern? Try These Cities is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/hired-intern-cities/feed/ 0
25 Best Jobs In The UK for 2015 /blog/25-jobs-uk-2015/ /blog/25-jobs-uk-2015/#comments Tue, 24 Feb 2015 10:09:24 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17751 538530775Glassdoor has released its inaugural report on the 25 Best Jobs In the UK for 2015*. Whether you are looking for a new job or career, or if you just want to see if your job makes the top 25, this report is a useful guide to what’s hot in the job market today. The … Continued

25 Best Jobs In The UK for 2015 is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
Glassdoor has released its inaugural report on the 25 Best Jobs In the UK for 2015*. Whether you are looking for a new job or career, or if you just want to see if your job makes the top 25, this report is a useful guide to what’s hot in the job market today.

The Best Jobs in the UK are determined using the Glassdoor Job Score, which takes into account three key factors – average annual base salary, career opportunities rating and number of job openings. The jobs that made this list stand out across all three categories. Check out the complete results:

  1. Marketing Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.5
  • Number of Job Openings: 2,965
  • Average Base Salary: £46,561
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.6
  1. Finance Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.4
  • Number of Job Openings: 4,357
  • Average Base Salary: £52,081
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.2

  1. Mechanical Engineer – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.4
  • Number of Job Openings: 5,964
  • Average Base Salary: £34,799
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.5
  1. Sales Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 3,869
  • Average Base Salary: £45,613
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Business Analyst – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 3,437
  • Average Base Salary: £46,047
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. IT Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 3,708
  • Average Base Salary: £57,818
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.0
  1. Civil Engineer – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 4,137
  • Average Base Salary: £36,142
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Product Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,415
  • Average Base Salary: £52,478
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Lawyer – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 925
  • Average Base Salary: £55,020
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.5
  1. Software Engineer – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 14,846
  • Average Base Salary: £40,400
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.0
  1. Human Resources Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 810
  • Average Base Salary: £53,978
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.7
  1. Business Development Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 4,328
  • Average Base Salary: £41,003
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.1
  1. Internal Audit Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.1
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,460
  • Average Base Salary: £39,141
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.6
  1. Solutions Architect – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.1
  • Number of Job Openings: 957
  • Average Base Salary: £66,349
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Network Engineer – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.1
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,807
  • Average Base Salary: £40,023
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Investment Analyst – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.9
  • Number of Job Openings: 487
  • Average Base Salary: £53,954
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Operations Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.9
  • Number of Job Openings: 2,644
  • Average Base Salary: £47,496
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 2.9
  1. Recruiter – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.9
  • Number of Job Openings: 4,784
  • Average Base Salary: £23,419
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Brand Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.8
  • Number of Job Openings: 656
  • Average Base Salary: £39,557
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Office Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.8
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,648
  • Average Base Salary: £27,643
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Executive Assistant – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,613
  • Average Base Salary: £29,612
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Accountant – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 8,170
  • Average Base Salary: £29,488
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 2.9
  1. Sales Engineer – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.5
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,864
  • Average Base Salary: £34,845
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.0
  1. UX Designer – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.5
  • Number of Job Openings: 260
  • Average Base Salary: £47,437
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.2
  1. Trader – Glassdoor Job Score: 3.5
  • Number of Job Openings: 349
  • Average Base Salary: £63,250
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.0

Job Search Tip: Don’t forget that when thinking about a new job, you also want to consider other aspects that can make it enjoyable – this includes reading company reviews to see what a company culture is like, reading up on the benefits offered and getting more details into compensation i.e. bonuses, equity, commission, etc.

* Methodology: Glassdoor’s 25 Best Jobs in the UK report identifies specific jobs with the highest overall Glassdoor Job Score. The Glassdoor Job Score is determined by weighting three factors equally: earning potential (average annual base salary), career opportunities rating, and number of job openings. Results represent job titles that rate highly among all three categories. The Glassdoor Job Score is based on a 5-point scale (5.0=best job, 1.0=bad job). For a job title to be considered, it must receive at least 25 salary reports and at least 25 career opportunities ratings shared by UK-based employees over the past year (26/01/14–26/01/15). The number of job openings per job title represents the total number of active jobs and/or jobs posted to Glassdoor over the past three months as of 25/01/15. This report takes into account job title normalisation that groups similar job titles. Ratings and scores run to nine or more decimal places.

