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Animalz

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Animalz

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November 18, 2020

Pros

Animalz is the first place I've worked where I really feel confident in the leadership team. They're still learning, but they have a clear, competent vision for the company, and they lead with empathy. Everyone who works here is kind. I could chat with people all day in Slack. Work is intellectually challenging, and there are tons of learning opportunities. Promotions are frequent, and professional development is a priority.

Cons

It's hard to strike a work life balance when you're full-time remote. It can also be isolating. But, there is enough external pressure to keep you motivated, and employees are active on Slack and receptive if you want to schedule some 1:1 zoom time. Ramp up when you first join is also overwhelming. There's a lot of processes to learn, and a very specific way the editing team expects you to write. I'd also read some negative reviews on here that made me afraid to ask questions and really be myself. But those reviews were wrong, everyone is very kind and helpful, and the job - and Animalz way of writing - get easier. Pay can be a con, depending on where you live. If you're in NYC, for example, it's not great. If you're in Europe or middle America, it's excellent.

Advice to Management

Your goals and vision for the company are inspiring. If you stay true to what you showed us in the last All Hands, we're on a path for healthy, happy growth. Keep increasing pricing, and stick to those price points. We don't need to compromise. The demand is there because we're the best in the business.

It's hard to strike a work life balance when you're full Read More

November 18, 2020

Reviewed by: Content Marketing Manager in Paris (Current Employee)

January 11, 2022

Pros

Very supportive team environment; amazing coworkers! If you have questions several people will offer solutions or direct you to the right resource. Leadership values intelligence and encourages career growth. You are empowered to work independently and take ownership of your role. Transparent, clear communication. Amazing benefits package. Work-life balance is good if you're efficient at what you do. I've noted the high turnover below, but it's usually because people have learned a lot and are moving on. And the company celebrates that! This is a great place to grow your career!

Cons

Work load can be intense; leads to lots of employee turnover. Processes are great when they exist. But when a process is lacking or nonexistent, it's tough to get answers about something. (That said, process improvement is encouraged. No "we've always done it this way" mentality). No 401k match. Insurance for family members is really expensive.

life balance is good if you're efficient at what you do. Read More

January 11, 2022

Reviewed by: Anonymous (Current Employee)

August 31, 2021

Pros

Your fellow writers and editors are amazing people. They are talented people. Your direct manager really does care about you, your work, your experience. Unfortunately your direct manager is unable to make most necessary changes to the teams and processes that everyone needs to be successful. Exposure to some really cool clients. Truly remote, * kind of sort of * flexible hours (depending on where you live). Your peers live around the globe. I’m pretty sure all six inhabited continents are represented in some way. It should be noted that regardless of where you live, you are expected to work mostly Eastern US hours. I’m going to list benefits as a pro because they are much better than a lot of people have access to, however, I would not consider them “competitive” or “really great.” PTO is 20 days + 5 floating holidays. There are “unlimited” sick and personal days. However, given the nature of the business, it’s hard to really take quality time off because it means more work and stress on the other end for lost time and missed quotas, or asking other team members to take your work while you’re gone, or finding freelancer coverage for yourself while you’re gone. Regardless of where you live, bank holidays/federal holidays are not recognized (there are 11 in the US). This is where you can use your 5 floating holidays. It’s also worth noting if you aren’t US based, you are an independent contractor, and as such, you are not entitled to any benefits. This is despite the fact their website says everyone is hired as a “full time” employee. There is also no dependent coverage. Working here might be a good fit if it’s your first job, or you are brand new to content marketing. The pay is somewhat decent by that standard.

