Glassdoor Blog » Yahoo Hot Jobs /site-us Glassdoor - An Inside Look at Jobs and Companies Wed, 01 Apr 2015 02:03:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Embarrassing Moments At Work: How To Recover /blog/embarrassing-moments-work-recover/ /blog/embarrassing-moments-work-recover/#comments Thu, 29 Jul 2010 19:18:37 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=5032 Years later, I still remember that sinking feeling, just after I'd hit the Send button after writing an email complaining about an editor. My worst virtual fear was quickly confirmed: Yes, I had sent my bit of snark to the editor instead of my friend--and no, the editor wasn't amused. Although he initially refused to work with me again, he eventually accepted my apology, and we developed a strong working relationship.

Embarrassing Moments At Work: How To Recover is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Years later, I still remember that sinking feeling, just after I’d hit the Send button after writing an email complaining about an editor.

My worst virtual fear was quickly confirmed: Yes, I had sent my bit of snark to the editor instead of my friend–and no, the editor wasn’t amused.

Although he initially refused to work with me again, he eventually accepted my apology, and we developed a strong working relationship.

Know when to apologize
Taking responsibility is the way to go when you’ve committed such a faux pas, according to Alexandra Levit, the author of “New Job, New You: A Guide to Reinventing Yourself in a Bright New Career.”

“You must make it right by acknowledging the email,” Levit says. “Apologize in person and say that you acted in anger. If it’s part of an ongoing issue, ask what you can do to improve the relationship between the two of you.”

But knowing when to respond to a workplace embarrassment–and when to move on–is key to handling these awkward moments.

Know when to ignore the incident
Whether the problem is a snarky email, a wardrobe malfunction, or an office romance gone wrong, some things really are better off left unsaid.

“If there’s nothing you can do to make it better, by and large it’s better to ignore it,” says Barbara Pachter, a coauthor of “New Rules @ Work: 79 Etiquette Tips, Tools, and Techniques to Get Ahead and Stay Ahead.” “When you bring it up, you’re drawing attention to it.”

When John, 45, then a junior employee at a publishing company in New York, accidentally hit “reply all,” with his sarcastic comments about a director being a cheapskate, he first tried to recall it. That didn’t work, so he (wisely) did nothing.

“I never did get called to the director’s office, and I never did hear about the e-mail,” he says. “I spent the next six months avoiding the guy, but I didn’t get fired.”

This do-nothing strategy holds true for situations triggered by social media, such as when an unflattering photo of you surfaces on another’s feed.

“I wouldn’t address these personal details unless directly asked by a colleague, and most people won’t ask if it’s a sensitive matter,” Levit says.

What about office romance?
Discretion also works if you date a coworker, but sometimes it’s impossible to keep such interactions private.

For example, Gigi’s coworkers at a Seattle ad agency knew all about her relationship with a fellow employee because it was a very social office. After their breakup, they continued to hang out with the group.

“As long as you’re not working for that person, and it’s not interfering with work, it’s nobody’s business,” Pachter says.

Prepare for wardrobe malfunctions
Perhaps nothing can be as mortifying as getting a stain on your shirt just before a big meeting, or realizing your zipper was down when you bumped into the big boss in the hallway.

Krystn, a fundraiser for a nonprofit organization in Philadelphia, still remembers the start of her first job for the wrong reason. The fabric on her “professional” blouse didn’t breathe and she was nervous — a bad combination when being introduced to colleagues.

“I had huge sweat stains, and was trying to shake people’s hands without moving my arms–and they could see,” she recalls.

To avoid these types of scenarios, keep a spare jacket, stain remover, and sewing kit on hand if you can.

Otherwise, you have the choice of acting like the problem’s not there–or acknowledging the elephant on your shirt by making a joke.

“If you can have a good line, it will usually break the ice and then people can ignore it,” Pachter says.

One the flip side, if you notice a colleague has one too many buttons undone or an unzipped fly, say something.

“You have to be upfront and discreetly say the fly is undone,” Pachter says. “If you can save someone embarrassment, please do.”–Robert DiGiacomo, for Yahoo! HotJobs

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Body Language Can Make Or Break A Job Interview /blog/body-language-break-job-interview/ /blog/body-language-break-job-interview/#comments Thu, 22 Jul 2010 18:42:52 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=4979 Are you looking for a job? You have to use your body! Savvy job seekers know how important choosing the right words is when we communicate with prospective employers--but what about non-verbal communication? "You could be saying how great you are," says image consultant and "Hello Job! How to Psych Up, Suit Up, & Show Up" author Alison Craig, "but your body could be giving your true feelings away." Mark Bowden, the author of "Winning Body Language" agrees with Craig--and with the highly regarded Mehrabian communication study, which found that if what's coming out of your mouth doesn't match what your body is saying, your audience is more likely to believe your body. Here's some expert advice on how to effectively let your body do the talking in a job interview:

Body Language Can Make Or Break A Job Interview is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Are you looking for a job? You have to use your body!

