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Animalz

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Animalz

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Animalz Benefits FAQ

Read what Animalz employees think about benefits at the company.

If you want to see a full list of benefits and perks at Animalz listed by categories, head to their Benefits page. From insurance, health and wellness to vacation and more, find out what you could benefit from when working at Animalz.

All answers shown come directly from Animalz Reviews and are not edited or altered.

What is paid time off like at Animalz?

11 English reviews out of 11

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August 9, 2021

Pros

- If you like writing and editing, you will write and edit a lot. - BIG name clients. - Some (if they’re still around) of the best people you’ll ever work with.

Cons

- A relentless pursuit of growth means Animalz takes on clients it can’t handle and gives them to already overworked content managers (we’re talking 50+ hours many weeks). Clients churn and employees burn out (and eventually leave). - Animalz will sacrifice you for the client. Content managers have been verbally abused but client contracts are sacrosanct. - As of this writing, employee turnover has skyrocketed and leadership has said little more than “this is what you expect from an agency.” - Vacation is hard to take. You have to communicate far in advance and find your own coverage (typically a freelancer). More often than not, you’re working extra hard before your time off and extra hard after. - Internal tools are held together by duct tape and a prayer. Not a week goes by without something going down. - Toxic positivity has infected the company. Venting and other forms of negative talk have been strongly discouraged. - Animalz claims to be women-led but a man is at the helm (the chairman). - Animalz made a big deal about its DEI efforts but followed up months later with… a meeting. And so far, nothing else. - The company is rife with favoritism and that comes with bonuses, reduced work, and praise; it also comes with prejudice and that comes with insults, extra work, and distrust. I’ll let you guess how favoritism and prejudice break down along gender, race, nationality, and sexuality lines. - Animalz pays poorly. If you really want to work here, work here for a year, and then leverage the experience and brand to earn 30K more elsewhere while working less. - Benefits are awful. There are no paid holidays (aside from a couple of “floating holidays”), no dependent coverage, and leadership has laughed off the idea of a 401K match. End-of-year bonuses take the form of Amazon gift cards. No home office stipend. - Leadership has been “taking steps to improve things” for my entire tenure and no progress has been made. If anything, it’s gotten worse. Don’t trust them.

Advice to Management

Please stop talking about your feelings and consider, really consider, the feelings of your current (and departed) employees. The company is hanging by a thread and I don’t know if you realize that. The content managers ARE Animalz and they aren’t happy. We’re a few key employees, a few key clients, away from forever losing our (so far, great) employer brand. Once that goes, I don’t know how we’ll recover.

There are no paid holidays (aside from a couple of “floating holidays”), no dependent coverage, and leadership has laughed off the idea of a 401K match.

August 9, 2021

Reviewed by: Content Manager (Former Employee)

June 17, 2021

Pros

20-some days of paid vacation, Unlimited paid sick and mental health days, great management, great opportunities for promotion, and all of the work is remote.

Cons

From what I understand the interviewing process keeps changing, but when I did it about 4 months back, the article prep information was a bit confusing. It may have gotten better since I did the interview.

some days of paid vacation, Unlimited paid sick and mental health days, great management, great opportunities for promotion, and all of the work is remote.

June 17, 2021

Reviewed by: Technical Writer in Gulfport, MS (Current Employee)

August 9, 2021

Pros

- If you like writing and editing, you will write and edit a lot. - BIG name clients. - Some (if they’re still around) of the best people you’ll ever work with.

Cons

- A relentless pursuit of growth means Animalz takes on clients it can’t handle and gives them to already overworked content managers (we’re talking 50+ hours many weeks). Clients churn and employees burn out (and eventually leave). - Animalz will sacrifice you for the client. Content managers have been verbally abused but client contracts are sacrosanct. - As of this writing, employee turnover has skyrocketed and leadership has said little more than “this is what you expect from an agency.” - Vacation is hard to take. You have to communicate far in advance and find your own coverage (typically a freelancer). More often than not, you’re working extra hard before your time off and extra hard after. - Internal tools are held together by duct tape and a prayer. Not a week goes by without something going down. - Toxic positivity has infected the company. Venting and other forms of negative talk have been strongly discouraged. - Animalz claims to be women-led but a man is at the helm (the chairman). - Animalz made a big deal about its DEI efforts but followed up months later with… a meeting. And so far, nothing else. - The company is rife with favoritism and that comes with bonuses, reduced work, and praise; it also comes with prejudice and that comes with insults, extra work, and distrust. I’ll let you guess how favoritism and prejudice break down along gender, race, nationality, and sexuality lines. - Animalz pays poorly. If you really want to work here, work here for a year, and then leverage the experience and brand to earn 30K more elsewhere while working less. - Benefits are awful. There are no paid holidays (aside from a couple of “floating holidays”), no dependent coverage, and leadership has laughed off the idea of a 401K match. End-of-year bonuses take the form of Amazon gift cards. No home office stipend. - Leadership has been “taking steps to improve things” for my entire tenure and no progress has been made. If anything, it’s gotten worse. Don’t trust them.