25 Best Jobs In The UK for 2015 is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/25-jobs-uk-2015/feed/ 0
25 Highest Paying Jobs In Demand /blog/highest-paying-jobs-demand/ /blog/highest-paying-jobs-demand/#comments Tue, 17 Feb 2015 12:00:09 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17719 PhysicianCurious which jobs pay the most and are in high demand right now? Glassdoor has released its inaugural 25 Highest Paying Jobs In Demand report, identifying top jobs that pay the most and are in high demand by employers nationwide. Job seekers: While these jobs pay handsomely, it’s important to note that most also require … Continued

25 Highest Paying Jobs In Demand is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
Curious which jobs pay the most and are in high demand right now?

Glassdoor has released its inaugural 25 Highest Paying Jobs In Demand report, identifying top jobs that pay the most and are in high demand by employers nationwide.

Job seekers: While these jobs pay handsomely, it’s important to note that most also require a high level of experience, skills and education to get hired.

Check out the complete results:

1. Physician

  • Average Base Salary: $212,270
  • Number of Job Openings: 7984

2. Pharmacy Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $131,099
  • Number of Job Openings: 1787

3. Software Architect

  • Average Base Salary: $130,891
  • Number of Job Openings: 3229

4. Software Development Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $ 123,747
  • Number of Job Openings: 2249

5. Finance Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $123,534
  • Number of Job Openings: 9224

6. Solutions Architect

  • Average Base Salary: $121,522
  • Number of Job Openings: 3530

7. Lawyer

  • Average Base Salary: $120,424
  • Number of Job Openings: 5520

8. Analytics Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $115,725
  • Number of Job Openings: 1408

9. IT Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $115,642
  • Number of Job Openings: 17,161

10. Tax Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $114,966
  • Number of Job Openings: 3622

11. Pharmacist

  • Average Base Salary: $114,715
  • Number of Job Openings: 9160

12. Product Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $113,959
  • Number of Job Openings: 9918

13. Physician Assistant

  • Average Base Salary: $110,871
  • Number of Job Openings: 43678

14. Supply Chain Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $106,632
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,667

15. Data Scientist

  • Average Base Salary: $105,395
  • Number of Job Openings: 3433

16. Security Engineer

  • Average Base Salary: $102,749
  • Number of Job Openings: 2,060

17. QA Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $101,330
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,689

18. Computer Hardware Engineer

  • Average Base Salary: $101,154
  • Number of Job Openings: 1,264

19. Marketing Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $100,229
  • Number of Job Openings: 14,179

20. Database Administrator

  • Average Base Salary: $97,258
  • Number of Job Openings: 9,041

21. UX Designer

  • Average Base Salary: $96,855
  • Number of Job Openings: 2,010

22. Human Resources Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $96,406
  • Number of Job Openings: 7,220

23. Software Engineer

  • Average Base Salary: $96,392
  • Number of Job Openings: 99,055

24. Business Development Manager

  • Average Base Salary: $95,139
  • Number of Job Openings: 11,037

25. Sales Engineer

  • Average Base Salary: $90,899
  • Number of Job Openings: 5,508

Job Search Tip: Did you know that when you search for a job on Glassdoor, you can also research your expected salary? In the job search feed, when you see a position you’re interested in, click on the link that says “salaries”. This will show you a drop-down image and link to all of the salary data we have for that particular company.

Methodology: For a job title to be considered for Glassdoor’s Highest Paying Jobs In Demand report, job titles must receive at least 75 salary reports shared by U.S.-based employees over the past year (1/26/14 – 1/25/15). Of the job titles that meet the salary criteria, they must also be in the top 50th percentile for number of job openings per job title to qualify for this report. Job openings represents active job listings and/or jobs posted within the last three months, as of 2/2/15. This report takes into account job title normalization that groups similar job titles.

25 Highest Paying Jobs In Demand is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/highest-paying-jobs-demand/feed/ 0
Are You Expecting A Pay Rise This Year? One-Third Of UK Employees Are; Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey (Q4 2014) /blog/expecting-pay-rise-year-onethird-uk-employees-glassdoor-uk-employment-confidence-survey-q4-2014/ /blog/expecting-pay-rise-year-onethird-uk-employees-glassdoor-uk-employment-confidence-survey-q4-2014/#comments Thu, 05 Feb 2015 00:00:15 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17706 453233071One in three UK employees (35 percent) are expecting a pay rise in the next 12 months, and of those that are, around half are expecting an increase of just two percent or less. In a sign that the recruitment market could heat up in 2015, 39 percent of employees said that they would look … Continued

Are You Expecting A Pay Rise This Year? One-Third Of UK Employees Are; Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey (Q4 2014) is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
One in three UK employees (35 percent) are expecting a pay rise in the next 12 months, and of those that are, around half are expecting an increase of just two percent or less. In a sign that the recruitment market could heat up in 2015, 39 percent of employees said that they would look for a new job if they do not get a pay rise in the next 12 months. Whilst it is unlikely that all of these employees will carry this through- if they did it would have a huge impact on retention and recruitment costs for UK businesses as this is a total of 12 million UK employees. In fact, recent figures from Oxford Economics suggest that it costs businesses £30,000 to replace an employee in terms of loss of productivity and recruitment.