Savvy job seekers know how important choosing the right words is when we communicate with prospective employers–but what about non-verbal communication?

“You could be saying how great you are,” says image consultant and “Hello Job! How to Psych Up, Suit Up, & Show Up” author Alison Craig, “but your body could be giving your true feelings away.” Mark Bowden, the author of “Winning Body Language” agrees with Craig–and with the highly regarded Mehrabian communication study, which found that if what’s coming out of your mouth doesn’t match what your body is saying, your audience is more likely to believe your body.

Here’s some expert advice on how to effectively let your body do the talking in a job interview:

Making a great entrance
Craig and Bowden agree that the interview starts even before you get to the interview room: “You don’t know who could be in the parking lot with you, looking at you from a window, or standing next to you in the elevator,” says Craig. “Your body should tell anyone who might be watching that you’re confident and calm. It’s not the time to be frantically searching through your portfolio for printouts of your resume.”

Show your good side
Hiring managers often ask receptionists for their take on people who come to the office for interviews, so Bowden suggests letting them observe you without letting on that you know they’re watching. “Sit with your profile to them,” he says. “It makes them feel comfortable, and if they’re comfortable, they’re more likely to form a good impression.”

Craig suggests trying to predict the direction your interviewer will come from, so you can sit facing that direction. It’ll make the greeting more graceful.

Also, says Craig, don’t have so much stuff on your lap that you’re clumsily moving everything aside when you’re called. You want to rise gracefully, without dropping things, so you can smoothly greet the person coming to get you.

(Get tips on crafting a great resume that will earn you a job interview.)

Shake it–don’t break it
Job interviews mean handshakes–so what are the secrets to the perfect handshake? The overly aggressive shake (or “death grip,” as Craig calls it) can be as off-putting as the limp handshake, so practice with a friend before the interview to find the right balance.

You’re going to be shaking with your right hand, so prepare by arranging your belongings on your left side. Offer your hand with the palm slightly up so that your interviewer’s hand covers yours. “It’s a sign that you’re giving them status,” says Bowden. And never cover the other person’s hand with the hand you’re not shaking with–it can be interpreted as a sign of domination.”

Important steps
The walk to the interview is the perfect time to use body language: “Always follow that person, whether the person is the hiring manager or an assistant, to show you understand the protocol. You’re saying, ‘I’m the job candidate, and you’re the company representative–I follow your lead.'” Bowen adds that you should try to “mirror” that person’s tempo and demeanor. “It shows you can easily fit into the environment.”

At the interview desk
In the interview room, It’s OK to place a slim portfolio on the table, especially if you’ll be presenting its contents, but put your other belongings on the floor beside you. Holding a briefcase or handbag on your lap will make you seem as though you’re trying to create a barrier around yourself, cautions Craig.

Avoid leaning forward, which makes you appear closed off, Bowden says. Instead, he advises sitting up straight and displaying your neck, chest, and stomach area–to signal that you’re open.

When gesturing with your hands, Craig says, you should always keep them above the desk and below the collarbone: “Any higher and you’re going to appear frantic.”

Bowden advises that you keep your hands even lower, in what he calls the “truth plane”–an area that fans out 180 degrees from your navel. “Gesturing from here communicates that you’re centered, controlled, and calm–and that you want to help.”

It’s fine to sit about a foot away from the table so that your gestures are visible, he says.

The art of departing
At the end of the interview, gather your belongings calmly, rise smoothly, smile, and nod your head. If shaking hands with everyone in the room isn’t convenient, at least shake hands with the hiring manager and the person who brought you to the interview space.

You may be tempted to try to read your interviewers’ body language for signals about how the interview went, but don’t, cautions Bowden–because they’re likely trained not to give away too much. He sums up, “Don’t allow any thoughts into your mind that may [cause you to] leave the interview in a negative way.”–Robert Ordona for Yahoo! HotJobs

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Job-Search Desperate Measures /blog/jobsearch-desperate-measures/ /blog/jobsearch-desperate-measures/#comments Tue, 06 Jul 2010 16:49:36 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=4867 Attention-getting tricks: some bomb, but some get the job. It's still tough out there, with too many candidates chasing too few openings. You may have heard experts say that job seekers need to stand out from the crowd and never give up. But what's bold and inspired to one hiring manager can seem obnoxious--or insane--to another. Do attention-getting stunts work? And how have some job seekers gone too far?

Job-Search Desperate Measures is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Attention-getting tricks: some bomb, but some get the job.

It’s still tough out there, with too many candidates chasing too few openings. You may have heard experts say that job seekers need to stand out from the crowd and never give up. But what’s bold and inspired to one hiring manager can seem obnoxious–or insane–to another. Do attention-getting stunts work? And how have some job seekers gone too far?

