What does a Truck Driver do?

Truck drivers earn their living by driving a truck and transporting goods and materials. They typically drive a route that takes them to and from retail and distribution centers or manufacturing plants. As long and short distance haulers of goods and materials, they provide essential services for industrialized nations. They move cargo by way of tractor-trailers and know how to connect and disconnect cabs from trailers and basic repair skills including changing a tire. They are trained to operate the vehicle up or down a steep grade while keeping the brakes protected from overheating and keeping loads from shifting on curves.

Truck drivers operate multi-gear transmission vehicles and are educated in safely maneuvering the vehicle and its cargo while staying mindful to its size. They are expected to track their long hours in a log book and get merchandise to a final destination safely and timely. They are responsible for manifest sheets that they check to match their load, and they load and unload their truck. There is no education requirement to be a truck driver, but candidates must be 21 years of age and take the Department of Transportation physical, meet or exceed the medical requirements set by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. Truck drivers must also complete commercial driver's license training.

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Average Years of Experience

0 - 1
4%
2 - 4
2%
5 - 7
0%
8+
94%

Common Skill Sets

CDL Hazmat
Load Unload
Dedicated CDL
Air Induction
English Language
Strong WORK Ethic
Drop and Hook
Box Truck

Truck Driver Seniority Levels

L2
Truck Driver
$56,444/yr
L3
Delivery Driver
24% made the transition
Bus Driver
9% made the transition
See Career Path

Truck Driver Salaries

Average Base Pay

$56,444 /yr
Same as national average
Not including cash compensation
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$36K
Median: $56K
$88K
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Glassdoor Estimated Salary

Truck Driver Jobs

Truck Driver Interviews