Cons

Both employee churn and customer churn is bad. Employee churn is the worst I’ve ever seen at any company I’ve worked for. At the time of this writing, most people seem to be leaving the company after having worked only six to nine months. Though leadership will tell you at a 100 person company, losing an average of four employees a month is * totally normal. * There’s non-solicitation clauses added to client contracts, saying that no Animalz employee can work for them for two years. Usually non-solicitation clauses are added to a * worker’s * contract to stop them from going to work for the competition in fear of sharing secrets and processes. This can’t be said for Animalz. There is no secret sauce strategy or process at Animalz (though their PR stunts would suggest otherwise) — the entire company is successful because the people who work(ed) there are smart. If you ever want another job (and you will) this is not the place for you as you will not be able to work at any company that has used Animalz. If you have any experience, or a particular niche skillset or knowledge, the pay is not even a little bit competitive. Animalz is likely not going to do much to further your career if you already have experience. You’ll recognize pretty quickly your skillsets are being taken advantage of and unfairly compensated for. They purposefully hire way below what they know you’re worth and promise to “promote you quickly.” Some people get promoted, others do not. Their transparent salary system was a sham and they’ve since replaced it with salary bands that have nonsensical requirements and actually caps out individual contributors at a lower salary than the older leveling system. It’s very clear their new plan is to keep people at low salaries, burn them out, then replace them. There is no structure to grow people. Leadership is really good at making sure new employees don’t see how problematic things are until a few months in. In your first few months you’ll likely be asked to write a Glassdoor review by more than one management team member, because in your first few months you’ll likely have a positive view of the company (hint). You know it’s a bad sign when the only active, positive people in meetings, video chats, and on Slack are those who have all been there less than 3 months. I re-read the review someone wrote in 2019 about what life is really like at Animalz, and unfortunately it seems not a lot has changed since then. People have been complaining about the tools and processes for a very long time. They are not scaling with company growth. At all. Dealing with these unworkable tools and process takes up so much of your time it’s astounding. You won’t have direct access to the tools you need. Accounts are either a giant shared email (which comes with problems), or it’s potentially under someone else’s work email (that may not even work there anymore)! People have to bug other people in Slack for passwords or to get 2-factor codes for a tool they’re using someone else’s email for. The whole workflow is chaos. But leadership continues to say everything is fine, because surveys show people are fine with the tools. Yes, when your entire staff is constantly churning and the majority of them are brand new, they will not spot the problems with workflows and tools. Leadership is dismissive of those who have been at the company a while who give negative feedback because it is undoubtably a smaller percentage, and therefore in the minority. This is no-doubt used as an excuse to not invest money into working processes. There’s been a huge breakdown between two tools that are integral to the company and instead of fixing them, leadership’s response was to tell everyone that they need to practice the value of “ownership” and deal with it themselves. The way they deal with internal tools is actually frightening, both from an employee perspective as well as a security perspective. The work-life balance is an interesting one. Some people seem to do okay and some people are continuously working 60+ hours a week to get things done. Yet, this has nothing to do with how talented someone is or how time-oriented they are. This is pretty much up to luck on who your clients are. Some clients are easy. Some clients are toxic. The current growth-over-everything mindset means the company is taking on clients regardless of if there’s bandwidth to work with them, regardless of how niche or technical they want their content, regardless of if they have buy-in to be a part of the feedback loop and have time to work with a CM. There is no matching process for clients and CMs. It very quickly starts to feel