Stalking via social media
Social media has an etiquette that some users haven’t mastered, according to Michelle Madhok, CEO and editor of SheFinds.com: “I use social media to find candidates, but one job seeker kept contacting me on various sites, wanting to know if I had made a decision,” Madhok says. “My advice: Don’t keep messaging on Twitter asking for a job. One inquiry is okay; otherwise, remember the rule Don’t call us, we’ll call you.'”

Seemingly, that rule also applies to direct-message tweets.

Then there’s the job candidate who “friended” Berit Brogaard, associate professor of philosophy and psychology at the University of Missouri, St. Louis. “I accepted the friend request. He then decided to ‘like’ most of my links and give them status updates until we decided on a different candidate.”

Making the resume too unique
Executive recruiter Kim Bishop has seen a variety of wacky queries, including one large package containing the message “Will work for food,” and resumes comparing themselves to Broadway shows and to NCAA tournaments. “One person asked whether he should send an employer confetti in an envelope. I said, ‘Think about it: would you want confetti all over your desk?'”

Before you send a crazy resume, put yourself in the recipient’s shoes.

Standing on the corner with a sign
Betsy Richards, director of personal brand strategy at Kaplan University, shared the story of a college graduate who became impatient when he hadn’t heard back from a company (not Kaplan) and took it to the next level. “He didn’t call the hiring manager, nor did he try to reach out to the company using the typical methods. Instead, he made a big poster saying, ‘Hire Me! I can help your company,’ and stood on the street corner of the company’s offices for a week.” Did he get the job? “Not to my knowledge,” Richards says.

Sending very creepy letters
Author and productivity consultant Barry Maher relates the story of a PR job seeker who got too much attention–the wrong kind. “He went to the website and found the names and contact info of everyone he figured would be making the final decision on the hiring. Then, cutting out letters from a newspaper, he sent each board member a series of letters. The first had just his first name, ‘John.’ The second read, ‘John Smith.’ Then ‘John Smith Is,’ ‘John Smith Is Going,’ ‘John Smith Is Going to,’ and ‘John Smith Is Going to Blow.’ Then, apparently thinking he was clever enough to avoid creating a problem message, the next letter added two words rather than one. It read, ‘John Smith Is Going to Blow You Away!’ Which is when the police showed up at his door.”

Using food bribes
Jim Hornickel, director of training and development at Bold New Directions, recalled hearing about a colleague who was sent a three-layered, lavishly decorated cake with a wedge missing. “The accompanying note read, ‘I am the missing piece of your team’s puzzle.'” In this case, the candidate did get the job.

Can wacky work?
Abby Kohut, the author of “Absolutely Abby’s 101 Job Search Secrets,” shares another food-bribe story. “A friend of mine in marketing sent 10 chocolate shoes to hiring managers saying, ‘I’d like to get my foot in the door’–and received 10 requests for an interview.”

The cake and chocolate-shoe examples show that, once in a while, job-search stunts work. But they must be applied very carefully. “Being one notch overboard can work to differentiate yourself in this highly competitive job market, but you really have to know the industry, the company, and even the hiring manager’s norms,” says Hornickel.

Career coach Bettina Seidman advises sending little “extras” when they are relevant to the job: “If a graphic designer sends a fabulous storyboard or another example of his or her work along with a resume, then that can work. If a labor-relations expert sends a copy of a new collective bargaining that he or she negotiated, that’s good. However, stalkers or flower senders or applicants who send their resumes in a huge envelope–none of this works. If a candidate shows signs of over-the-top actions or mental illness, they lose.”

And most hiring managers will tell that if you don’t have the goods, all the stunts in the world won’t land you the job. “There are very basic things that many people forget about in their quest to stand out: a well-written resume, a well-written intro email that is concise and highlights the experience and skills for the role, and an intro from someone who knows the person are always helpful,” Bishop says.

Also on Yahoo! HotJobs:

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Resumes For The Digital Age /blog/resumes-digital-age/ /blog/resumes-digital-age/#comments Thu, 24 Jun 2010 21:33:41 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=4794 7 tips for mastering keywords and electronic formatting When you're applying for a job, you work hard to make sure your resume will command the attention of the first person who reads it. But it's increasingly likely that the first reader of your resume won't be a person at all. Inundated with hundreds--or thousands--of resumes for some positions, many companies are using technology to streamline resume screening.

Resumes For The Digital Age is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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7 tips for mastering keywords and electronic formatting

When you’re applying for a job, you work hard to make sure your resume will command the attention of the first person who reads it. But it’s increasingly likely that the first reader of your resume won’t be a person at all.

Inundated with hundreds–or thousands–of resumes for some positions, many companies are using technology to streamline resume screening.