Advice to Management

Please stop talking about your feelings and consider, really consider, the feelings of your current (and departed) employees. The company is hanging by a thread and I don’t know if you realize that. The content managers ARE Animalz and they aren’t happy. We’re a few key employees, a few key clients, away from forever losing our (so far, great) employer brand. Once that goes, I don’t know how we’ll recover.

More often than not, you’re working extra hard before your time off and extra hard after.

August 9, 2021

Reviewed by: Content Manager (Former Employee)

January 14, 2022

Pros

Maybe I missed the growing pains, but I'm not sure where the negative reviews come from. I joined the team in 2021 and I can honestly say that this is the first job I've taken in a LONG time where I haven't been looking on Indeed/LinkedIn a few months in to see what else is out there due to issues in the company. I plan on being here as long as they'll have me! Everyone I've met has been supportive and as helpful as they can be. I have not experienced any sort of "toxic" and believe me, I have worked in some incredibly toxic companies before so I'd point it out if it existed. The negative reviews on here claim that the CMs are overworked, but I haven't felt that way at all. This is the first content marketing job I've had where they place an emphasis on your writing quality instead of quantity, and it's incredibly refreshing. As a CM, you'll work with an editor who challenges you and helps you spot your weaknesses so that you can grow as a writer. You'll also have a team lead to help you with any impediments and help you reach the OKRs you set for yourself. Yes, you do work directly with customers, and yes, you are responsible for the relationship, but they're working to bring in customer success managers to help take some of that off the CM's plate. I personally think it's good to work directly with the customers so that as the writer, you can establish that relationship with them and ultimately create better content. Management is also very accessible. I saw a review on here that said the CEO doesn't answer questions during office hours meetings, and that hasn't been my experience at all. Any time I've attended an office hours meeting, she's read each question and answered it as thoroughly as possible or handed it over to someone who could answer better than she could. They also encourage us to reach out via Slack or even set up a meeting with them if we need anything. If you're wanting a job where you have the ability to grow and focus on your writing, then I think you'd love it here. Other pros include: - flex schedule (great for parents especially) - 4 weeks of PTO + 5 floating holidays (first place I've worked that gives this much PTO!) - unlimited sick time/personal days (like, you can actually be sick and not have to use your PTO. amazing.) - decent benefits - 401K - detailed onboarding training

Cons

Just to keep it real, these would be the cons I've experienced: - dependent coverage is expensive - it can be overwhelming at first to learn all the processes (but that's true of any job) - you don't have any input on the clients you're assigned, which can be frustrating at times especially if you don't have existing knowledge of their field/they're more technical than what you're used to - when you work at a place with employees across the globe, it can take longer than what you're used to in a typical company to get answers to a question

unlimited sick time/personal days (like, you can actually be sick and not have to use your PTO.

January 14, 2022

Reviewed by: Content Marketing Manager (Current Employee)

February 24, 2022

Pros

- Remote work with little supervision, allowing for flexibility to work basically whenever I want to. - Onboarding is thorough and ramps up to full production slowly - Working with some of the smartest, brightest minds in content marketing, especially the Quality Team (editors) and Team Leads - If you're lucky, being assigned to write for some big-name clients and getting to exercise writing for others to gain additional practice and experience in other verticals - Working with a time-zone diverse team across the world. - Decent salary with healthcare coverage for U.S., but nothing to write home about. Management says their goal is to be above 50% of the U.S. which means pay is just slightly above average, but you'll make way more working in-house at a tech company similar to one of our clients. - Three main tracks for career development: writing, leadership (strategy), editor. You can pursue whichever one speaks to you and your career goals. - Other CMs, your Team Lead and CSM are really supportive and uplifting of each other. No work drama/favorites, and opportunities to earn public recognition for doing a great job