like a content farm. They have implemented “custom workloads” to adjust for burnout, however, “custom workloads” seem to be a thing that is dangled in front of everyone, but no one really knows how it’s supposed to work — most people haven’t seen any reasonable change. In fact, in a recent company update, leadership was bragging about how they were able to get new hires to be putting out content at the highest level of the old quota system in their third month. So which is it? Do people get custom workloads, or do they need to quickly learn to churn out content based on the old quota system? No one knows. I would suggest you seek out a CM on LinkedIn who has been at Animalz at least 6 months and ask what the current workload situation is like. If your job is a CM, be prepared to be a CM, strategist, project manager, and account manager. You have to manage and keep track of the entire client relationship, as well as strategize, write, perform administrative duties, and provide reporting (reporting is a nightmare and mostly always broken). If you happen to be a freelancer who is thinking about working here, this job is basically still freelancing, except you don’t have any control over which clients you work with. Your direct manager is theoretically supposed to be a strategist, and they are talented strategists, but they have no time to actually help with strategy — they are constantly people managing as well as onboarding both new clients and employees. And they are usually also managing freelancers, as the business does rely heavily on freelancers to keep up to pace with clients. They have plans to introduce a new team structure, however that plan is little more than a few bullet points on a slide. There’s no details, no job descriptions, no actual answers on how any of it will work. CMs, regardless of their level will still have to carry the brunt of all the work until it's figured out and then won’t be promoted even though they’ve been doing all the work. If you are brand new to content marketing, don’t expect much of a supportive education here. You need to do it on your own time and likely find your own resources. They claim you can get a solid education on strategy, SEO, and writing, however no one has time to teach you anything. People will try to be helpful and share knowledge, but you can also see that most people around you are overworked and burnt out. It’s simply not a good learning environment. Beyond that, tenured and experienced employees are leaving at a rapid rate, leaving few employees left who know the business to learn from anyway. There has been so much lip service about making “ideal customer profiles” to match with CMs, about how they want to integrate L&D to invest in people, how they want to create custom workloads rather than a straight quota based system, how they want to be more active with DEI. None of these things seem to be able to move past the planning phase. There is no concrete timeline or real action being taken on any of it. Again, I would suggest seeking out a current CM at the company who has been there more than 6 months to get an accurate view of the current state of these things. And lastly, leadership. Toxic positivity and deflection seems to be at the core of leadership. Leadership will talk your ear off about transparency, but refuses to answer hard questions or address anything negative. Every single problem the company has is ignored (or blamed on the pandemic) until the issue feels like it’s going to cause an implosion. I think the delusion they have is that if they don’t talk about it, employees will forget the issues exist. Churn rates say otherwise. They very clearly focus on keeping brand new employees happy and write off existing employees as soon as it’s clear those employees no longer think the company is shiny and perfect, or have the audacity to ask a tough question and expect a real answer. Leadership consistently makes public posts or gives interviews about how great the Animalz process is and how Animalz is different. These posts kill employee morale because the posts are so hypocritical and not realistic to the experience and process at all. How Animalz says it operates and how it actually operates is a difference of day and night. If in the end you decide to work for Animalz, I highly suggest you watch any video that is available of company all-hands meetings and the CEO’s office hours (from the past four/five months of this posting at least). They are all recorded and made available to employees who couldn’t attend. These videos will shed some light on the deflection and failure to address the reality of the issues.