“Any time you submit a resume, you should expect to have your resume scanned for keywords,” says Chandlee Bryan, career coach and owner of Best Fit Forward.

Companies use applicant-tracking systems to electronically sort through and store resumes. The systems search for keywords, sort the resumes, and give hiring mangers the most-promising candidates.

Although designing a resume that will impress both a computer and human readers may seem intimidating, there are some advantages.

“It used to be that when a recruiter said, ‘We’ll keep your resume on file,’ it meant it was going in the garbage can,” says Barbara Safani, owner of Career Solvers and the author of “Happy About My Resume.” Now, they may actually mean it.

Experts offer these tips for making sure your resume stands out electronically and in person:

Choose the right keywords. Hiring managers and recruiters will use the applicant-tracking system to search for keywords related to the job they’re looking to fill. To make your resume rise to the top of the list, you need the right keywords.

“Review the job posting for the position and try to mirror that language,” Safani says. Find words and phrases that describe what the company is looking for and use them as much as possible.

Use variations of keywords. Some systems check how often a particular word or variation on a word is used. For instance, if you’re looking for a job in accounting, use both “accountant” and “accounting.”

Use keywords smartly. Some resumes have a keyword section that simply lists keywords for the computer to pick up. Others include a keyword list in white text on white paper, so that it is read by the computer but not seen by a human reader. Safani and Bryan don’t recommend these techniques, though, because although they might help your resume get picked out initially, they can hurt you when a human reader takes a look.

“You don’t want to write something that doesn’t read well just because you’re trying to get the word ‘accountant’ in 10 different ways,” Safani says.

Make your job title generic. If most companies would call you a business analyst but your title is “process improvement specialist,” consider listing “business analyst” on your resume (and perhaps putting your actual title in parentheses after it). Do not, of course, give yourself a loftier title than you actually have.

Don’t go overboard. It can be useful to have a list of key skills on your resume, both for search engines to scan and to give human readers an idea of your strengths. But Bryan recommends listing no more than nine: “I don’t think it fools anyone if it’s not very deep.”

Use text only. If you’re asked to paste your resume into a website text box, make sure you use a text-only version. If you copy and paste from a Word document, for example, some characters and formatting may not translate properly (em dashes, bullets, indentations, italic or bold type, and even quotation marks, for instance)–making your resume illegible (for machines and people). You may want to save a copy of your resume as a plain-text file and make any adjustments in that file before you paste the text (plain text is offered as an option when you save a file in almost all word processing programs).

Follow directions. Every system is different, so the most important thing is to follow the directions on the site that’s accepting your resume, Bryan says.–Margaret Steen, for Yahoo! HotJobs

(For more advice on crafting a great resume, read “5 Resume Items That Can’t Wait for the Interview,” or check out all Yahoo! HotJobs articles about resumes.
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Fun Ways To Beef Up Your Resume /blog/fun-ways-beef-resume/ /blog/fun-ways-beef-resume/#comments Fri, 28 May 2010 20:56:08 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=4613 Enjoyable activities that can help you advance your career The word "fun" isn't usually associated with looking for a job. Even in the best of circumstances, being unemployed or under-employed can be scary and stressful. But in any job search, keeping a positive attitude is important. So in addition to refining your resume and assiduously applying for jobs, consider these pursuits that can not only be lots of fun but also make just about any candidate more attractive to hiring managers. (Most can be done for free or on the cheap.) What's more, most of these activities involve meeting new people--and therefore put you in new networking opportunities. Meeting people outside of your normal social and professional spheres is an excellent way to broaden the reach of your job search.

Fun Ways To Beef Up Your Resume is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Enjoyable activities that can help you advance your career

The word “fun” isn’t usually associated with looking for a job. Even in the best of circumstances, being unemployed or under-employed can be scary and stressful. But in any job search, keeping a positive attitude is important. So in addition to refining your resume and assiduously applying for jobs, consider these pursuits that can not only be lots of fun but also make just about any candidate more attractive to hiring managers. (Most can be done for free or on the cheap.)

What’s more, most of these activities involve meeting new people–and therefore put you in new networking opportunities. Meeting people outside of your normal social and professional spheres is an excellent way to broaden the reach of your job search.

1. Study a language
Even knowing only the basics of a second language can be a boon in many jobs–for instance, greeting foreign clients in their own tongue makes a great first impression. And most language classes involve fun socializing activities and learning about foreign cultures.

Fluency takes time, but just telling an employer that you’re studying a language can demonstrate self-discipline and a desire to learn new things, according to career expert Jason Seiden, the author of “Super Staying Power: What You Need to Become Valuable & Resilient at Work.”

2. Enroll in an acting or improvisation workshop
“I definitely advocate taking an improv class,” says Seiden. “I’ve done this myself … and I learned to work across an incredibly diverse group of people, I learned to become more adaptive to my environment, and I got some great stories to use to break the ice with new people.”

