Compare Keurig Green Mountain vs Hypertherm BETA

See how Hypertherm vs. Keurig Green Mountain compare on employee ratings, job openings, CEO approval, business outlook and more.

Employee Ratings

Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
3.1
(based on 396 reviews)
3.8
(based on 66 reviews)
Career Opportunities
2.9
3.2
Compensation & Benefits
3.6
3.5
Work-life balance
3.0
4.0
Senior Management
2.6
3.6
Culture & Values
3.1
4.2
CEO Approval
Keurig Green Mountain Ceo Bob Gamgort
78%Bob Gamgort
Hypertherm Ceo Evan Smith
97%Evan Smith
% Recommend to a friend
51%
68%
Positive Business Outlook
41%
60%

Salaries

Salaries for similar jobs
Machine Operator20 Salaries
$16/hr
Product Developer II7 Salaries
$64,980/yr
Business Analyst7 Salaries
$85,918/yr
Machine Operator3 Salaries
$20/hr
Plasma Process Engineer11 Salaries
$77,730/yr
Business Analyst2 Salaries
$70,802/yr

What Employees Say

Pros
"Great benefits"(in 47 reviews)
"Good benefits"(in 31 reviews)
"Profit sharing"(in 21 reviews)
"Great place"(in 6 reviews)
Cons
"Work life balance"(in 21 reviews)
"Keurig"(in 21 reviews)
"Decision making"(in 5 reviews)
"Profit sharing"(in 4 reviews)
Featured Review

Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

I worked at Keurig Green Mountain full-time

Pros

Lots of growth and opportunities.

Cons

Siloed business units and decreasing transparency

Former Employee - Test Technician

I worked at Hypertherm full-time for more than 5 years

Pros

Hypertherm is the leader in it’s industry, and seeing how a company of this magnitude and quality operates is an experience in and of itself. I particularly enjoyed working with fellow associates... who share the same ambition, drive, and enthusiasm to succeed as I do.

Cons

Wide variances in priorities that leaders on different teams place on associate development. This can result in decreased engagement, loss of morale, and increased turnover of highly talented... individuals.

Advice to Management

Ensure everyone has a fair shot when applying to internal positions. There were numerous times where a position would open up for internal associates only, and interviews would start. Everything... seems normal in that most who apply get an interview, but at the same time it seems that most of the internal positions that open up are already spoken for but the company has to give off the appearance of conducting a fair and equal opportunity selection process when in fact a favorite or ideal candidate might be identified by those with the power to approve hiring decisions before the internal position even opens up. It is almost as if this is just an extension of another associate’s Career Development Plan, and only one specific person ever had a chance at getting the position.

Job Postings