These are the findings of the Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey (Q4 2014), suggesting that UK employees are feeling more concerned about redundancy than three months ago, combined with a general feeling that they might get more money elsewhere.

This survey tracks employee sentiment every quarter and monitors four key indicators of employee confidence: salary expectations, job market optimism/re-hire probability, job security and business outlook optimism. It is conducted online by Harris Interactive, on behalf of Glassdoor among more than 2,000 people within Great Britain.

Job Security

Forty one percent of men are worried about being made redundant compared to 29 percent of women. This is a significant difference and might be explained by the fact that there are more women than men in part-time jobs generally, and only 28 percent of part-time employees fear redundancy compared to 38 percent of full-time workers.

In terms of regional UK differences, forty seven percent of employees in the North East are concerned about being laid off, whereas in Wales, just 21 percent of employees are concerned. This significant difference could be reflective of company redundancy announcements about layoffs in the North East area.

redundancies

Job Market Optimism

Thirty four percent of those unemployed but looking for work report optimism that they could find a job matched to their experience and most recent compensation level in the next six months, however this is a drop of seven percentage points since Q314.

When it comes to existing employees (both full and part-time), 30 percent think that they could find a job in the next six months. Optimism amongst this group has also dropped, but only by one percentage point, and in fact has held steady all year.

rehire

Business Outlook

One in three employees (34 percent) think that their company’s business outlook will improve in the next six months, up slightly from 32 percent last quarter. Employees in London are the most optimistic, as almost half (46 percent) believe that their company’s business outlook will improve in the next six months. This compares to just 20 percent of employees in the South-West, making this the most pessimistic region.

business outlook

Check out more from our Q4 2014 Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey, including our survey supplement, which provides a detailed breakdown of results.

Glassdoor publishes the UK Employment Confidence Survey each quarter, helping job seekers, employees and employers monitor and track employee confidence in the UK and how it relates to business, jobs, companies, careers, hiring and more.

Are You Expecting A Pay Rise This Year? One-Third Of UK Employees Are; Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey (Q4 2014) is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/expecting-pay-rise-year-onethird-uk-employees-glassdoor-uk-employment-confidence-survey-q4-2014/feed/ 0
25 Best Jobs in America for 2015 /blog/jobs-america/ /blog/jobs-america/#comments Tue, 27 Jan 2015 10:00:46 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17662 493799899Whether you want a new job, or just want to make sure you already have a great job, Glassdoor has released its inaugural report highlighting the 25 Best Jobs in America for 2015. This new report identifies the 25 best jobs based on each job’s overall Glassdoor Job Score*. The Glassdoor Job Score is determined … Continued

25 Best Jobs in America for 2015 is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
Whether you want a new job, or just want to make sure you already have a great job, Glassdoor has released its inaugural report highlighting the 25 Best Jobs in America for 2015.

This new report identifies the 25 best jobs based on each job’s overall Glassdoor Job Score*. The Glassdoor Job Score is determined using three key factors – earning potential based on average annual base salary, career opportunities rating and number of job openings. The jobs that made this list stand out across all three categories. Check out the complete results:

  1. Physician Assistant – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.8
  • Number of Job Openings: 45,484
  • Average Base Salary: $111,376
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.5
  1. Software Engineer – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.6