Advice to Management

Stop deflecting and take responsibility for what’s happening. The issues at Animalz have nothing to do with the pandemic (other than people have decided that with more remote opportunities they don’t need to put up with toxic environments that take advantage of them). Don’t announce initiatives or plans until you actually have something more than a few sentences on a slide deck — have a real plan. Turn your lip service into action in reasonable, concrete timelines. What I can’t really fathom is how you expect to maintain any sort of reputation as your cohort of ex-employees grows extensively, and quickly. Also, when three positive reviews go up in one day it looks desperate. People on this site aren’t that stupid.

life balance is an interesting one. Read More

August 31, 2021

Reviewed by: Content Manager (Former Employee)

November 2, 2022

Pros

Tara the CEO is exceptional Good work/life balance Great people Good opportunities to work with really impressive clients

Cons

Very high stress CMs burn out & not enough is being done to fix it

Tara the CEO is exceptional Good work/life balance Great people Good opportunities to work with really impressive clients Read More

November 2, 2022

Reviewed by: Content Manager (Former Employee)

December 15, 2022

Pros

Animalz has a knack for hiring amazing people. The editors, writers, and most of the team leads are talented and empathetic, really focusing on teamwork. The editors especially will force you to improve your writing through their high standards, discerning eyes, and constructive feedback. I became a much better content marketer under my team lead's direction and my editor's guidance. Truly flexible hours because the workforce is globally distributed. Outside of meetings with your team and your clients, you can do your work whenever you want. If you're lucky, you get to write for big-name clients in tech, and usually will be able to gain additional experience writing across verticals. While most clients sign on for blog posts or articles, some clients request different kinds of content that you can use to fill your portfolio, like social media copy for Twitter or LinkedIn, copywriting for landing pages, whitepapers, and eBooks. The Animalz brand is relatively well-known in the content marketing world, built mostly on its past reputation more than its current state. Having Animalz on your resume alone can open a lot of doors for freelancing and job hunting.

Cons

Animalz has been rapidly spiraling toward its doom for a while now. Customer churn due to both the state of the tech industry and Animalz's high price point is ridiculously high. And employee attrition is right there too. Morale sank to rock bottom after three highly-respected editors were unceremoniously and suddenly laid off in November. Scheduled cost of living adjustments and promotion cycles were put on indefinite freeze until leadership could bring Animalz out of its financial nose dive. There are no professional development or growth opportunities like an upskill fund, structured content marketing courses (which you'd think Animalz could develop with the combined talent that lives there) -- or even time for CMs to upskill with their rigorous workloads. Given all these factors, why would anyone choose to stick with the company when the company hasn't shown any commitment to us, the employees? Leadership states that they've been focused on bettering the financials of the company first by focusing on production and developing its new AI content service, and employee retention and development have had to sit on the back burner in the meantime. In fact, the attrition has been called out as a positive because leadership didn't have to lay off any CMs to match our decreasing customer base. While I acknowledge that some of my coworkers have had nothing but positive experiences working at Animalz, that hasn't been true for myself and many current and ex-colleagues. There's a reason why the average tenure of an Animalz employee is just over a year, according to LinkedIn. It's because most sane content marketers that focus on quality of work over quantity work aren't set up to succeed at Animalz. There are so many systemic issues at Animalz, but the main problem that bleeds into all the others: The leaders at the helm of the company making the big business decisions have no idea what they're doing, and don't lead with empathy for the people actually doing the work that Animalz sells - CMs, editors, TLs and CSMs. When I started at Animalz, the agency was in the midst of a furious hiring spree to catch up with the unsustainable workloads they had signed due to onboarding new clients. My client already had a backlog before my first day because they had been waiting for me to start. Backlogs and being behind on client work is a common theme at Animalz and leadership treats it like a failure on the part of CMs, TLs and CSMs when it's a process issue. Production goals are extremely difficult for most CMs to meet. You're expected to