These types of workshops can also be very beneficial for people who fear public speaking. (Joining a Toastmasters club is another fun way to become a more effective speaker. Read more in “Mastering the Art of Public Speaking.”)

3. Learn something new
“Take classes at your local college, online, or through job-training programs,” suggests Debra Davenport, business coach and founder of Identity IQ. “Employers want knowledge workers with top skills in the areas of technology, social media, communication, leadership, coaching, budgeting, marketing, and global commerce.” (In addition, “fun” classes–like photography–may come in handy in surprising ways. After you get your financial-services job, say, the company may urgently need someone to take photos at an investor event–and you’ll be able to save the day.)

4. Turn a hobby into a business
Enjoy cooking? Gardening? Crafting? Davenport suggests looking into services provided by the Small Business Administration for ideas and guidance on turning your pastime into profits. And even if your side business doesn’t become lucrative, your entrepreneurial initiative may impress the hiring managers in your future.

5. Volunteer
Jay Block, the author of “101 Best Ways to Land a Job in Troubled Times,” recommends volunteering as a way to gain confidence and strengthen your resume: You could volunteer to teach what you know–for instance, if you’re good at sales, an organization like Junior Achievement might be a good fit. You could turn a hobby into a volunteer opportunity–for instance, if you enjoy playing the piano, you could schedule song nights at a local retirement center. Or you could even travel to an area that could use your help or skills–for instance, to work with Habitat for Humanity.

6. Write
Many career experts suggest developing a blog that focuses on a hobby or your industry. Or, suggests Block, you could offer to write a column for a free local newspaper. These are not only enjoyable ways to express yourself but also great ways to promote yourself as an expert and establish a well-rounded online presence.

7. Get physical
“Sign up for yoga or Pilates–or work on becoming an instructor or a certified fitness trainer,” suggests Block. “At a time where too many people are unhealthy and depressed, this can be fun and healthy and look great on a resume.”

8. Get social
“Become a social networking junkie–not to just pass time socially, but to collect a huge amount of contacts and to build solid relationships that would be valuable to a prospective employer,” says Block. “Networking and relationship building are critical skills today.”

(For more on effective networking, read “How to Social Network Your Way into a Job.”)

9. Explore a new career
Block suggests “job shadowing” as one interesting way to learn about a new field: “Job shadowing is when you follow someone around to learn how they do their job,” he explains. “It’s an excellent opportunity to learn new skills and get advice from professionals in industries or venues you hope to break into.”

10. Be creative
If you’re in the midst of a period of unemployment, you can expect hiring managers to ask how you’ve spent your time away from the 9-to-5 routine. With some creative thinking, you can turn just about any hobby or learning experience into a resume or interview asset. According to Seiden, “The most important thing about resume boosters is not what they are, but how you present them. When you’re interested, focused, and self-motivated, nearly anything can be an asset.”–Charles Purdy, Yahoo! HotJobs
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9 Ways To Ensure You Don’t Get The Job /blog/9-ways-ensure-job/ /blog/9-ways-ensure-job/#comments Thu, 27 May 2010 16:04:42 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=4603 Hiring managers share simple ways to make a terrible impression in a job interview. Different jobs require different qualities in an employee--so what a hiring manager is looking for will vary from interview to interview. But there are some behaviors that decision-makers agree are especially annoying. We asked several hiring managers for their interviewee pet peeves--and for their take on what a job applicant can do to get his or her resume tossed into the recycling bin. If you're looking for a job, be warned.

9 Ways To Ensure You Don’t Get The Job is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Hiring managers share simple ways to make a terrible impression in a job interview.

Different jobs require different qualities in an employee–so what a hiring manager is looking for will vary from interview to interview. But there are some behaviors that decision-makers agree are especially annoying. We asked several hiring managers for their interviewee pet peeves–and for their take on what a job applicant can do to get his or her resume tossed into the recycling bin.

If you’re looking for a job, be warned.

Send a follow-up “thx 4 mtg” text message.
Kristin Terdik, inside sales support director of Technekes in Charlotte, N.C., laments the lost art of professional thank you notes that feature actual words on real paper: “Candidates directly out of school think they can send you a text message or an invitation to a social networking site, and that counts as a thank-you note,” she says. “It doesn’t count, but so many entry-level people are doing it now I’m forced to cut them some slack.”

Peggy Rosenblatt, senior vice president for AKRF, Inc., an environmental planning and engineering consulting firm, is less forgiving. “If I don’t get a well-written thank-you note as a follow up, they’re out.”

Spam your resume.
Maria McGuinness, a hiring manager in central New York for a small manufacturer, says that too many applicants repeatedly apply for the same position and cite different websites where the job was posted. Other managers are annoyed when candidates apply for every position in the company–both behaviors cause unnecessary work for hiring managers. “While I realize the job market is tight and people are desperate, spamming your resume is a very bad idea,” McGuinness says.