  • Number of Job Openings: 104,828
  • Average Base Salary: $98,074
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Business Development Manager – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 11,616
  • Average Base Salary: $94,907
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.5
  1. Human Resources Manager - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 8,073
  • Average Base Salary: $96,443
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.6
  1. Finance Manager- Glassdoor Job Score: 4.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 9,728
  • Average Base Salary: $122,865
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Marketing Manager- Glassdoor Job Score: 4.6
  • Number of Job Openings: 14,647
  • Average Base Salary: $100,130
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Database Administrator- Glassdoor Job Score: 4.5
  • Number of Job Openings: 9,790
  • Average Base Salary: $97,835
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Product Manager - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.5
  • Number of Job Openings: 10,294
  • Average Base Salary: $113,363
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Data Scientist - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.4
  • Number of Job Openings: 3,449
  • Average Base Salary: $104,476
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.8
  1. Sales Manager - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.4
  • Number of Job Openings: 26,193
  • Average Base Salary: $76,556
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Solutions Architect – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.4
  • Number of Job Openings: 3,982
  • Average Base Salary: $121,657
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Mechanical Engineer- Glassdoor Job Score: 4.4
  • Number of Job Openings: 16,065
  • Average Base Salary: $73,015
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. QA Engineer - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 26,383
  • Average Base Salary: $77,499
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.2
  1. Business Analyst - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 21,337
  • Average Base Salary: $74,638
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.2 
  1. Electrical Engineer - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 10,435
  • Average Base Salary: $76,803
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Network Engineer - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 14,092
  • Average Base Salary: $87,518
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.2
  1. Civil Engineer - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 6,120
  • Average Base Salary: $73,383
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.5
  1. Audit Manager - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 4,585
  • Average Base Salary: $69,271
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.9
  1. Physical Therapist - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 27,579
  • Average Base Salary: $64,806
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.2
  1. IT Project Manager - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.3
  • Number of Job Openings: 5,700
  • Average Base Salary: $103,710
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.2
  1. Client Services Manager - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 2,377
  • Average Base Salary: $103,736
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.7
  1. Supply Chain Manager - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 3,754
  • Average Base Salary: $83,795
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.4
  1. Mobile Developer - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 4,651
  • Average Base Salary: $79,810
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.3
  1. Nurse Practitioner – Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 15,341
  • Average Base Salary: $95,171
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.1
  1. Sales Engineer - Glassdoor Job Score: 4.2
  • Number of Job Openings: 6,007
  • Average Base Salary: $91,318
  • Career Opportunities Rating: 3.2

Job Search Tip: Don’t forget that when thinking about a new job, you also want to consider other aspects that can make it enjoyable – this includes reading company reviews to see what a company culture is like, reading up on the benefits offered and getting more details into compensation i.e. bonuses, equity, commission, etc.

* Methodology: Glassdoor’s 25 Best Jobs in America report identifies specific jobs with the highest overall Glassdoor Job Score. The Glassdoor Job Score is determined by weighting three factors equally: earning potential (average annual base salary), career opportunities rating, and number of job openings. Results represent job titles that rate highly among all three categories. The Glassdoor Job Score is based on a 5-point scale (5.0=best job, 1.0=bad job). For a job title to be considered, it must receive at least 75 salary reports and at least 75 career opportunities ratings shared by U.S.-based employees over the past year (1/10/14–1/9/15). The number of job openings per job title represents the total number of active jobs and jobs posted to Glassdoor over the past three months, as of 1/20/15. This report takes into account job title normalization that groups similar job titles.

25 Best Jobs in America for 2015 is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/jobs-america/feed/ 0
2 Tips To Fix Job Burnout Before It’s Too Late /blog/2-tips-fix-job-burnout-late/ /blog/2-tips-fix-job-burnout-late/#comments Thu, 16 Oct 2014 14:00:00 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17315 179039030Job burnout can not only hurt your career, it can create serious medical issues if left unchecked. Yet countless employees don’t realize or ignore the signs of job burnout until it is too late. “People get this sort of ironman or woman mentality where they work really hard and refuse to say no and let … Continued

2 Tips To Fix Job Burnout Before It’s Too Late is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
Job burnout can not only hurt your career, it can create serious medical issues if left unchecked. Yet countless employees don’t realize or ignore the signs of job burnout until it is too late.

“People get this sort of ironman or woman mentality where they work really hard and refuse to say no and let stress build up,” says Todd Cipperman, founding principal of Cipperman Compliance Services, which provides outsourced compliance services to the financial services industry. “Rather than dealing with it they take dramatic actions like quitting their job.”

1. Know the signs

According to career experts, in order to prevent job burnout from manifesting you have to be able to recognize the symptoms. While people deal with stress differently there are some commonalties that should signal it’s time to make a change.

For instance, Kathy Harris, managing director of recruiting firm Harris Allied, says some of the common symptoms of job burnout include the inability to concentrate or pay attention at work, losing interest in your job or not feeling engaged, and deteriorating job performance. According to Amanda Augustine, the job search expert for job website TheLadders, other signs include feeling tired emotionally, mentally or physically all the time, and compulsively checking your phone or email or thinking about work. Additional indicators also include feeling bitter or angry about your job, having zero work-life balance, and seeing your health and personal life start to suffer. “We see a lot of job burnout with middle management,” says Harris. “Middle managers are pulled in 13 different directions. It’s sort of akin to working in quicksand.”