write 8 high-quality articles or an equivalent length per month (~2 per week). This doesn't sound like much at first, but the work pace is grueling, especially with the number of times your drafts need to be reviewed if you're under L4. This makes it extremely easy to fall behind on delivery dates and your KPIs -- and then stay behind forever. And that's exactly what happened to me. I started trying to work overtime to catch up but I could never reach that unattainable 8-article goal due to my clients not giving approvals in time and the extra responsibilities we're expected to do -- client revisions for each piece, monthly reporting and client meetings, doing ideation and creating content briefs. Not to mention my own personal issues outside of work, outside of my control. Inevitably, I started burning out just 6 months into my Animalz experience. If I had to point to a single defining moment as the point of no return for Animalz, it would be when a specific person was hired to whip CMs and TLs into shape so that the company would increase production. The processes she's put in place penalize CMs for not delivering a full 8 credits every month, but doesn't allow room or understanding for the delays and issues that cause us to not be able to do so. Under her watchful eye, anyone with low monthly production averages gets flagged as underperformers. They get put on performance improvement plans, regardless of whether or not their Team Lead agrees with the decision, to try to manage them out or squeeze every last ounce of productivity out of them forcefully. Some of our international employees with lower KPIs have been placed without notice on a pay-per-credit model -- or even let go with no notice. Most importantly, we were told if you can't maintain a 3-month rolling monthly average of 6.5 articles, you can't take time off. When you put an already-worn axe to the grinder, something's got to give. For me, that was my mental and physical health. I wanted so badly to take some PTO time off to recover, but the company moved from 20 days PTO to "unlimited" PTO - with the caveat that you had to be meeting your 3-month production average of 6.5 credits. In a perfect world, where everything goes right -- yes, 6.5 credits wouldn't be unreasonable to expect. But for those of us working on the ground level, we know it's not possible for many of us - especially those with any form of neurodivergence. I was unable to take time off... and so I continued to burn out until there was nothing left of me to give until finally, I flunked out of Animalz. Despite the quality of my work constantly being praised by editors, clients, my TL and CSM, I was an underperformer based solely on quantity - which is the main metric by which leadership evaluates your work. There is no empathy for the hard, meaningful work that we do. We're treated like robots, supposed to churn out content day after day. Leadership lacks the fundamental understanding of what goes into creating content for our clients; they really believe that you should be spending two days per article, even accounting for editorial review cycles and queues, and use one day for the other work tasks heaped on us. Despite the flexible schedules, there is no work-life balance. The delivery date is supreme; I know several other CMs and I have pulled allnighters and worked weekends to get articles submitted to the editing queues on time... and pray that the editors, who are now very overworked doing 1.5x their previous workloads, can get feedback to you in time to deliver. It's common nowadays for me to see my editor log in early and work late to make sure we all get our pieces back by end of day, which is really disheartening. As a former colleague noted in their review, Animalz causes many of us to develop or worsen problems with substances, sleep, and anxiety due to the stress of the job. Because of the editorial team layoffs, there's now a huge problem with quality. Our clients pay to get really good content that's been reviewed up to three times -- usually by an editor twice and a copyeditor once. For L4+ CMs, that was one editor review and one copyeditor review. Now, the copyediting stage has been replaced for L4+ CMs... with Grammarly. A poor substitute for the careful review of our gifted copyeditor team. When concerns have been raised about this, leadership said the quality you get from Grammarly is about on par with a copyeditor's review and that if you're really that concerned, you can raise the issue with our Lead Editor and fight to get approved to put your pieces in the copyediting queue. Perhaps I wasn't the right fit for Animalz. I'm sure that this review will be ignored or publicly refuted, as was once done by our CEO in an email to all employees, as the remarks of a disgruntled ex-employee. But after talking to many current and ex-Animalz, I've come to think that most people aren't right for Animalz. Or rather, Animalz isn't the right company for most people, because the people in charge don't know how to manage it.