Ask, “What does your company do?”
“If candidates don’t have the curiosity or interest to do their homework on our website, then I am not interested in them,” says Rosenblatt.

Bring the family.
Erin Duddy, a recruiter at a small staffing firm in Raleigh, has been unpleasantly surprised when a candidate brings a baby or a child to an interview. “If you absolutely must bring children to the company, at least clear it ahead of time,” she recommends.

A hiring manager at a Florida hospital adds that bringing a spouse or parent to the interview–or letting a loved one negotiate your salary and benefits for you–is one way to ensure you’ll get no salary and benefits.

Use your cell phone in the meeting.
Hiring managers say that they’re seeing more candidates use their cell phones to send text messages or take personal calls during interviews–but that doesn’t make the behavior any more acceptable.

John M. O’Connor, president of Career Pro Inc., adds that even using electronics in the waiting room can reflect negatively. “Executive assistants often tell the boss everything, and if they see you constantly using your PDA, it may give the impression that you’re unfocused or easily distracted.”

Don’t smile. Or laugh too much. Or cry.
O’Connor says that a smile and a sense of humor are crucial in interviews, no matter what the job may be. “Hiring managers have told me, ‘this person is great on paper–but he’s so intense and humorless in person, I would never want to go to lunch with him,'” he says.

On the other hand, Frank Papa, operating partner at H.I.G. Capital in North Carolina, warns against undue giddiness. “When a candidate laughs all the time … it says they are trying too hard to be accepted and be liked.”

Then again, laughter may be better than tears. “I hate interviewing someone who is so nervous they cannot answer the questions and then break down and cry,” says Isabella Tagore, a recruiting consultant based in southern California.

Come with your own beverages.
Many hiring managers dislike it when people bring their own take-out cups of coffee to drink during an interview, according to career strategist Barbara Safani. It can come across as far too informal. And if you bring a child’s Hello Kitty lunch box containing utensils to brew your own tea, as one candidate did when meeting Terdik, you will be memorable–but not in a good way.–Larry Buhl, for Yahoo! HotJobs

(Want to find out how to recover from an interview gone wrong? Read “After the Recruiter Says No.” Then restart your job search today.)
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Breaking Out Of Long-Term Unemployment /blog/breaking-longterm-unemployment/ /blog/breaking-longterm-unemployment/#comments Thu, 22 Apr 2010 16:47:21 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=4353 Long-term unemployment can wreak havoc on a person's sense of self-worth and well-being. Worse, big resume gaps, or current unemployment, may also mark a job seeker as "damaged goods" and make a long job search even longer. "I wouldn't say the bias [against hiring the unemployed] is pervasive, but too many hiring managers don't realize that the world has changed and that people have had a hard time finding jobs through no fault of their own," says Cheryl Ferguson, president of Recruiter's Studio and recruiter for Decision Toolbox. Throw in the towel? Don't even think about it, career experts say. They suggest these practical steps to help even the most discouraged unemployed job seeker get motivated and beat the odds.

Breaking Out Of Long-Term Unemployment is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Long-term unemployment can wreak havoc on a person’s sense of self-worth and well-being. Worse, big resume gaps, or current unemployment, may also mark a job seeker as “damaged goods” and make a long job search even longer.

“I wouldn’t say the bias [against hiring the unemployed] is pervasive, but too many hiring managers don’t realize that the world has changed and that people have had a hard time finding jobs through no fault of their own,” says Cheryl Ferguson, president of Recruiter’s Studio and recruiter for Decision Toolbox.

Throw in the towel? Don’t even think about it, career experts say. They suggest these practical steps to help even the most discouraged unemployed job seeker get motivated and beat the odds.

1. Check your mental attitudes.
It’s a vicious circle: the longer you’re out of work, the more anxious, insecure, or depressed you may be–and this can hurt your chances of landing a job. “Attitude is a crucial part of the job search, and unfortunately it’s easy to be caught up in negative mental self-talk, especially with the media telling us how terrible everything is,” says Helaine Z. Harris, a Los Angeles-based psychotherapist.

If anxiety or depression is significant, don’t be afraid to seek counseling. If that’s not an option, simple calming breaths and even meditation can be effective, Harris says. “It’s essential to relax and clear the mind, so you’ll know the right actions to take and be able to magnetize the opportunities you want.” Connecting with nurturing friends and sharing your feelings about being unemployed can also help if you’re feeling isolated.

2. Move your body.
There’s documented evidence that physical exercise improves mental health and reduces anxiety. And a gym regimen or even daily walks around the neighborhood can help your job-search efforts by adding structure to your day. “Regular exercise creates more self-discipline and shows that you can do hard things, which makes it easier to handle tasks like making difficult phone calls,” says Penelope Trunk, creator of the social network site Brazen Careerist.