2. Get the burnout in check

Identifying the symptoms of job burnout is half the battle. Correcting the situation wins the war. According to Cipperman, employees often suffer in silence because they assume their bosses know how hard they are working and the long hours they are clocking, but in many cases the bosses don’t know what’s going on. Because of that, Cipperman says employees have to speak up and let their managers know how they are feeling. He pointed to one senior executive who instead of suffering in silence came to him and let him know that he was feeling overwhelmed, couldn’t sleep, was irritable and as a result it was hurting his quality of life.  “You have to put it in context,” says Cipperman. “At the end of the day you are not saving lives, your job is not in jeopardy and you don’t work alone.”

In addition to speaking up, Augustine says employees have to look for ways to reclaim their work-life balance. After all, you don’t want your job burnout to ruin your marriage or relationships outside of the office.  Ways to do that, says Augustine, include making time for physical activity, knowing when to take a break, and when to block out me time. “Identify which activities out of work are most important to you and determine when you’ll need to be ‘off the grid’, whether it’s hitting up the gym during lunch or getting home in time to eat dinner with your family,” she says. “Determine the time frame you need to be ‘off the grid’ to accommodate this priority and communicate these expectations to your team.”

Sometimes all it takes to get out of the burnout mode is to take a vacation. This can be particularly true of those employees who never take off out of fear things will implode when they are gone. Cipperman says taking frequent small vacations instead of one long one can go a long way in keeping your stress in check and preventing the burnout from happening. Its ok, he says, for people to also take a mental health day here or there as long as it doesn’t impact productivity. Even getting out of the office for lunch or taking a walk around the block can go a long way in reducing some of that work related stress.

While quitting your job can be an extreme way to manage job burnout, in some cases it becomes a necessity, especially if your health is failing as a result of the stress. “A lot of people quit when it gets so bad it’s impacting their personal life,” says Harris. “You have to know what works for you and what doesn’t and what you need to do in order to fix the problems.”

 

2 Tips To Fix Job Burnout Before It’s Too Late is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/2-tips-fix-job-burnout-late/feed/ 2
Big Drop In Redundancy Fears Among UK Employees; Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey (Q3 2014) /blog/big-drop-redundancy-fears-uk-employees-glassdoor-uk-employment-confidence-survey-q3-2014/ /blog/big-drop-redundancy-fears-uk-employees-glassdoor-uk-employment-confidence-survey-q3-2014/#comments Tue, 14 Oct 2014 23:00:49 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17309 optimistic employeeNineteen percent of UK employees are worried about being made redundant, a drop of ten percentage points in the past quarter. Confidence in finding another job is also slowly on the up – 31 percent of employees and those self-employed say they would be able to find a job matched to their experience and current … Continued

Big Drop In Redundancy Fears Among UK Employees; Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey (Q3 2014) is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
Nineteen percent of UK employees are worried about being made redundant, a drop of ten percentage points in the past quarter. Confidence in finding another job is also slowly on the up – 31 percent of employees and those self-employed say they would be able to find a job matched to their experience and current compensation levels in the next six months, up two percentage points since the second quarter of 2014. In addition, those unemployed but looking for work are significantly more confident when it comes to finding a job – 41 percent of those unemployed but looking for work report optimism that they could find a job matched to their experience and most recent compensation level in the next six months, an increase of 11 percentage points since Q214.

These are the findings of the Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey (Q3 2014), suggesting that UK employees are feeling much more comfortable about their work situation.

This survey tracks employee sentiment every quarter and monitors four key indicators of employee confidence: salary expectations, job market optimism/re-hire probability, job security and business outlook optimism. It is conducted online by Harris Interactive, on behalf of Glassdoor among more than 2,000 people within Great Britain.

Job Security

Twenty-three percent of men are worried about being made redundant compared to 15 percent of women. This is a surprisingly large gender gap, suggesting that men are feeling the pressure more, which could affect their performance in the workplace. Women are also more confident of finding a new job – see below.

In terms of regional UK differences, twenty nine percent of employees in London are concerned about being laid off, whereas in the South East and North East of England, just seven percent of employees are concerned. This significant difference could be reflective of the higher level of restructuring which may be taking place in the Capital.

