Compare US Army ROTC vs U.S. Army Reserve BETA

See how U.S. Army Reserve vs. US Army ROTC compare on employee ratings, job openings, CEO approval, business outlook and more.

Employee Ratings

Overall Rating
(full-time and part-time employees only)
4.0
(based on 29 reviews)
4.1
(based on 651 reviews)
Career Opportunities
4.3
4.4
Compensation & Benefits
4.0
4.2
Work-life balance
3.4
3.6
Senior Management
3.5
3.5
Culture & Values
4.2
4.2
CEO Approval
US Army ROTC Ceo Christopher P Hughes
100%Christopher P Hughes
U.S. Army Reserve Ceo Jeffrey W. Talley
82%Jeffrey W. Talley
% Recommend to a friend
85%
78%
Positive Business Outlook
59%
51%

Salaries

Salaries for similar jobs
U S Army Sergeant First Class E71 Salaries
$4,325/mo
Recruiting Center Commander1 Salaries
$91,055/yr
Visual Information Specialist1 Salaries
$64,840/yr
Unit Administrator6 Salaries
$45,688/yr
Senior Human Resources Manager3 Salaries
$80,091/yr
Information Technology Specialist2 Salaries
$65,399/yr

What Employees Say

Pros
There are no reviews matching this company.
"Soldiers"(in 40 reviews)
"Great benefits"(in 38 reviews)
Cons
"Deployments"(in 44 reviews)
"Military"(in 36 reviews)
Featured Review

Former Contractor - Cadet

I worked at US Army ROTC for less than a year

Pros

-Leadership skills that cannot be gained anywhere -Accountability -Great Benefits -Adversity -Builds Character

Cons

-Odd times -Low pay for amount expected

Current Employee - Prior Enlisted Captain

I have been working at U.S. Army Reserve part-time for more than 10 years

Pros

Teamwork focused Professional work environment My personal and favorite element of military service is putting our Nation before petty politics. If you want to work for an organization that is... results-oriented, the Army is the place for you. You can see the effects your hard work has in real-time and you get to learn from the most experienced leaders in the military.

Cons

A lot is expected from TPU soldiers, and, without more time than a single weekend, duty becomes sometimes PowerPoint fluffing.

Advice to Management

Less PowerPoint, more field training.

Job Postings