3. Step away from the computer.
Job boards and social networking sites such as Twitter can be helpful, but they are not the only ways to connect. And relying on them can perpetuate the unemployment “hermit” trap. “If you’ve been out of circulation for a while, you have to remind people you’re still around,” Ferguson says. “You’re also likely to be a little rusty in networking, so it’s important to get out once or twice a week, at least, for a face-to-face meeting, lunch, or networking event.”

4. Re-examine employment strategies and tactics.
With a clearer mind, an energized body, and a fuller social calendar, you can better gauge the effectiveness of your search. Career coach and author Dr. Marty Nemko urges unemployed job hunters to not assume they’ve been doing everything right:

“Are you really spending 30 hours a week job searching? Do you have a job-search buddy, so you can be accountable to each other? Are you active in your professional association, in-person and online? After an interview, have you sent a proposal that explains what you’d do for the employer? Have you followed up relentlessly with warm leads? If you’ve done all of those things and still aren’t getting a job, you probably need to change your job target to a more in-demand job title or a lower-level job,” says Nemko.

5. Fill the resume gap.
A resume should be a history of things you’ve accomplished, not necessarily a chronology of things you’ve been paid for, according to Trunk. With that philosophy, there’s no reason to have a gap in your resume. “There are very few professions where you have to be on the payroll in order to do the work,” Trunk says. “If you’re a programmer, write a patch on your own time. If you’re a shoe designer, design your own shoes. Just do it. You’ll have something to show on the resume, and you’ll be taking back your power.” (See all HotJobs articles about resumes.)

6. Don’t be defensive about unemployment.
You’ve been out of work for a while. So what? So have many of the other candidates. “Don’t hide the fact you’ve been unemployed,” says John M. McKee, job coach and founder of BussinessSuccessCoach.net. “People won’t hire others who are prickly.”

McKee adds that you might need to stop saying the word “unemployed” if the word is getting in your way. Trunk agrees: “When someone asks what you’re doing now, don’t say you’re out of work, because you’re not. You’re just not getting paid. Talk about the projects you’ve done and what you’re learning, and then mention, ‘I’m looking for a paid position like this.'”–Larry Buhl, for Yahoo! HotJobs
Also on Yahoo! HotJobs:

Breaking Out Of Long-Term Unemployment is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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Can I Ask For A Raise Yet? /blog/raise/ /blog/raise/#comments Fri, 26 Mar 2010 16:16:37 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=4145 If you've stayed employed during the recent recession, there's a good chance you haven't been getting salary increases. You may even have taken a pay cut. And you've probably been told--or you've at least told yourself--that you should be grateful to have a job at all. But now that economists are talking about the end of the recession, a question arises: When is it safe to ask for a raise? The answer is that you may be able to ask right now--as long as you do your homework "You might be told no," says Marianne Adoradio, a career counselor in Silicon Valley. But even if you don't get an immediate raise, asking--appropriately--might still be beneficial. "You're displaying professionalism, assertiveness, and initiative. It shows that you won't be taken advantage of when times change." Adoradio and other experts offer these four tips for deciding how and when to ask for an increase in pay:

Can I Ask For A Raise Yet? is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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If you’ve stayed employed during the recent recession, there’s a good chance you haven’t been getting salary increases. You may even have taken a pay cut. And you’ve probably been told–or you’ve at least told yourself–that you should be grateful to have a job at all.

But now that economists are talking about the end of the recession, a question arises: When is it safe to ask for a raise?

The answer is that you may be able to ask right now–as long as you do your homework

“You might be told no,” says Marianne Adoradio, a career counselor in Silicon Valley. But even if you don’t get an immediate raise, asking–appropriately–might still be beneficial. “You’re displaying professionalism, assertiveness, and initiative. It shows that you won’t be taken advantage of when times change.”

Adoradio and other experts offer these four tips for deciding how and when to ask for an increase in pay:

Arm yourself with facts.
You need to know how your company and industry are doing: Is your company meeting its financial goals? What is the current market rate for someone doing your job?

Unofficial information, such as whether anyone in the company has been getting raises, can also be helpful if you’re able to find out discreetly.

Finally, it’s important to know “where you stand in the eyes of your manager and the management team,” Adoradio says. If you’re considered indispensible, you’ll have a stronger case.

Choose the right time.
As you gather your information about the company’s performance, you may realize that it’s not the best time to ask for a pay increase.

“I wouldn’t do it if they’re still cutting things left and right,” says Kathy Ullrich, an executive recruiter.

Asking for a raise while the company is in the middle of layoffs, for example, could send a signal that “you’re not tuned in to the business,” says Leslie G. Griffen, a Missouri-based HR consultant and career coach.