GD_UK_Q3_Redundancies

Job Market Optimism

Interestingly, those unemployed but looking for work are significantly more confident this quarter when it comes to finding a job – 41 percent of those unemployed but looking for work report optimism that they could find a job matched to their experience and most recent compensation level in the next six months, an increase of 11 percentage points since Q214.

Of those employed/self-employed and unemployed but looking, women (33 percent) are slightly more confident when it comes to finding a job than men (30 percent).

GD_UK_Q3_Re-hire

Salary Expectations

When it comes to increases in income, thirty five percent of employees expect to receive a pay rise in the next 12 months, down two percentage points since Q214. Interestingly, 43 percent of men expect a pay rise, compared to just 26 percent of women.

The lowest paid employees – those in the social grade DE – are the most confident about receiving a pay rise (41 percent). The recent media focus on increasing minimum wage will no doubt have helped boost confidence amongst these employees.

GD_UK_Q3_Salary

Check out more from our Q3 2014 Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey, including our survey supplement, which provides a detailed breakdown of results.

Glassdoor is excited to continue to publish the UK Employment Confidence Survey each quarter, helping job seekers, employees and employers monitor and track employee confidence in the UK and how it relates to business, jobs, companies, careers, hiring and more.

Big Drop In Redundancy Fears Among UK Employees; Glassdoor UK Employment Confidence Survey (Q3 2014) is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/big-drop-redundancy-fears-uk-employees-glassdoor-uk-employment-confidence-survey-q3-2014/feed/ 0
How I Got My Job: How to Ace Long Distance Interviewing /blog/job-ace-long-distance-interviewing/ /blog/job-ace-long-distance-interviewing/#comments Tue, 07 Oct 2014 14:00:47 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17267 178855245Interviewing for a new job and nailing that first impression is challenging enough, but when you’re trying to relocate, you’re required to ace the interview on the phone or through a video conference. You have to prove to the company that you’re the best candidate without ever stepping foot in the front door. Sound tough? … Continued

How I Got My Job: How to Ace Long Distance Interviewing is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
Interviewing for a new job and nailing that first impression is challenging enough, but when you’re trying to relocate, you’re required to ace the interview on the phone or through a video conference. You have to prove to the company that you’re the best candidate without ever stepping foot in the front door. Sound tough?

14366f1Meet Theresa Foy. She recently relocated to San Francisco from Milwaukee, WI and landed a job in client support at Zenefits. She used Glassdoor to better understand the interview process for jobs thousands of miles away – and nailed it. Here’s how Theresa found a job she loves in a brand new city.

Glassdoor (GD): What type of job were you looking for and how did you use Glassdoor?

Theresa Foy (TF): I was coming from the real estate industry doing social media and content creation and looking to get into the tech industry. I knew San Francisco was the right area; I just needed to learn more about what jobs were available, what the interview processes were like and whether I’d be a good cultural fit for the company. I used Glassdoor in a few ways. First, I targeted startups that were in a growth stage and then came to Glassdoor to look at the company reviews and better understand the company culture. Then, because I knew cost-of-living is much higher in San Francisco, I looked at salaries for the company, job title and location. Finally, I looked at interview reviews and questions to better understand what the interview process would be like and if the company would be open to interviewing someone long distance.

GD: Did the interview process meet your expectations given the interview reviews you had read?

TF: I found the interview reviews to be very accurate and true to life. The advice other candidates shared on Glassdoor was really helpful, and I found the interview reviews to be the most valuable. A job seeker is already nervous about interviewing, so that inside information is so important and a confidence boost.

GD: What was the biggest challenge you faced as you started your job search?

TF: Because I was trying to make an impression through a computer screen or over the phone, the distance was definitely my biggest challenge. Showing I’m a dynamic person with a lot of offer was especially difficult. I had a lot to prove.

GD: What did you want to know when you were trying to find a job?

TF: I wanted to learn what the leadership and company structure was like because I knew that working at a startup would be different. I wanted to know management structure, company culture, how much autonomy employees had and how employees can affect change at the company. I really wanted to work at a company where I would be a good cultural fit and that was in a growth phase.

GD: What were the most important factors you were looking for in a job?

TF: A chance to grow. I ended up with two different offers, and I used Glassdoor’s company reviews to better understand which company I would have better career growth opportunity. I wanted to affect real change and impact people’s lives, whether that was through helping people use the product or working with other departments like engineering or marketing to develop better content. Your coworkers end up becoming like your family, and I wanted somewhere I could have that closeness and also make a difference.

Thanks for sharing your story, Theresa! Congrats!