Advice to Management

Listen to what employees are saying and have been saying for ages instead of gaslighting them. Burnout is a serious issue. Production KPIs and minimum averages are an issue. Internal messaging is an issue. The inability to take time off either because of production KPIs or because of the massive workload awaiting you upon your return is an issue. Overly demanding clients who give mountains of feedback are an issue. Low compensation and lack of 401k matching are issues. Foster psychological safety for employees by eliminating the "no venting" policy and encouraging employees to express frustrations and problems without being put down or gaslit. When we raise issues currently, we're told that we're the only ones experiencing that issue, which makes us feel alone and unheard... until we talk to each other and realize -- no, everyone has this issue. Everyone is burnt out. Everyone is tired of being held to unrealistic production expectations. Everyone is looking for new jobs because Animalz doesn't care to retain us. Lead with empathy for team members over customers. Adjust workload expectations for CMs because not all CMs have the same kind of workload or smooth clients. Even if promotions or bonuses aren't financially possible, give recognition more boldly and loudly about the contributions that hard-working team members do make. Consider slimming down the C-suite or taking exec pay cuts before conducting any more layoffs. Acknowledge the impact that layoffs have on employee morale instead of sweeping everything under the rug as a necessary business decision. Real people and their livelihoods were affected and you have to put in the hard work to earn employee trust back instead of just telling us to deal with the reality of the company's financials. Carve out time for CMs to actually pursue professional development opportunities and upskill. Part of the reason we have such huge backlogs is that we're supposed to do ideation for our customers, but if you don't know how to do it, you have no time to learn how to do so with your ceaseless production expectations. We also have no time (or money) to take courses on skills we don't have resources on, like crafting email marketing campaigns or writing LinkedIn thought leadership. Enable employees to actually take time off instead of micromanaging and examining every PTO request against our KPIs. Institute mandatory minimum PTO. Adjust expectations with clients if there's no coverage available for CMs taking time off. Push back on unreasonable clients instead of letting CSMs get steamrolled and not advocate for CMs. Accept less of those huge one-off projects. They're poorly scoped and always come with unreasonable workloads and deadlines. Stop being hardasses on delivery dates. Most of our clients don't care as long as we communicate. There's no such thing as a content marketing emergency; stop manufacturing them. All it does is put pressure on everyone working on content to work faster and spend less time doing intentional, meaningful work. Create accountability for the C-suite. If we have to prove everything that we've done in a month, and fight to get credit for our work, leadership should prove the results of what they work on too. More than just the $$ numbers and action tours to talk about what you should do. Outline the exact action items you've done every month and plan to do next month. And maybe, consider picking up a credit of work each quarter to see just how much work goes into writing just one Animalz-quality article. I believe that Tara, the new interim CEO, is well-intentioned and trying her best to improve conditions at the company. I hope that she puts her money where her mouth is, and makes Animalz a great place to work again. I hope that she recognizes this review as the voicing of valid concerns from someone who genuinely wants to see the people at Animalz thrive. Otherwise, Animalz will continue to lose their best and brightest to tech companies like our customers -- or even other content marketing agencies.

life balance. Read More

December 15, 2022

Reviewed by: Content Marketing Manager (Former Employee)

July 7, 2021

Pros

It's a very supportive environment. Other team members are always willing to help and onboarding process helps new hires to quickly learn internal processes. Lots of opportunities to learn and grow. There are plenty educational resources that employees can use to upskill and get promoted. Transparency. CEO and the leadership team are regularly informing employees on the latest initiatives and you can always request a 1:1 meeting with anyone to voice your concerns. Great clients. Some of the biggest names in the SaaS and tech world are working with Animalz so it's a unique opportunity to collaborate with these brands and help them with their content needs. Remote work and location-agnostic salary. Everyone gets the same pay (benchmarked against the US standards) so you can live anywhere you want in the world without worrying whether the company will cut your pay because of lower living costs. Work gets done mostly in an asynchronous manner. Also, Animalz won't ask you to work overtime and there's a good work-life balance.

Cons

Not all clients are great. Some clients are demanding and don't really know how SEO and content marketing works, which adds a level of stress. Marketers who don't like or know to write well will find it hard to work at Animalz as the company is HIGHLY demanding when it comes to this. But there are editors who work with marketers on each piece of content so it gets easier over time. Although the company invests a lot of effort in improving internal processes and tools, there is still work left to be done here.

life balance. Read More

July 7, 2021

Reviewed by: Content Marketing Manager (Current Employee)

July 1, 2021

Pros

Animalz hires incredible people. Current and former employees are now great friends and trusted confidantes. If you're looking for a place to start your content marketing career, Animalz could be a great fit. You'll work with knowledgable people and get a lot of experience. I think the salary is fairly competitive for a first job. I believe there are people in leadership who legitimately care about the CMs they manage. They are willing to work with you to find solutions to problems and try to support you, but I think sometimes their hands are tied and they can only do so much.

