Compare Defenders of Wildlife vs US Fish and Wildlife Service BETA

See how US Fish and Wildlife Service vs. Defenders of Wildlife compare on employee ratings, job openings, CEO approval, business outlook and more.
Defenders of Wildlife company icon

Defenders of Wildlife

Employee Ratings

Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
2.5
(based on 48 reviews)
Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
4.0
(based on 83 reviews)
Career Opportunities
Career Opportunities
2.2
Career Opportunities
3.1
Compensation & Benefits
Compensation & Benefits
2.3
Compensation & Benefits
3.7
Work-life balance
Work-life balance
2.7
Work-life balance
3.9
Senior Management
Senior Management
2.2
Senior Management
3.0
Culture & Values
Culture & Values
2.5
Culture & Values
3.5
CEO Approval
CEO Approval
Defenders of Wildlife Ceo Jamie Rappaport Clark
39%
39%Jamie Rappaport Clark
CEO Approval
US Fish and Wildlife Service Ceo Dan Ashe
80%
80%Dan Ashe
% Recommend to a friend
% Recommend to a friend
33%
% Recommend to a friend
72%
Positive Business Outlook
Positive Business Outlook
38%
Positive Business Outlook
53%

Salaries

Salaries for similar jobs
Salaries for similar jobs
Coordinator6 Salaries
$38,161/yr
Policy Associate2 Salaries
$47,902/yr
Associate4 Salaries
$49,494/yr
Salaries for similar jobs
Program Analyst2 Salaries
$102,895/yr
Biologist5 Salaries
$83,194/yr
SCEP2 Salaries
$17/hr

What Employees Say

Pros
Pros
"Conservation"(in 6 reviews)
"Dedicated staff"(in 5 reviews)
Pros
"Great people"(in 10 reviews)
Cons
Cons
"Conservation"(in 5 reviews)
"Upper management"(in 5 reviews)
Cons
"Red tape"(in 6 reviews)
"Biologists"(in 4 reviews)
Featured Review

Former Employee - IT Director

I worked at Defenders of Wildlife full-time for more than 5 years

Pros

I recently retired from Defenders after nearly five years in a mid-level support position. I believe that several recent and highly negative Glassdoor reviews paint an unfair picture of the... organization. The 49 years I’ve spent in the workforce – including more than 30 years with trade and non-profit organizations – prompts me to offer my own observations about the organization and what it is like to work there. People who work for cause-oriented non-profits are motivated at least in part by a desire to do good, rather than do well. I concede that I wasn’t juggling massive student debt when I went to work at Defenders, as did so many of my younger former colleagues, but I always though the “doing good” salary scale – along with the knowledge that my work served a higher purpose (and a quite impressive employee benefits package) -- was good enough. As best I can determine, salary levels at Defenders are competitive with those in other non-profit organizations, but not (alas) with those in trade associations and for-profit employers. I can’t think of a single Defenders employee at any level in the organization (including much-maligned executives) who wouldn’t make a lot more working for ExxonMobil, Boeing or one DC’s many lobbying firms. I was frankly floored to read several highly negative reviews of Defenders posted on Glassdoor hinting at a hostile work environment and callous, uncaring managers. Plenty of the workplaces I’ve endured over the years would fit that description, but Defenders of Wildlife is not one of them. I can state with absolute conviction that the abusive, dismissive, or discriminatory behavior hinted at in a number of Glassdoor postings was simply not tolerated at any level within the organization. In fact, Defenders workplace culture compares favorably with the very best workplaces I have seen in my 49-year work career. Perfect? No, but way above average and making genuine efforts to improve. My own experience was that senior management was open to new approaches and solutions, values and rewarded personal initiative, and encouraged peer-to-peer and inter-disciplinary teamwork. Efforts to improve diversity, equity and inclusion in the workforce were ongoing. Work at Defenders is not without drama, something to be expected when bright, articulate, passionate people struggle daily with limited resources on a mission acknowledged to be critical for the planet. The high drama -- like winning an important legislative battle, saving an at-risk habitat from commercial exploitation, developing new technology to advance wildlife science, or matching new donors for important projects – uplifted us all. The low drama -- like grousing about salaries, gossiping about the CEO, and anonymously posting “this place sucks” posts on Glassdoor – saddens me and leaves prospective employees with a misleading picture of what it’s like to work at Defenders.

Cons

Please see "Pros" narrative, above.

Former Employee - Biologist

I worked at US Fish and Wildlife Service full-time

Pros

Research and praxis with a mission

Cons

Government can be slow at times

Job Postings