Has Glassdoor helped you? We love hearing from our community on how they found a job, negotiated a salary or learned more about the interview process at a company! Plus, when you tell your story, you help countless others. Tell us your story by emailing us at blog@glassdoor.com.

How I Got My Job: How to Ace Long Distance Interviewing is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/job-ace-long-distance-interviewing/feed/ 0
These 20 Jobs Have The Best Work-Life Balance /blog/20-jobs-worklife-balance/ /blog/20-jobs-worklife-balance/#comments Wed, 24 Sep 2014 10:00:51 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17142 476728861Ever dream of a job that really allows you to balance your work life with your personal life? The truth is – some jobs do this better than others. To help, Glassdoor, the leading jobs and career community, has identified 20 of the highest rated jobs for work-life balance. This list was compiled based entirely … Continued

These 20 Jobs Have The Best Work-Life Balance is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
Ever dream of a job that really allows you to balance your work life with your personal life? The truth is – some jobs do this better than others.

To help, Glassdoor, the leading jobs and career community, has identified 20 of the highest rated jobs for work-life balance. This list was compiled based entirely on employee feedback shared on Glassdoor over the past year*.

Data Scientist (4.4 work-life balance rating), Tour Guide (4.3) and Investment Analyst (4.0) are among the top jobs for providing a great work-life balance. What other jobs are highly rated to help you live a healthy life in and out of work? Check out the complete results (Ratings based on a 5-point scale: 1.0=very dissatisfied, 3.0=OK, 5.0=very satisfied):

20 Jobs Work Life Balance Header Image

GD_WL_JobTitles1

“Not only is everyone incredibly sharp and very good at their jobs, but also, almost without exception, everyone is a pleasure to work and associate with. I’m given an incredible work/life balance.” – Facebook Data Scientist (Menlo Park, CA)

GD_WL_JobTitles2

“Great company culture, opportunity for growth, fun co-workers, work hard play hard mentality. We often have company outings, video game breaks, catered lunches.” – Geek Powered Studios SEO Specialist (Austin, TX)

GD_WL_JobTitles3

“You learn a lot about Customer Service, you get to take different workshops and classes, and managers work with you and have your best interest at heart. You meet a lot of new people and it is a great environment to work in.” – The Fox Theatre – Atlanta Tour Guide (Atlanta, GA)

GD_WL_JobTitles4

“Easy to get time off, shifts traded around, the management was nice most of the time.  The members were friendly and there were lots of free workout perks.” – YMCA Lifeguard (location, n/a)

GD_WL_JobTitles5

“I feel that the work I do is important, both to Abstrakt and our clients but also to my professional development as well. Although I am kept busy, I also have a lot of fun at work and feel like I have a good work-life balance.” – Abstrakt Social Media Manager (Saint Louis, MO)

GD_WL_JobTitles6

“Flexible schedule, free membership to workout, nice group of fitness instructors who are generally very knowledgeable about their particular classes- i.e. Zumba, yoga, spinning, clean and reasonably well maintained gym, very nice aerobics studio- large, mirrors and good sound system.” – LA Fitness Group Fitness Instructor (Montgomeryville, PA)

GD_WL_JobTitles7

“The team is incredible, there are plenty of people to learn from, there are many perks, and I always get the support I need to continually advance in my career. I also like maintaining a good work-life balance, and I can definitely do this at LinkedIn.” – LinkedIn User Experience Designer (Mountain View, CA)

GD_WL_JobTitles8

“The culture feels like a college campus where you get to work with lots of smart people who also happen to be nice. Work/life balance is good.” – Intuit Corporate Communications (Mountain View, CA)

GD_WL_JobTitles9

“Flexibility of your work schedule. Good salary. Your co-workers become a second family.” – FDNY Firefighter (New York, NY)

GD_WL_JobTitles10

“The compensation is outstanding and there really is great work-life balance. Everyone you work with is highly intelligent. Leadership encourages innovation.” – Tradebot Equity Trader (Kansas City, MO)

GD_WL_JobTitles11

“Judges are friendly and approachable, salaries are competitive, IT support is outstanding, you can be an attorney here and still maintain a good work/life balance.” – US Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims Law Clerk (Washington, D.C.)

GD_WL_JobTitles12

“Collaboration, culture, benefits, diversity, openness to new ideas, great work-life balance. Great place to gain experience.” – Wells Fargo Investment Analyst (location, n/a)

GD_WL_JobTitles13

“Incredible, lively, fun work culture. Very conscious about work-life balance (which is rare in DC).” – One Medical Group Administrative Assistant (Washington, D.C.)

