Morningstar Employee Benefit: Vacation & Paid Time Off | Glassdoor

Morningstar Vacation & Paid Time Off

Updated Feb 11, 2016

72 employees reported this benefit

3.9
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Employer Summary

Morningstar offers a paid time off policy to employees which covers vacation, sick days and personal day. 


Employer Verified
Available to US-based employees (Change location)

Employee Comments

Showing 1–10 of 12
  • Dec 26, 2017
    StarStarStarStarStar Former Information Security Analyst in Chicago, Illinois

    Unlimited with your managers approval

  • Apr 20, 2017
    StarStarStarStarStarEmployee

    As a long-term employee (10+ years), I'm less enamored of the "unlimited" vacation policy. In practice, it seems like most people take about three weeks of vacation time each year. That's generous for newer employees, but as several others have noted, less time than you'd get with a conventional policy if you've been here 10 years or longer. In theory, the six-week sabbatical every four years adds, on average, another week and a half of time off each year. But there seems to be a growing trend of employees being expected to take a "half sabbatical." While I sincerely believe that the time-off policy was created to be generous and flexible, I'm also convinced that it results in less total vacation days than a more-conventional approach.

  • Apr 20, 2017
    StarStarStarStarStarEmployee

    As a long-term employee (10+ years), I'm less enamored of the "unlimited" vacation policy. In practice, it seems like most people take about three weeks of vacation time each year. That's generous for newer employees, but as several others have noted, less time than you'd get with a conventional policy if you've been here 10 years or longer. In theory, the six-week sabbatical every four years adds, on average, another week and a half of time off each year. But there seems to be a growing trend of employees being expected to take a "half sabbatical." While I sincerely believe that the time-off policy was created to be generous and flexible, I'm also convinced that it results in less total vacation days than a more-conventional approach.

  • Apr 20, 2017
    StarStarStarStarStarEmployee

    As a long-term employee (10+ years), I'm less enamored of the "unlimited" vacation policy. In practice, it seems like most people take about three weeks of vacation time each year. That's generous for newer employees, but as several others have noted, less time than you'd get with a conventional policy if you've been here 10 years or longer. In theory, the six-week sabbatical every four years adds, on average, another week and a half of time off each year. But there seems to be a growing trend of employees being expected to take a "half sabbatical." While I sincerely believe that the time-off policy was created to be generous and flexible, I'm also convinced that it results in less total vacation days than a more-conventional approach.

  • Feb 17, 2017
    StarStarStarStarStar Current Product Marketing Manager in Chicago, Illinois

    Unlimited vacay and people are really good about it. Also, sabbaticals offered every 4 years.

  • Nov 18, 2016
    StarStarStarStarStar Former Employee in Oakland, Maryland

    3 weeks sick/vacation total. It was all paid, but you had to track what you used for sick and how much you had left for vacation.

  • Feb 17, 2016
    StarStarStarStarStarEmployee

    Unlimited vacation HOWEVER be wary that this depends on your department. If you are in research, nobody is going to pick up your companies during earnings so you are restricted. Sabbatical every 4 years. Again, if in research you cannot take the full 6 weeks, must take two 3 week vacations.

  • Dec 26, 2015
    StarStarStarStarStar Current Client Solutions Consultant in Chicago, Illinois

    No vacation policy means unlimited PTO if your team OKs it (which they always do).

  • Nov 06, 2015
    StarStarStarStarStar Current Employee in Chicago, Illinois

    We don't have specific number of days. They just generally say "take what you need" which roughly equates to 3 weeks a year. Just get your manager's approval.

  • Oct 27, 2015
    StarStarStarStarStar Current Project Manager in Chicago, Illinois

    Unlimited vacation, so no tracking time off or sick days. As long as you get your work done and your manager approves it.


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