Phrase your request carefully.
Adoradio suggests presenting a two-part request that highlights both your knowledge of the company’s situation and your contributions–for instance: “I realize that the economic situation of the company is improving. Our department has been working extra hard, and my last performance review was exceptional. I’m wondering if I could have a five percent pay increase.”

If you have market data for your job position to back up your request, Ullrich suggests phrasing your request something like this: “I know that I joined the company during a softening economy. I was hoping that we could use this next year to get me closer to the norm.”

Have a backup plan.
If a raise isn’t possible now, lay the groundwork for the future. Ask for feedback on your work so you know where to improve.

Griffen suggests saying something like, “I’m disappointed that it looks like increases are not going to be in place this year, but I would like some feedback on my value to the organization.”

Adoradio recommends also asking your manager about the company goals that need to be met before management will start considering raises.Margaret Steen, for Yahoo! HotJobs


Also on Yahoo! HotJobs:

Can I Ask For A Raise Yet? is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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After The Recruiter Says No: How To Handle Job-Search Rejections /blog/recruiter-handle-jobsearch-rejections/ /blog/recruiter-handle-jobsearch-rejections/#comments Tue, 23 Mar 2010 18:36:09 +0000 http://www.glassdoor.com/blog/?p=4103 You had high hopes for this job: The job requirements matched your skill set perfectly. You aced your interview questions. And you imagined hearing those sweet words so many of us long to hear: "You're hired." Instead, you got another job rejection letter. According to recent U.S. Labor Department data, 5.5 unemployed Americans, on average, are vying for each job opening--so most interviews will end in rejection. And that can be a crushing blow--but it can also be a career-making moment. When you don't get the job, what should your next steps be?

After The Recruiter Says No: How To Handle Job-Search Rejections is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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You had high hopes for this job: The job requirements matched your skill set perfectly. You aced your interview questions. And you imagined hearing those sweet words so many of us long to hear:

“You’re hired.”

Instead, you got another job rejection letter. According to recent U.S. Labor Department data, 5.5 unemployed Americans, on average, are vying for each job opening–so most interviews will end in rejection.

And that can be a crushing blow–but it can also be a career-making moment. When you don’t get the job, what should your next steps be?

Don’t beat yourself up about it.
John Kador, the author of “301 Best Questions to Ask on Your Interview,” second edition (McGraw-Hill), recommends you try to learn from each rejection–while understanding that it may not be your fault. “Sometimes you didn’t do anything wrong,” he says. “Someone else was more qualified or more connected. Companies sometimes go through the motions of interviewing applicants when they’ve already selected a candidate.”

While the experience is still fresh in your mind, writing down what you’ve learned may help you put a positive spin on the experience–and give you something to refer to later, according to Lewis Lin, of SeattleInterviewCoach.com.

Be gracious in defeat.
How you conduct yourself after a rejection letter can determine whether that recruiter will consider you again–or perhaps refer you to another recruiter. Liz Lynch, the author of “Smart Networking” (McGraw-Hill), says, “Send a handwritten card thanking them again for their time, reiterating your interest in the company, and expressing your hope that they’ll keep you in mind for future positions. And whatever you do, do not diss them on your blog!”

Ask for feedback.
Kador advises saying that you accept the recruiter’s decision before you ask for feedback: “No one will talk to you if they think you’re going to argue or appeal.”

If you don’t trust yourself to keep your cool, you may want to skip asking for feedback. If you do ask, email is the best medium. “Telephoning is probably too intrusive,” says Lynch. “And whatever feedback you hear, don’t be defensive.”

Lin cautions that “you’ll get canned responses most of the time” due to fears about legal issues, but he recommends phrasing your request for feedback like this: “If you don’t mind me asking, do you have any feedback on how I can improve for future interviews?”

He adds, “You want to keep the conversation as professional as possible. Who knows? You could be their backup candidate.”

Keep trying.
In most cases, you should actively pursue new openings at the company. The phrase “we’ll keep your resume on file” is usually an attempt to soften the rejection, according to Kador, who says you should keep applying for relevant jobs and staying in touch with the recruiters you’ve met. “If a posting says no calls,’ I wouldn’t call,” he says. “But that doesn’t mean you can’t write.”

Bring the recruiter into your professional network.
If, down the road, you can help the interviewer or recruiter by recommending a candidate, for instance, or forwarding a relevant article, Kador says you should “go for it– make yourself known as a resource.”

Lynch, too, recommends keeping in touch with the hiring manager in a “low-key way” and says that, when you do land a position, you should write him or her a note and include your new business card. Then you can send the manager an invitation to connect on LinkedIn so you can easily stay in touch.–Charles Purdy, Yahoo! HotJobs

Also on Yahoo! HotJobs:

After The Recruiter Says No: How To Handle Job-Search Rejections is a post from: Glassdoor Blog

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