GD_WL_JobTitles14

“Employees are passionate about their work and enthusiastic about coming to work each day, striking an appropriate work-life balance.” – NPR Office Assistant (Washington, D.C.)

GD_WL_JobTitles15

“Work/life balance is likely the best thing about this company. Training is excellent. Opportunities to do and try new things are always available.” – Rackspace Sales Representative (San Antonio, TX)

GD_WL_JobTitles16

“Excellent work/life balance with flexible scheduling. Fun, easy going environment.” – Lawrence Technological University Help Desk Technician (Southfield, MI)

GD_WL_JobTitles17

“The flexibility, hours, and off on weekends with family are good for me. I do not have pay for day care because of the hours. I don’t have to work if I do not want to. I can pick and choose if I want to work that day or go to that school.” – Killeen Independent School District Substitute Teacher (Killeen, TX)

GD_WL_JobTitles18

“Lots of chances to move up or lateral moves if you don’t like what you are doing. Environment values family and having a life outside of work.” – Fluor Carpenter (Boulder, CO)

GD_WL_JobTitles19

“Flexible schedule, unlimited income, great work environment.” – Century 21 Real Estate Broker (location, n/a)

GD_WL_JobTitles20

“Nice people with a high team spirit, a great work life balance, countless events, activities and benefits and low hierarchies.” – Wooga Game Designer (Berlin, Germany)

What’s the work-life balance like at your job? Let others know by sharing a review.

Interested in one of these jobs? Search open jobs now.

*Report based on at least 20 work-life balance ratings per job title shared on Glassdoor between 7/3/13-7/2/14. Work-life balance satisfaction ratings based on a 5-point scale: 1.0= very dissatisfied; 3.0=OK, 5.0=very satisfied.

These 20 Jobs Have The Best Work-Life Balance is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/20-jobs-worklife-balance/feed/ 9
One in Three UK Employees Are Disappointed With Their Job /blog/uk-employees-disappointed-job/ /blog/uk-employees-disappointed-job/#comments Wed, 24 Sep 2014 05:00:44 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=17202 StressAs we enter the run-up to the final recruitment period of the year, Glassdoor Job Expectations research reveals that many job hunters invest very little time researching new employers before accepting a job offer. In fact, across the UK, employees admitted they spent an average of just four hours looking at potential employers and just … Continued

One in Three UK Employees Are Disappointed With Their Job is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
As we enter the run-up to the final recruitment period of the year, Glassdoor Job Expectations research reveals that many job hunters invest very little time researching new employers before accepting a job offer. In fact, across the UK, employees admitted they spent an average of just four hours looking at potential employers and just over a third (35%) invested no time at all. However, when it comes to holidays, consumer lethargy is quite the reverse as they spend an average of 24 hours researching the perfect break, this is six times more than the time spent looking at employers. To put this into context, the average full time employee spends around 1,680hours a year at work with just 140 hours of annual leave.

UK employees are not taking full advantage of career research resources that could help them make better decisions about where to go to work. More than half (55 percent) of employees didn’t look at the employers website, 78 percent failed to check if the business was making a profit and 80 percent didn’t explore company reviews shared by employees. It’s hardly surprising that less than six months into the honeymoon period of a new role, 31 percent of UK employees admit they are disappointed.

Hindsight is a wonderful thing as nearly a quarter (23 percent) of employees wish they had asked more questions during the interview process, a figure that rises to 32 percent of those that have been in their job for less than six months. One in five (20 percent) wish they had insights from existing employees at their current organisation. It’s promising to see that 20 percent of 16-24 year olds regret not reading online company reviews and ratings of their current employer but this figure more than halves to just 9 percent amongst all employees.

The excuses as to why research was not carried out are rife as more than one in five (22 percent) employees claim they did not have enough information to make an informed decision about whether or not they should accept the job, rising to 39 percent of those that have been in their job less than six months.

You can help job hunters that are looking to work within your current organisation, or with your previous employers, by sharing a review on Glassdoor, which gives the inside track on what it is like to work for specific companies. Did you research your current employer enough? Do you regret not doing this? Did you do the right thing when you accepted your current job? What would you do differently next time around?

This survey was conducted online by Harris Interactive (GB) on behalf of Glassdoor among more than 1,000 employees within Great Britain.

 

 

One in Three UK Employees Are Disappointed With Their Job is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

]]>
/blog/uk-employees-disappointed-job/feed/ 0