Cons

Like a lot of companies that quickly expand, Animalz is experiencing growing pains, and unfortunately, it causes stress for overworked and under-compensated CMs. Salaries are transparent, but I do not think that compensation is always competitive for CMs or always logical. New graduates may make more than employees at higher levels. People with technical skills are not compensated for their knowledge. Employees with 10+ years experience or postgraduate degrees make less than those without as much experience or education. Maybe these people are just better negotiators. It is unclear. I accepted a lower salary because Animalz promises lots of opportunities for promotion, but I finally realized that the only way to get a reasonable salary jump was to leave. (After talking to other former employees, compensation was a major motivating factor. Most everyone now makes at least $30K more and has better work-life balance.) As stated above, I had great co-workers, but I rarely felt supported as a team member. CMs have so many customers and so much work that there is no support system in place if you need help or need someone to cover for you. It was hard to take vacation because I was responsible for finding my own coverage. And it is widely accepted that you will be working hard before, during, or after your vacation to make up for it. I think there is simply too much work for each CM. It is a juggling game of keeping customers happy and continually churning out content to meet stress-inducing quotas. My team lead was so busy that they rarely had time to help me with problematic customers. There just is not enough people or time in the day to provide that support and CMs struggle because of it. I liked the culture of positivity that Animalz had when I joined, but I think it has taken a turn. Now that positivity seems somewhat toxic. Employees are even instructed not to complain or vent in Slack. Transparency is talked about a lot but practiced inconsistently. You can ask leadership anonymous questions, but they can also go unanswered. When questions are addressed, sometimes leadership is noticeably unhappy with you for asking tough questions. There is a growing sense of distrust. Why do we need to sign documentation that leadership can read our DMs? Why are employees questioned about their social media posts? Are the employee engagement surveys truly anonymous? These changes in company policy and culture left me feeling unsafe and unable to function to the best of my ability. While I appreciated working for a women-led leadership team, I do not know if they have the necessary power to make the major changes that the organization needs.

Advice to Management

Listen to what employees say in exit interviews. We want Animalz to improve because we value the people who are still there and want work life to get better for them. Act sooner rather than later. Employees are unhappy, discouraged, and burned out, and promising changes or promotions months down the line might be too late. Value employees over customers. Please put their best interests first. The incredible people you consistently hire are what can make Animalz a great place to work again.

life balance.) Read More

July 1, 2021

Reviewed by: Content Marketing Manager (Former Employee)

August 11, 2021

Pros

INCREDIBLE company culture that truly encourages growth by having open conversations about struggles and working together as team to solve them. You never have to be afraid of saying "I don't know" or asking for help. The team motto is "content writing is a team sport" and at Animalz they really live this out. They also really walk the talk when it comes to work-life balance and promoting mental and physical health. People openly message their teams and say "hey I need a mental health day, be back tomorrow" and their manager will be the first to hop in and reply "Great, hope you feel better!" There is so much support here. For being a 100% remote company there is also a robust work culture with a lot of opportunities to connect with people on a personal level (they even have scheduled "watercooler talks" where you just talk with someone you don't know about life and get to know them). Their process is really driven by producing excellent content, but also cultivating excellent writers. They focus a lot on setting personal development goals and truly want to put things in place to help you get there, they actually put clearly outlined expectations and plans in place for you to get promoted and want to see you succeed. One obvious example of this is: when I applied they asked how much I wanted to make, I gave them a number and they said "cool, but we think you're worth more than that, how about $20K more?" Our CEO is also great - super approachable - and the whole leadership team really cultivates a culture of transparecy which is great.

Cons

Because it's 100% remote there are a lot of tools to acclimate to and context switching can be a challenge. I know our leadership is putting several initiatives in place to address this though.

Advice to Management

More proactive and process-driven content ideation/approval/ strategy flow for clients. From where I sit, it feels like we're shooting from the hip sometimes. Also, less tools.

life balance and promoting mental and physical health. Read More

August 11, 2021

Reviewed by: Content Manager (Current Employee)

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