Cons

- Hardcore burnout. Been here for about 6 months and I've reached full production (8 article-credits) ONCE. It's a constant stressor that I'm below expectations and even though mid-management (my Team Lead) is chill about it, the company being below production goals as a whole is something that's brought up often by upper management. - Under staffed. We don't have enough CMs to manage the workload we take on, which makes it difficult to deliver on our promises to clients. We don't utilize freelancers as much as we should, which means CMs work double to make sure pieces are delivered before they go on breaks. Also understaffed on editors and copyeditors, which means when they take breaks, the rest are overworked and everyone feels bad about it. - To go with point 2, there's a hiring freeze for CMs right now, while we still see 3-6 CMs quit/fired a month. The workload is unsustainable and leading to CMs burning out to over deliver and customers churning over not meeting expectations -- or multiple CMs working hard to deliver on backlogs, which there are MORE of than not. Meanwhile, we've had so many upper management hires in the last few months - I'm not entirely sure why. The CEO talks about the org restructure, the org restructure -- but none of that is benefiting the CMs, who do the bread and butter work of Animalz: creating good content. - Comp is just okay. It's above average for entry-level/early career CMs but plateaus. No 401k match, no employer contributions for dependent coverage. PTO (20 vacation days, 5 floating holidays) is prorated based on start date, so I only had 2-3 holidays when I started in Q3 2021 - one for Thanksgiving and 1.75 for Xmas. Unlimited sick days + personal days are hard to use/justify because you have to play massive catch up when you do take them. - Learning curve is steep. Our L&D dept of one tries her best to create new resources and update old ones for us, but the processes and tools are too many and too hard to keep track of. We need a simpler content pipeline, and less shared tools. We're also expected to do things that we haven't been trained on - like ideation and content strategy, which is very, very time-consuming and difficult - You don't get to pick your clients. I was placed on a highly technical customer whose content was extremely difficult to write. Sometimes clients can be a nightmare to work with - unresponsive, demanding, nitpicky. Part of being an agency is that we're always at the beck and call of the clients. Adding CSMs to the team has mitigated the amount of context switching CMs have to do to manage clients - It's draining and time consuming to context switch. We run meetings with clients, ideate and create new content strategy AND write two articles per week. It's a lot of work and I've pulled long nights and shifts to get work done. - It's difficult to level up and promote to get salary raises. While there are paths to career development, there's really no time to work on it. Where do I find the time to work on personal development and learning the skills necessary to level up (i.e. content strategy)? - leadership says DE&I is really important but I have yet to see that really exemplified. For example, auditing our documentation for inclusive language was done on a volunteer basis - but CMs are BUSY as mentioned before. - If you want to use your experience to apply for a job elsewhere, you'll have to be creative about your portfolio because we're legally not allowed to share who our clients are, and our writing becomes the IP of Animalz/Clients. Even if you get lucky and score the big accounts, you can't mention them. Can turn your job interviews into "Source: Trust me, bro." Hopefully, the skills you hone at Animalz speak for themselves though.

Advice to Management

- Increase compensation for CMS and hire more CMs instead of allocating budget to adding new leadership roles. CMs are leaving because they can get paid way more going in-house than trying to promote to the next level in vain while hustling to deliver for our clients. - Lower workload expectations, especially for CMs with highly technical customers - Make it easier for CMs to take time off without playing massive catchup or working to find their own coverage - Do SOMETHING about burnout. It should be apparent when long-time employees mention it and change roles to try and fight the burnout. Try a 4-day workweek or taking company weeks off 2x a year? CEO has talked about the 4day workweek not being feasible for us, but one of our competitors does it. Long term, hire more CMs or make good use of our freelancer pool so the company workload is less stressful for everyone to manage. - Simplify training resources so there's not as much to sift through (especially outdated pages) - Announce employee departures sooner than the same week so we actually have a chance to say goodbye before they bounce. It comes as a big shock and seems like HR wants to sweep terminations/employee churn under the rug and move on. - Add learning opportunities + room for CMs to take those learning opps with a decrease in custom workload expectations so they're not penalized for trying to level up - If there's one leadership role to add, consider a DE&I hire. Or, hire and promote more diversely. - Clients are churning because we can't deliver on our contracts. We need more CMs and support to meet expectations. Also, our prices are too high for what our clients can get cheaper by hiring in-house; and those positions are paid better than we are, so CMs are churning too. Looking for the rest of this year, I feel like some of your best CMs will be looking to transfer to an in-house company where they can get better total comp (salary, equity, more PTO that isn't prorated by start date, more stipends). We've seen massive growth as a company, but the CMs don't see any of that. The company all-hands meetings aren't useful and packed full of unintelligible corporate jargon. I love the people who work at Animalz, and the culture, but the comp doesn't align with how burnt out I am after just 6 months here. I really want to stay and I'm sure some of the CMs who've left do too, but the burnout is a lot

PTO (20 vacation days, 5 floating holidays) is prorated based on start date, so I only had 2

February 24, 2022

Reviewed by: Content Marketing Manager (Current Employee)

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11 English reviews out of 11